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Author: PucksFool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 9935  
Subject: Too true to be funny Date: 10/14/2011 12:46 PM
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http://www.cartoonistgroup.com/store/add.php?iid=39090

PF
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Author: PuddinHead42 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 9430 of 9935
Subject: Re: Too true to be funny Date: 10/16/2011 6:41 PM
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That cartoon reminds me of the Harlem Success Academy, the kids going to that charter school had all the problems listed in the cartoon, at high rates no doubt. They carved out a piece in the Harlem public school and took kids from the public school. So same kids, same facilities. Now those kids CRUSH their former peers. I just don't understand why it is so hard to do this. How can you take the same students in the same building and make them perform so much better for less cost. What could possibly be the difference?


There are a number of links, here is a good starter.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlem_Success_Academy

In a comparison of HSA 1 (serving K–4) and the noncharter P.S. 149 (serving pre-K–8), which share a building, an observer found charter students more attentive, charter teachers required to meet with the principal after hours when that's voluntary on the noncharter side even with extra pay, and charter students outperforming noncharter students. Among third graders, while almost no charter student was below grade level, no noncharter student was above grade level. This is in spite of class size being about one or two more per class in the charter school. HSA 1 spends $18,378 yearly per student, versus an estimated $19,358 for the noncharter side.[12]
The N.Y.C. Department of Education surveys parents and teachers, and, for 6th grade and higher, students, in every school every year about qualities of the school. Comparisons are possible where response rates are reasonably high. NYC School Survey results are published.[30]
One organization gives HSA its highest rating and says a small sample of parents do, too.[31]

http://www.harlemacademy.org/

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Author: ishtarastarte Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 9432 of 9935
Subject: Re: Too true to be funny Date: 10/16/2011 9:07 PM
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From the Wiki link:

The school day and year are longer than in most public noncharter schools, running about 8–9 hours a day and with the school year starting in August.[21] Teachers may help students on Saturdays, if necessary.[24]
Parents and students can call teachers on their cell phones, which the school supplies to teachers. The principal is also available.[12]


That has to be at least part of it.

The parents are required to be involved. The students and parents sign contracts.

Either one doesn't live up to their side? Does the student stay anyway? there's a waiting list to get in, so I'd say probably not.

Also:

Teachers come from a wider variety of higher-quality colleges than do teachers typically hired for low-income-student public schools[11] and lead teachers must be certified.[3]
Teachers who work late into an evening to help students are reimbursed for car service home.[12]


And

Children are encouraged to be curious and to engage in higher-order thinking,[3] with chess,[24][8] art,[8][25] social studies,[8] music,[8][25] and sports,[8] and to think of themselves as future college graduates. Uniforms and a student contract are part of the expectations given the children.

There are expectations on the children AND the parents. Teachers work longer hours than normal.

If the student does not live up to expectations, the PARENTS are held responsible.

That just isn't the case in the majority of schools.

Ishtar

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Author: PuddinHead42 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 9435 of 9935
Subject: Re: Too true to be funny Date: 10/16/2011 10:11 PM
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There are expectations on the children AND the parents. Teachers work longer hours than normal.

If the student does not live up to expectations, the PARENTS are held responsible.

That just isn't the case in the majority of schools



Hmmm, seems simple. I keep hearing how its because our schools are in such bad shape or our teachers don't get paid enough or there are too many kids in a class. If we just spent a little more money. Harlem academy disproves those are the main drivers. I live in the shadows of the DC school system which spends more money per student than just about anywhere, fired a great reformer because she cared more about the kids than the union. Union spent $2 million to make her and the mayor go away. Crying shame. Good thing kids aren't the future.

As Dr. Phil would say "how's that working for you DC?"

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