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This one might REALLY sound like a stupid question, but is there a table for tax brackets that's easily accessible? I ask because I'm wondering if my college student daughter has earned enough to have to pay taxes this year. What's the income level at which one does NOT have to pay taxes?

***Depends on whether or not the child has income earned from investments, income earned from employment, income from investments and employment income, and whether or not your daughter claims her own exemption on her tax return.

If she is your dependent,and her income from investments is under $700., she need not file a return. If her only income is from employment (in 1999) she could have made $4300, without having any taxable income. If she has any combination of income, under the $4300 that exceeds $700 + 250 of investment income, each $1 over the $950 is taxable. Trying to explain this, so that others may comprehend, is a great task for me!=(: I can understand it conceptually, and have no problem properly reporting. However, I hate puzzles and am not the world's greatest when it comes to explaining them or solving them. I hope, by the time we finish, you will understand!!=:) You'll find a more comprehensive explanation, worksheets, and examples, at the following URL:

http://www.irs.ustreas.gov/prod/forms_pubs/pubs/p92902.htm

It is unlikely but if your child could claim her own exemption, she would want to file a return only to claim a refund, if her total income was under $7050.

You will likely be claiming the exemption for your daughter. Check out the credits for Hope Scholarship, if your child is in her first two years of college, and the Lifetime Learning Credits for secondary education in later periods.

Happy Holidays!!!=:)

"Jack"

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