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Author: MoneyPenny06 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 974  
Subject: Transitions Date: 10/19/2006 9:44 AM
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I am planning to leave my job of 17 years, sometime next spring.

I want to spend more time with our daughter before she graduates high school and frankly, I just flat out need a break.

I've been working steadily since college for 23 years and before that, I always worked one or even two! part time jobs.

We will have a dramatic cut in household income, but having always been frugal, we have a nest egg that should carry us just fine until I figure out what I want to do with the rest of my life.

My husband has a good income, with health insurance.

So, in a nutshell, I am more concerned about the huge psychological shift...I was a type A for many years, advanced degrees, certifications, all that..

I would be interested in hearing the stories or getting advice from others who made a similar transition after years in the workforce.

Thank you, MP
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Author: bookaholic Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 963 of 974
Subject: Re: Transitions Date: 10/19/2006 5:31 PM
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Cool, MP! I did not have years in the workforce, before staying home, but I went through all the motions of preparing for a high-powered career, and I have always worked, ever since I could babysit in middle school. I don't know if I am a type A, but I think I must be close.

Since I have been at home, I have always had at least one project going on. We have transferred a lot for DH's career, so quite often one of those projects was getting the family settled, or learning a new language. But I have also taken a lot of arts and crafts classes, volunteered at schools and elsewhere, renovated our current home, and worked part-time from home ever since my oldest was about three. At times, I was only working a few hours a week, but the money was always helpful, and it was good for me, too.

Nowadays, I work about 10-15 hours per week from home, and starting around the beginning of the next school year, I am planning to drop most of my clients and look for employment outside the home about 20-25 hours per week. I'm just ready to get out of the house, that's all. While I won't have the resume that I would have had if I hadn't stayed home, my freelance work does give me something to put on it, and I can truthfully say that I have been in the workforce for the last ten years. I feel pretty up to date on Office applications and so on, and I'm not worried about my ability to function in the workplace (though I definitely need a new wardrobe!)

So, my advice to you would be--don't go cold turkey! If you like to work, then work, just don't work full time, that's all. You didn't mention what your area of expertise is, but with all your experience, I am sure there is some way you can offer services to the business community. You might not make as much money as you were before, but there could be a lot of satisfaction in running your own shop and setting your own schedule.

There's also unpaid work--for example, all the hardcore PTA moms at my kids' schools are definitely type As! There are several charitable thrift stores in my area that are run by volunteers. All the museums in the DC area use volunteers as do the zoos, if you like animals. Those classes that are taught at the community centers and so on are taught by virtual volunteers--the pay is so little as to not be worth mentioning, but the teachers always seem to enjoy what they are doing. If you love books, you could work part-time in a library--again, pays practically nothing, but seems like a pleasant environment.

Finally, I want to mention that I have a GREAT relationship with my teenage daughter, and I think that is due in large part to having spent so much time with her, and knowing what's going on in her life. I wouldn't trade that for any amount of money, and I think you'll be very happy with your decision to invest your time in your daughter for the next few years.

bookaholic

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Author: epona4 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 964 of 974
Subject: Re: Transitions Date: 10/19/2006 6:03 PM
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bookaholic is already one of your Favorite Fools

Gee, I wonder why that is??!! ;)

As always, a fan.

b

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Author: bookaholic Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 965 of 974
Subject: Re: Transitions Date: 10/19/2006 7:18 PM
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As always, a fan.

Aw, shucks, thanks (:

bookaholic

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Author: MoneyPenny06 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 966 of 974
Subject: Re: Transitions Date: 10/19/2006 7:25 PM
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Thanks book :)


I appreciate the insight. I think that's the part I was worried about: cold turkey.

I've pretty much decided that I won't do anything over the late spring and summer - just get caught up on life, taking care of overdue things and of course spending more time with the girl. I think that beginning next fall, when she starts school again, I will look for something to do part time. I may volunteer at her school too. It's a small school, no PTA, etc - so they are grateful just to have folks show up and lend a hand. I am toying with the idea of going back to school to train for a new career.

We are very close also and I know I am going to miss her bunches when she goes off to college.

For better or worse, parenting has been as much of a job for me as my for-pay job and by that I mean, I have put the same energy and time into both, which I think explains our close relationship despite my working out of the home. That said......it has left little time for me or my marriage and my health, hobbies, etc.

So while I do want to spend more time with her...I also hope to catch up on these other areas.

You know how the grass always looks greener on the other side? I just hope it truly is greener :) I think working has been a part of my identity for a long time.

MP


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Author: bookaholic Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 967 of 974
Subject: Re: Transitions Date: 10/19/2006 8:33 PM
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That said......it has left little time for me or my marriage and my health, hobbies, etc. So while I do want to spend more time with her...I also hope to catch up on these other areas.

I'll let you in on a secret, MP. Every few weeks DH takes the day off and we have a day-long date while the kids are in school. Today, we drove out to a country town for shopping and lunch, and to see the autumn leaves along the way. Then we came back and stayed home for a while.

Days like this are not hard to arrange when only one person has to ask for time off!

Now you know why so many SAHMs of older kids are smiling (:

bookaholic

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