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I just watched a TV report (first released in 1997, Arte TV) about Gary Kasparov (Chess World champion) and I was surprised to find some similarities (sorry, biased view !) with Warren Buffett :

[In no particular order]

1) An exceptional memory for numbers.
Kasparov remembers all the numbers and all the dates which he read, all the phone numbers he dialed and all the chess games he made (even the simoultaneous games !).
In Chess, a grand master can have in memory 1000 openings [= different patterns from older games]. Kasparov has around 10000 openings in his head !
Kasparov prefers not to talk about this subject because for him its gift does not explain at all his success.

2) Forget the wrong ways.
kasparov computes in a way that he rules out 99% of the bad possibilities.

It becomes faster and faster to decide each time he has more experience.

In a complex game, at each moment, a great player(=kasparov) will have 3 or 4 possibilities of logic move.
This become 9 or 10 possibilities for an average player.
And 20 or 30 possibilities for a computer (because he looks at all the possibilities from a rules point of view).

3) No emotion when playing.
The mental philosophy of kasparov when he is playing chess reflects no emotion.
kasparov is known by his competitors to have a "cold" face.
In fact kasparov does not want to be distracted by his competitors attitude.
He thinks : "I don't care about what my competitors are thinking about." His motto is : "If I play well, I don't care about what they [competitors] think, I win. It is why that for me, my personal feelings, my will, my mind are more inportant than everything else when I am playing Chess."

4) Leader in his field.
kasparov is Leader since 1985 in the world championship game of Chess.
He lost only two times (1997 and 2000).

5) Starting young and work hard (training) in his 'circle of competence'.
kasparov starts playing chess without even knowing the rules ! He was 6 years old.
kasparov is training at Chess every day since then (He is helped by 2 coachs and 3 computers).

6) Share his knowledge with others.
kasparov wants to make Chess games a sport wordly known like tennis games.
For instance, he always tried to utilized computers in order to popularize Chess.
He also travels 7 months a year around the world for sharing his knowledge with other players.


I must add something for those who think that kasparov and Warren Buffett are "non-human" persons. For sure, they are great persons. But, they also make sometimes some errors (in their field and even also in their personal life) !

Note: Please accept my apologies if in what I wrote, something is not exactly accurate in a chess game point of view, because I do not know how to play chess ! Anyway, I tried to make part of the transcipt (and the translation from french) of this Tv report as correct as possible.

;-)
See you,
Futile
BRK NEWS http://www.egroups.com/group/brknews
http://www.ifrance.com/futile/
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Hi FF:

Liked your post...but the "fly-in-the-ointment" part of me begs to differ a tad about this comment:

3) No emotion when playing.
The mental philosophy of Kasparov when he is playing chess reflects no
emotion.
Kasparov is known by his competitors to have a "cold" face.


More so than other recent great masters (Karpov, and the guy who just beat Kasparov - Kramnik), Kasparov uses intimidation, grunts, agitation and other "body language" when playing - to un-nerve his opponents.

Karpov was/is a blank wall. Kramnik (former protege and training partner of Kasparov) appears to be able to block out the stares, and death-rays which Kasparov emits.

In the recent World Championship, Garry Kasparov commented that he was "totally out-prepared," and "burned down" by Kramnik.

Somehow, I can't imagine WEB saying that about, say, James Kramer.

Euro :)




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Dear FutileFrance,

Just to echo eurotrash.

I hope WEB isn't Kasparov, as Kasparov is no longer champion.

Incidentally, while Kasparov is one of the all-time greats to be sure, he has never struck me as very modest. If he loses, it is because of something he did (was ill-prepared, had a bad day), never because his opponent may actually be a good player. WEB seems to be infinitely more modest.

Best,

Lleweilun Smith
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Dear Eurotrash and Jmls,

Thank you for your answers. Indeed, you're both right ;-).

I must have erased the two first phrases of my thrid point.
Which becomes :

3) No emotion when playing.
Kasparov does not want to be distracted by his competitors attitude.
He thinks : "I don't care about what my competitors are thinking about." His motto is : "If I play well, I don't care about what they [competitors] think, I win. It is why that for me, my personal feelings, my will, my mind are more inportant than everything else when I am playing Chess."


I was just thinking for this similarity : Warren Buffett looks carefully at the numbers of a company and forgets the emotion of the markets moves.

I must also add that Warren Buffett and Gary Kasparov have also major differences. For instance, Kasparov is not a good businessman [it is what his agent thinks of him!], Kasparov seems not to be a modest person, moreover, he seems to have disrespects for his competitors by disturbing them,...etc...

Thank you again,
See you,
FutileFrance
BRK NEWS http://www.egroups.com/group/brknews
http://www.ifrance.com/futile/
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The comparison is impossible.Each is the result of
totally different cultures.WEB represents all the
positive side of capitalism.Kasparov is the child
of a repressive system.IMHO Kasparov needs help!
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Problem with people is they are rather unique, each in their own way, for good or for evil.

And so for K and WEB.

Interesting observations though, thanks FF.
G
Dr_e
====
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FutileFrance writes:

In Chess, a grand master can have in memory 1000 openings [= different patterns from older games]. Kasparov has around 10000 openings in his head !
Kasparov prefers not to talk about this subject because for him its gift does not explain at all his success.


I disagree: One of Kasparov's major advantages has been his theoretical knowledge and preparation, aided by his exceptional memory. Kasparov is not considered to be a better player in the strategical middle-game than the other top grandmasters, which Kramnik proved just recently when he was prepared just as well (or even better) and subsequently outplayed Kasparov, who was thought to be very tough to beat in a match.

In a complex game, at each moment, a great player(=kasparov) will have 3 or 4 possibilities of logic move. This become 9 or 10 possibilities for an average player.

The above is true for any grandmaster vs. any club player (myself included ;->).

No emotion when playing. The mental philosophy of kasparov when he is playing chess reflects no emotion.

Huh? I've never seen anyone making more funny (or silly, depending how you look at it) faces than Kasparov. :-)

For sure, they are great persons.

Um, I'd agree that Kasparov is one of the greatest chess players that ever lived (or even the greatest), but his character is, well, not easy to handle. WEB strikes me as being very different from Kasparov, actually.

Cheers,
Matt
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In Chess, a grand master can have in memory 1000 openings [= different patterns from older games]. Kasparov has around 10000 openings in his head !


Wondering if it gets breezy in there...
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