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Author: MadAmos One star, 50 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 128206  
Subject: Unlabled circut breakers Date: 1/12/2004 3:11 PM
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In our den, we have 2 baseboard heaters running on the walls. They are wired to a central thermostat, and Intermatic timer.
Something has broken in this chain. The timer doesn't keep time (clock doesn't update) and the baseboard heaters will no longer turn on.

I have already check the circut breakers, and all looks ok. Unfortunately the circut breakers are not labled, so I don't know which one(s) are for the baseboard heaters, but no breakers have tripped.

I don't know where the issue is. I would think it must either be the thermostat or the timer that is broken, therefore keeping electricty flowing to the rest of the system.

I am hesitant to do much else without being able to identify the proper circut breaker. Anyone have a way to tell? Is there some way for me to test the line before it reaches either the thermostat or timer to make sure there is a current (or lack of current) running through the system?

I won't hesitate to call an expert if needed, but I am trying to avoid that if the problem is simple.

Thanks.

MadAmos
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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 44528 of 128206
Subject: Re: Unlabled circut breakers Date: 1/12/2004 3:35 PM
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Anyone have a way to tell? Is there some way for me to test the line before it reaches either the thermostat or timer to make sure there is a current (or lack of current) running through the system?

You can get a 120 volt simple circuit tester many places for only a few dollars many - Radio Shack should have them.


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Author: AngryPuppy Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 44530 of 128206
Subject: Re: Unlabled circut breakers Date: 1/12/2004 3:40 PM
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Check for "popped" GFI outlets. Sometimes things are wired through those. Also, breakers may not always look like they've popped. You may have to cycle all your breakers on and off at least once.

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Author: kathcolo Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 44535 of 128206
Subject: Re: Unlabled circut breakers Date: 1/12/2004 6:30 PM
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>>You may have to cycle all your breakers on and off at least once.<<

And, when doing that, have someone in the house checking to see what shut off so that you can newly label them.

Kath
make it easier for the next time

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Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 44565 of 128206
Subject: Re: Unlabled circut breakers Date: 1/13/2004 1:37 PM
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I should think the first thing to do it see if you can get into the heater control panel and see how its wired.

If you have a wall thermostat controlling the heaters, there is almost certainly a thermostat wire to the heaters. The thermostat can be wired various ways, but most of them connect to a transformer somewhere for power. Your problem could be as simple as a bad transformer. Usually 12 or 24 v. How many wires to your thermostat? Do they have power?

The thermostat should trip a relay (or its solid state equivalent) someplace to turn on the main power. Shorting the thermostat leads should turn on the heat if the relay is in the heater control box. If that works, then you have either a bad thermostat or a bad connection in your thermostat wiring.

Your heaters are probably 220v. That means they will work on double circuit breakers usually. You probably don't have too many of those: air conditioning, electric range, electric dryer, electric water heater. Sort 'em out.

Oh, and don't forget some thermostats have rechargeable batteries for backup. Could be your batteries need replacing.

Best of luck.

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