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Author: Goofyhoofy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 128264  
Subject: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/24/2002 11:40 AM
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This one was new to me, maybe you've seen it so it isn't to you. Dunno.

I was in Boston supervising the installation of a new kitchen in a rental property we have there. The cabinets went in a different configuration, leaving a couple of holes in the wall which at one time, I guess, were for electric service for shelf lights or something.

Anyway, as I was struggling with patching the holes, reinforcing the back, etc. one of the contractors says to me, "Oh, you're making it much too hard. Do this." I did, and it worked great.

Basically, you square out the hole. Doesn't really matter to what size, let's say it ends up being the size of a paperback book.

You cut a piece of scrap drywall the size of the paperback book plus 1"-2" on every side. A 4x6 book becomes a 6x8 patch piece, OK?

Now turn the patch piece upside down, center your "imaginary paperback book" and score the patch it to the size of the paperback book minus a quarter to a half inch on each side. Now break the piece along the score, and peel away the edges from the paper on the front of the piece. Do this on all four sides.

You will now have a piece of drywall just small enough to "put in the hole", and it will have "wings" on all four sides, ready for basting.

Put some mud on the wall, put the patch in the wall, put some mud over the wings, voila. You push the wings down into the mud, just as you would when joining two pieces with tape. It dries. You sand. You're done.

I did it on two pieces, one small (2x2) one fairly large (6x8). I asked the guy "how big can you do this?" He replied "as big as you want, within reason." He said he'd done them as big as 2 foot by 2 foot (which also puts it across a stud, which he screwed into for support.)

It sure saved me a bunch of time putting braces behind the roughed opening, then putting a patch in place, then screwing the patch to the braces, then mudding up, putting tape along the edges, etc. etc. etc.

Just thought I'd pass it along, since I've been doing it for 30 years the other way - and thought maybe you have too. If this is for a piece of wall which requires a lot of structure - like where a doorknob smashes it, this is probably not appropriate. But for over a kitchen counter or along a wall where a tenant has smashed a hole hanging a picture, it's great!
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Author: jiml8 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25532 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/24/2002 12:28 PM
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cool idea. It'll save some time.

If this is for a piece of wall which requires a lot of structure - like where a doorknob smashes it, this is probably not appropriate.

Here's how you do that, using a close variant of your technique. We have a lot of ceramic tile bathrooms and a common problem involves the ceramic soap dish falling off, usually due ultimately to the failure of the tenant to perform routine maintenance to keep the bathroom clean. Typically by the time this happens, there is serious damage to the drywall right behind the soap dish, and often the damage is very localized. If the tile around the soap dish is secure, then obviously we don't want to get into removing it to repair the wall. So we punch out the rotten drywall, then get some newspaper and stuff it into the wall all around the hole so that it fills the space inside the wall around the hole, leaving just the hole itself, which is clear of newspaper. Then we get some lath, or a paint stick, or something similar and work it into the hole so that it is held against the back of the damaged drywall and spans the hole. We apply some construction adhesive to the stick, thus gluing it to the back of the drywall.

Then, we get a can of expanding foam and fill the space inside the hole. Here is where the newspaper is needed; it forms a mold, basically, that keeps the foam where we want it and allows it to completely fill the hole. Then we go away.

When we come back, we cut off the foam that has bulged out of the wall, and cut it back to the depth of the back of the drywall. We then make a drywall patch the size of the hole, and put it in place. Construction adhesive glues it to some degree to the expanding foam, and a screw or two through the lath stick secures the drywall patch thoroughly. Patch the seam in the drywall, reattach the soap dish, and grout it in.

This plan also works very well on a wall where a doorknob hits. It adds considerable strength to the wall because the foam makes it solid and takes the shock.



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Author: ptheland Big gold star, 5000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25533 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/24/2002 12:49 PM
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Then we get some lath, or a paint stick, or something similar and work it into the hole so that it is held against the back of the damaged drywall and spans the hole. We apply some construction adhesive to the stick, thus gluing it to the back of the drywall.

I've seen just this part used before for a small patch. Used something a bit thicker than a paint stick - any scrap up to say a 1x2. Cut the stick about 4 inches longer than the hole, and slip it through the hole. Screw it in above and below the hole, then screw the drywall patch to the stick. Mud and tape as usual.

I suspect it would be a bit sturdier than DIMS's shortcut, and quicker (but not as solid) than jim18's.

