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Author: salaryguru Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 59800  
Subject: Turning cold again Date: 4/15/2012 12:23 AM
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Well . . . we had a very warm couple of weeks at the end of March/early April. Highs were well into the 80's every day. But it has cooled off again here in Phoenix. Today was cool all day and the temperature was below 60 when I went out to exercise Bubba the black lab at about 8:00 PM.

The cooler weather coaxed SGSpouse and I into expending significant energy to re-locate and document a very difficult to reach petroglyph site on the Agua Fria National Monument. We went with some equally insane archaeolics. We started with 7 people, but only 4 of us made it all the way to the site and back. To get to the site we drove about 1 - 1/2 hours north to the monument, then about 1 hour 4WD across a terribly bumpy and washed out two-track, then hike over the side of a cliff and down 980 feet with no trail. Amazingly, once we got down into Squaw Creek, we only had to explore for about 20 minutes before locating the rock art. We also found 6 previously undocumented ruins on our way down. Then we got to reverse the trip to get back home. We decided the route we took to get down was too difficult so we would try an alternative route out. That was a mistake. Our alternate route was even worse. But we did find and documented the site we were looking for and also took GPS points and some notes on artifact assemblages and approximate room counts of our six newly discovered ruins.

Here are some shots of the petroglyphs:

http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=6adeb3f5-c915-4e90-959e-...

http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=1ac90ed9-bb6e-4599-8c2e-...

http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=24f705f8-c7d9-4dcd-bd62-...

http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=88598afb-ece3-48b8-987d-...

http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=e0750bb3-6e3a-4500-9298-...

http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=afbf8285-acf8-4b72-b37c-...

http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=a33fa817-8538-4ceb-9574-...

and here's a pseudo-3D image of one of the boulders:

http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=d702cefb-0103-472b-a033-...
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Author: lindytoes Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42057 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/15/2012 7:24 PM
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Thanks so much for sharing the petroglyphs. I especially thought this was very cool:

salaryguru:
"and here's a pseudo-3D image of one of the boulders:"

http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=d702cefb-0103-472b-a033-......

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Author: vickifool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42063 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/15/2012 9:26 PM
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That is very cool.
I like that the animals look like 3 different kinds to me. The wavy lines are interesting--are they rain or lines of energy?

Vickifool

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Author: salaryguru Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42068 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/16/2012 2:51 AM
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Thanks so much for sharing the petroglyphs. I especially thought this was very cool:

salaryguru:
"and here's a pseudo-3D image of one of the boulders:"


This is just my second attempt to take photos to exploit this software. I now understand that I should have included more layers of photos at more vertical angles, especially on the top of the boulder. I'm still learning and can already see that I could do a better job now that I understand the software a little better. But I am pretty excited about the possibilities.

As far as I know, I am the first person applying this kind of capability to archaeology documentation. Archaeologists I've shown it to are pretty excited, so I think I'll get the chance to do a lot more of this in the future. By the way, the main reason I do this kind of work is because land managers and archaeologists tend to try to keep sites secret, but if you can offer them some kind of documentation that is useful to them, they are willing to share locations.

A lot of rock art is located on flat rock faces - like along a cliff. This technique is not needed, nor very useful for that. But for boulders with rock art on multiple faces, this kind of documentation could be very valuable.

Previous rock art documentation techniques usually fail to make it easy to comprehend how elements on one rock panel might relate to elements on another panel on the same or adjacent boulders.

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Author: salaryguru Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42069 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/16/2012 3:15 AM
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I like that the animals look like 3 different kinds to me. The wavy lines are interesting--are they rain or lines of energy?

Interesting observations. The short answer to your question is that nobody knows. But here's what I do know, and I think it might apply to your question.

The primary occupation of Perry Mesa (the location of these glyphs) was during the late 1100's. That's probably when these petroglyphs date to. A lot of changes were happening to the cultures in the Southwest at that time. There was a lot of migration going on and there is some indication of widespread warfare.

