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Author: edcosoft Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 121261  
Subject: Re: Underpayment of estimated tax Date: 10/20/1999 12:54 AM
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Unfortunately you do not give enough information to give you specific instructions, however, presuming you have no wages to withhold from, and have other income, and are probably already paying installments:
IF you pay in enough installments to equal last year's tax (or 105% if you had AGI over $150K last year) you own nothing until April and no penalty will be due, UNLESS you didn't pay equal installments, or one wasn't on time. In that case, you MAY owe a penalty, but there is nothing you can do about it now. It will work out when you figure the Form 2210, and due to the Gain, it will behoove you to complete the Schedule AI also (annualized income method),if the gain was in the later part of the year.
If you havn't paid enough per above, the sooner you make up the difference the better.
Your penalty is simple interest of 8% for the time the installment payment(s) is late, so paying an extra $3,800 now (presuming it was due on 9/15 or earlier and you owe it all to equal 1998 taxes with your other installment payments) will save you about $152 (.08 X .5 X 3,800), and 1/2 that if you pay it with your January installment. You probably don't owe it all, though.

The other poster's comments that it doesn't make any difference because your installments are on "periods" is only half applicable. The payment isn't due until a specific date, but the penalty only applies from that date until the date you pay it. He's right about
applying payments to past-due installment first, but that doesn't affect the amount of the penalty, it only makes you think you don't owe a penalty. Whenever it was due, you're stopping the interest from running when you pay the $3,800.

Sorry I couldn't give you better advice, but would have to know when the Gain occured, your other paid installments, last year's taxes, and maybe more.

Note that you may have overpaid earlier installments without knowing it because there are three "safe harbors" that could apply to each instalmment. Also, it will do you no good to pay total installments more than last year's taxes, or 90% of this year's taxes.
We publish a quarterly tax calculator on www.edcosoft.com that will compute all this for you for each installment when due, however, TurboTax will do it with your final return (retrospectively).
Ed
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