--Peter

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Author: BPEZ317 Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25534 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/24/2002 1:09 PM
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If you ever get the chance to watch a pro you'll be amazed.

I watched a crew of 3 hang 90 sheets in 1 day. 5 days later they were ready for paint.

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Author: rsprang Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25538 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/24/2002 4:41 PM
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They show that 'trick' on Hometime often. It's a good technique.

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Author: Goofyhoofy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25540 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/24/2002 6:01 PM
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They show that 'trick' on Hometime often

That's a surprise. I think I've seen every episode and I don't recall it. I've also seen a bazillion Bob Vila's and most of the other shows (Jon Eakes!) and the like, and this was a new one for me. Well, as I said, if you already knew it, why didn't you tell me about it earlier!!! <grin>

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Author: shawnmc Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25546 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/24/2002 10:47 PM
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Good tip, thanks

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Author: rsprang Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25551 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/25/2002 8:10 AM
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Well, as I said, if you already knew it, why didn't you tell me about it earlier!!!

Sorry, just thought everyone knew that one ;)

They used to show that trick, and the "paint stirrer stick screwed to the wall behind to support the patch" trick quite often when Hometime was on PBS. Not sure I have watched it since then.

rsprang
who is STILL trying to remember the name of the first cohost on Hometime - the one who quit to become a comedian. I think she was replaced by Robin Hartl.

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Author: Goofyhoofy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25556 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/25/2002 9:34 AM
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rsprang
who is STILL trying to remember the name of the first cohost on Hometime - the one who quit to become a comedian. I think she was replaced by Robin Hartl.


JoAnne Liebler. Actually she was a comedian before, during, and after the show, although she's not really that funny. She now has a show on HGTV and I see her occasionally on a different program (not Hometime) on TLC, I believe.

Dean's other "wives" have included Susan Egli and Peggy Knapp. If you knew him, according to all reports, you'd know why he's had four "wives." <grin>

They used to show that trick, and the "paint stirrer stick screwed to the wall behind to support the patch" trick quite often when Hometime was on PBS

Well that's the trick I've been using for 30 years, except I found that a paint stirrer was too thin to be of much use with drywall screws, and split too easily. So I went to pieces of firring strip or 1x anything.

But the "no wood at all" is faster, and it seems to me, stronger, since it bonds on all four sides to the actual wall.

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Author: jiml8 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25557 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/25/2002 9:37 AM
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But the "no wood at all" is faster, and it seems to me, stronger, since it bonds on all four sides to the actual wall.

The foam's the thing. That's where you get the strength.

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Author: DiamondDave2005 Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25572 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/25/2002 8:28 PM
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You know, I read this in Handyman magazine a few months back, although I don't remember whether it was a tip from a reader or just part of an article.
I just did this two weeks ago when I was painting our dining room, and decided that the defunct humidifer controller and fan controller from 1959 had to go.
It works great!
One tip - when you apply the new pieces of sheetrock, use something with a straight edge bigger that the hole to make sure you're level with the existing wall surface. I could see one of my patches was not quite even when I painted it, but unless you know it's there you really can't tell.
Dave

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Author: lpdcac Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25612 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 7/27/2002 10:06 AM
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Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick
Author: Goofyhoofy
Date: 7/25/02 9:34 AM
Number: 25556

Well that's the trick I've been using for 30 years, except I found that a paint stirrer was too thin to be of much use with drywall screws, and split too easily. So I went to pieces of firring strip or 1x anything.

But the "no wood at all" is faster, and it seems to me, stronger, since it bonds on all four sides to the actual wall.

=====================================
"No wood at all" may be faster but I can't imagine it's as secure and as strong as having a solid backup for the patch. You can still use the "wings" patch method; the only extra time is attaching the wood strip (oh yeah, snapping the wood piece across your knee to get it to size too)<g>.

Phil_D


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Author: lexx6 Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25797 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 8/1/2002 2:28 PM
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Thank-you so much for the drywall trick - I've been a white duct taper for these things and just didn't know how to really fix it!

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Author: hallfam Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 26406 of 128264
Subject: Re: Very cool drywall trick Date: 8/14/2002 4:12 PM
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Thanks for sharing the "drywall trick". An Electrician showed me this trick abour 20 years ago. I've blessed him many times since. May you also reap many good thoughts from those who will profit from your "trick".

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