Whatever group moved onto Perry Mesa at this time had connections to the Hopi Mesas located about 200 miles Northeast of Perry Mesa. Perry Mesa is littered with Hopi yellow ware pottery sherds from the Hopi village of Awatovi. Most of the cultures that occupied southern Arizona prior to this time are impossible to track after about 1400, but the Hopi are still around. Most of the Hopi are traceable as part of the Western Anasazi who migrated from central Arizona to the Hopi Mesas around 1100 AD.

This rock art panel is interesting because several figures are typical of Hopi symbols. Some of the anthropomorphic figures are very similar to Hopi designs and rock art. We don't see much of that in Phoenix rock art.

So, now, getting back to your question - wavy lines are often used by Hopi to signify rain or lightening or the energy of the storm. So you may be right.

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Author: alstroemeria Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42071 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/16/2012 7:42 AM
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Turning cold again

Not in Manhattan. It's been unseasonably warm all winter and spring and is supposed to hit 86(!) today--and I set the weather station to Central Park, which is a bit cooler than the paved areas of the city (but is the station closest to me). I've been sleeping with the windows open for quite a few days now...but then, my ideal sleep temp is 60 (it didn;t get that cool last night.

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Author: alstroemeria Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42072 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/16/2012 8:08 AM
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SG, you have the most interesting retirement of anyone I know! Perhaps you would consider hosting an elder-hostel-ish tour of your local archeological sites for TMF friends? I plan to be out your way in late September, 2013 <hint-hint!> en meandery route from the Canadian Rockies/Pacific Northwest south through CA to the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta (but I would backtrack to AZ afterwards [mid-late October] for cooler weather.

The only person I think comes anywhere close in fascinating retirement is fleg9bo on the other TMF retirement board and his south-of-the-border home stays and work as a translator.

I lack ambition other than to cook, read, visit museums & nature centers in person and online, do a little fiddle playing, and plan & take RV trips...but then, that's why I love retirement! Like Joseph Campbell sez, Follow your bliss ;-)

"Follow your bliss"
One of Campbell's most identifiable, most quoted and arguably most misunderstood sayings was his admonition to "follow your bliss." He derived this idea from the Upanishads:

Now, I came to this idea of bliss because in Sanskrit, which is the great spiritual language of the world, there are three terms that represent the brink, the jumping-off place to the ocean of transcendence:Sat-Chit-Ananda. The word "Sat" means being. "Chit" means consciousness. "Ananda" means bliss or rapture. I thought, "I don't know whether my consciousness is proper consciousness or not; I don't know whether what I know of my being is my proper being or not; but I do know where my rapture is. So let me hang on to rapture, and that will bring me both my consciousness and my being." I think it worked.[49]
He saw this not merely as a mantra, but as a helpful guide to the individual along the hero journey that each of us walks through life:

If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. Wherever you are—if you are following your bliss, you are enjoying that refreshment, that life within you, all the time.[50]
Campbell began sharing this idea with students during his lectures in the 1970s. By the time that The Power of Myth was aired in 1988, six months following Campbell's death, "Follow your bliss" was a philosophy that resonated deeply with the American public—both religious and secular.[51]

During his later years, when some students took him to be encouraging hedonism, Campbell is reported to have grumbled, "I should have said, 'Follow your blisters.'"


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Campbell

SG, you certainly follow your bliss--and your blisters!

=alstro, in a bit of awe

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Author: PSUEngineer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42079 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/16/2012 12:08 PM
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Here are some shots of the petroglyphs:

I should post some petroglyphs that were in etched into the lava flows in Hawaii.

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Author: salaryguru Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42085 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/16/2012 2:16 PM
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Definitely let me know if you can make it to AZ this Fall. October is a pretty busy month for me. I have meetings in Paris, New Delhi and Amsterdam in October, but I should be home in between trips a little bit. October is usually very pleasant in Phoenix.

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Author: salaryguru Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42087 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/16/2012 2:25 PM
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I should post some petroglyphs that were in etched into the lava flows in Hawaii.

I would love to see them. SGSpouse and I have only visited Hawaii once, but here are some of our photos: http://www.golio.net/Hawaii.html. There are some petroglyphs and archaeology sites mixed in those photos - mostly in the last two links.

