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Introduction.

http://www.foroenergy.com/company

Foro Energy is commercializing high power lasers for the oil, natural gas, geothermal, and mining industries.

Our unique capability and hardware platform to transmit high power lasers over long distance fiber optic cables enables step change performance in applications to drill, complete, and workover wells.

Launched in 2009, Foro Energy is built upon a decade of academic work at the Colorado School of Mines with a novel approach to bust through the “sound barrier” of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering that previously made it impossible to transmit high power lasers over long distance fiber optic cables. Soon thereafter, this innovation was recognized with a large award from the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARPA-E transformational energy technology program.


Time line of lasers.

http://www.foroenergy.com/timeline

Foro Energy has several big name investors and partners. This does not appear to be a fly by night operation. However, I currently see no investment avenue. However, I did not bring it up for investment.

The Foro site has some interesting information on it. A wide deployment of the technology can change the economics of all rock cutting, from Gold mining and Geothermal energy, to quarrying stone and building tunnels.

Very interesting.

Cheers
Qazulight (With monocle and heavy German accent in hand)
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(With monocle and heavy German accent in hand)
but stupid...

how much power would be need to power a laser for Gold mining and Geothermal energy, to quarrying stone and building tunnels and how would you get the power source in situ????

I think we are talking a few years hence before we can invest ??

Alan
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..(With monocle and heavy German accent in hand)
but stupid...



Beeery clever, Vulfgang! But I vud know you anyvere.

Cheers!
Murph
Home ( Loved Arte Johnson's Laugh-In acts ) Fool
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I remember watching a show, must be at least a decade ago, where they were demonstrating how high powered water could be used to cut everything from steak to solid rock.

I was left wondering at that time why we did not use such for drilling since it seemed like a clean option. No idea how much energy it took to create such.

Found this:

http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/questi...

A waterjet is a tool used in machine shops to cut metal parts with a (very) high-pressure stream of water. As amazing as it sounds, if you get water flowing fast enough it can actually cut metal.

Think of a waterjet as something with about 30 times the pressure of the power washer wand at your local car wash. Power washing at car washes is an everyday example of a dirt film being "cut" off the body, wheels and tires of an automobile.

The key to cutting metal with water is to keep the spray coherent. Waterjets are able to cut because the spray is channeled through a very narrow jeweled nozzle at a very high pressure to keep the spray coherent. Unlike metal cutters, a waterjet never gets dull and it cannot overheat.

Low pressure waterjets were first used for mining gold in California in 1852. Steam and hot water jets were used in the early 1900s for cleaning. High pressure waterjets were used for mining in the 1960s, and about 10 years ago industry began using waterjets for cutting. Abrasive water jets (abrasivejets) were first used in industry in about 1980.

...

A waterjet can remove the bark from a tree at a distance of 40 feet if one alters the chemistry of plain water by adding SUPER-WATER®, available from Berkeley Chemical Research. The SUPER-WATER® is a soluble polymeric chemical that acts like a series of molecular spinal columns or concrete reinforcement bars that tie the individual water molecules together in a more structured way to form a coherent jet. Imagine the potential for cutting down roadside weeds.

Abrasive jets have been used to:

•Remove materials inside train tunnels
•Help rescue "Baby Jessica" from the well in Midland, Texas
•Cut virtually any shape in bullet-proof glass
•Cut out the parts for the F-22 and Stealth bomber, and other aircraft and spacecraft
•Cut into the hull, using diamond powder abrasive, of the submarine Kursk to recover the bodies of the Russian crew

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how much power would be need to power a laser for Gold mining and Geothermal energy, to quarrying stone and building tunnels and how would you get the power source in situ????



I do not know how much power would be required, but the company seems to think they can get it into the ground.

We deliver multi-kW laser power over multi-mile distances.

In the past 15 years, high power fiber laser costs have dropped by 100X+ with modular, solid state construction for rugged field transportation. However, long distance transmission of high power lasers was believed to be impossible due to physics limitations known as Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) and other nonlinear effects.

Foro Energy’s proprietary technology overcomes these and other limitations to allow “world first” transmission of:

High power, by overcoming SBS
Over long distances, by overcoming SBS
With low loss, through a proprietary fiber optic specification
In downhole environments, through a proprietary cabling package


It looks like from the website that the first customer will be energy. That would make sense as the tight gas and oil requires many wells with multiple horizontal legs. There is a need for speed.

However, the Colorado school of mines is interested also. So, I suspect that there is a mining application.

I think we are talking a few years hence before we can invest ??

I think we are talking forever before we can invest. The two venture capital companies that are invested are not public. ARPA-E which is also invested is a government agency.

I suppose you could invest in Cheveron, ConocoPhillips, GE and NRG, but that would probably be like buying seawater for the gold.

I brought it up because in ground rock cutting sped up by a factor of four or more would have MACRO impacts. The spread of Fracking and recovering tight gas and oil could become very wide spread, depressing the price of oil and upsetting the current geopolitical and geoeconomic situation.

Where the Haynesville Shale was the first slip of the avalanche, this and other technologies are starting to snowball.

While finding more energy is good, and finding it spread around the world would be even better, and being able to produce at economy friendly prices is outstanding. The current economic structure depends on something completely different.

As investors we must be ahead of the curve. Not so much so that we can invest ahead of the curve, that is speculation, rather so we can be ready emotionally to make the choices when they finally appear in invest able forms.

Cheers
Qazulight
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