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Author: spl241 Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Favorite Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 886572  
Subject: Traffic Ticket May Mean No $weat Date: 2/21/2013 4:01 PM
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DW got the only ticket between the two of us in almost 100 years of driving after she was late for an important blood test and was clocked at 63 in a 50 zone. We got ready for a rate increase, but it never came. The linked article gives some possible reasons why, and it may help relieve your own anxiety if John Law pulls you over on a day when he got up on the wrong side of the bed. Apparently, our situation is far from unique:

Only 31% of drivers who have gotten at least one traffic ticket say it resulted in an increase from their insurer, according to a survey by InsuranceQuotesDotcom. The likely reason for this low figure? Your insurance company is even cheaper than you are. When an officer flags you down, the infraction goes on your MVR, the motor vehicle record maintained by your state transportation department, but not to your insurer. The company will only find out about your ticket if it pays to see your MVR, at a cost of up to $27 in some states.

"Pulling these records isn't cheap, so they only pull them when they need to," said Laura Adams, a senior analyst at InsuranceQuotesDotcom. If you're like me, you think that a measly 27 bucks isn't going to stop an insurer from raking through your driving record. But they're selective. For example--as you might suspect--younger drivers' MVR's get pulled frequently as do the MVR's of drivers in high-risk status. In fact, the cost of pulling driving records is frequently built into rates. Got a few gray hairs? Only 15% of ticketed drivers above age 50 had their rates raised, according to InsuranceQuotes. Also, ticketed drivers who have other policies with their insurer such as home, boat, motorcycle, etc. will often enjoy a rate increase-free experience.

If you've gotten a ticket recently, the advice of most professionals is to do nothing—-including changing your policy. Switching companies, adding coverage, even buying a high-performance car may bring your infractions to light.

other related details @ http://www.cnbc.com/id/100476549
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