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Author: alstroemeria Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42092 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/16/2012 4:51 PM
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Definitely let me know if you can make it to AZ this Fall.

I can definitely say it's not this fall, but next fall (2013). (The hubster's teaching the 2012-2013 academic year--last one, though!)

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Author: PolymerMom Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42100 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/16/2012 10:57 PM
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SG,

What software are you using? Also, what camera? I currently use a Nikon P100, but have found several shortcomings when compared to my old Nikon FTN(film).

FWIW, MDH and I are heading to Estes Park in mid-August and hope to take a Landscape Photography class at the Rocky Mountain Nature Association.

http://www.rmna.org//rmna.cfm?Page=docs/1008_landscape_photo...

The instructor likes HDR software, which seems quite reasonable at $39 for the "basic" version. The idea is to take multiple exposures while varying the f-stop. Supposedly the software will then allow one to combine the best of the shots into one phenomenal, almost surreal, image. I believe the cover photo on the February issue of New Mexico Magazine is an example. Absolutely everything is in focus and properly lighted - hence the surreal description.

I noticed that the site you posted on had a warning that SilverLight would be installed for viewing. I'd prefer something less proprietary. (I've heard SilverLight may be going away.)

TIA,
PM

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Author: sykesix Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42101 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/16/2012 11:13 PM
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The instructor likes HDR software, which seems quite reasonable at $39 for the "basic" version. The idea is to take multiple exposures while varying the f-stop. Supposedly the software will then allow one to combine the best of the shots into one phenomenal, almost surreal, image. I believe the cover photo on the February issue of New Mexico Magazine is an example. Absolutely everything is in focus and properly lighted - hence the surreal description.

Photoshop and such all have HDR capabilities and newer cameras even do HDR in the camera, which pretty good results.

The HDR guru is Trey Rattcliff who has a free tutorial on his website:

http://www.stuckincustoms.com/hdr-tutorial/

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Author: salaryguru Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 42106 of 59800
Subject: Re: Turning cold again Date: 4/17/2012 1:36 AM
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What software are you using? Also, what camera?

Oh, I only use cheap (or free) stuff. My camera is a cheap, old Cannon point and shoot, PowerShot A590. For the documentation tasks I'm doing, a better camera only adds weight to my pack without much advantage. In fact, I could enhance the documentation quality over what I'm doing dramatically just by increasing the resolution setting on my existing camera. I have it set to moderate resolution now. SGSpouse carries a much more expensive, high end Cannon to take the pretty pictures. Sometimes she lets me use it.

So far I have only used free software. I like ICE, a free microsoft application for stitching linear photos together. ICE is incredibly versatile, quick, and easy to use. Over time you learn a few tricks to make it work better, but it is pretty easy to get impressive results on stitched panels or panorama shots right from the beginning. You need to overlap your photos by 40% to 60%. Then you simply upload them and tell ICE to go. You have to be a little bit disciplined to make sure you get enough overlap everywhere, but it doesn't take too long to get it right. You can improve resolution by photographing the overall stitched panorama with your camera in both standard position and twisted 90 degrees. Put all the photos together into ICE and it works out the solution. The problem with ICE is that it is difficult to share the results with someone who doesn't have ICE on their computer.

There are two solutions to the sharing problem. You can save your ICE stitched photo as a JPG file and send it, or ICE also provides an option to upload stitched results to Photosynth. This is not a very quick or versatile option, but that's what I've been using to share photos on the internet. Photosynth is not as versatile as ICE, but it provides me a url that I can send to people to access the photos. They don't have to own or know how to use ICE.

The pseudo 3-D photos are entirely Photosynth. I have worked with archaeologists who purchased very expensive true 3D photo software - programs that cost several thousand dollars and require many hours in the field plus many hours at the computer, but produce 3D models that are accurate to a fraction of a mm. In fact, I still am working on one of those projects, but I use their software to do that work. I'm really not interested in owning it myself. Frankly, I don't think it's worth the effort (certainly not worth the expense) and I think the archaeologists agree. They just can't say it to their supervisors who purchased the licenses and are paying for the documentation.

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