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Hi,

We are considering the purchase of a home that has its' own well and water rights. We are looking at paying the cost of the house inspection as well as a possible structural engineering analysis (it's an older home).

Is it unheard of for the seller to pay to have the well tested since we are paying for the inspection? What about the engineer's structural analysis of the property?

Thanks for any information...
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I guess it depends on your area. In CA, it is considered customary for the buyer to pay for all inspections, with the exception of pest.

One could argue the reasoning is the seller discloses (or is supposed to disclose) all defects, and it is up to the buyer to verify the validity of such by performing necessary inspections to satisfy the buyer's requirements.

In some instances, I even suggest that buyers pay to have a camera inserted into the sewer line to check for blockage and tar paper pipes. That type of inspection costs $99, but it's well worth finding out if there are any problems before the escrow closes.

In your case, if your inspections turn up problems with the well water or show structural integrity defects of the property, then if you have a contingency for said inspections in the contract, you can either walk from the deal (and receive your deposit back) or ask the seller to remedy the situation.

elizabeth
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I think you should hire those services. But you can always ask.

nmckay
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Thanks for both your feedback!

We have been calling around today and it's not very expensive. The thing that we have been burned with in the past though is outlaying the expense of inspections and then having them expose problems. Those problems aren't always negotiable so then you end up losing the cost of the inspections.

Last year we put a contract on a property with contingencies on the inspection. The inspection showed a structural defect in the deck of the property that would have to be rebuilt. Cost was $20k. Seller refused so we ended up losing money for both the normal inspection and the structural engineer. It was about $500 all told. :(

Anyway...I digress. Thanks.

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The thing that we have been burned with in the past though is outlaying the expense of inspections and then having them expose problems. Those problems aren't always negotiable so then you end up losing the cost of the inspections.

But that's the point of a home inspection. It's information for you; it's disclosing defects to you. I mean, if you'd rather not know about a problem the seller won't pay to remedy, then don't get a report, but that's sort of counter productive. If it were me, I'd rather know than not know, even if I can't get the seller to fix it.

But more important, it's also ammunition that might make me walk from a deal. Look at xraymd at her mold problems that she walked away from. Where would she had been if she had not requested an inspection? And that was a situation where the seller was willing to cough up money to fix. Your reasoning confuses me but then, sometimes I'm easily confused.

elizabeth
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tigemac: "The thing that we have been burned with in the past though is outlaying the expense of inspections and then having them expose problems. Those problems aren't always negotiable so then you end up losing the cost of the inspections.

Last year we put a contract on a property with contingencies on the inspection. The inspection showed a structural defect in the deck of the property that would have to be rebuilt. Cost was $20k. Seller refused so we ended up losing money for both the normal inspection and the structural engineer. It was about $500 all told."


I am with elizabeth on this one; you are looking at is bass ackwards.

You did not burned the cost of the inspections, you saved yourself thousands of dollars in unnecessary expenses by avoiding problem properties.

If you want to avoid the inspection expenses, that is easy, just skip the inspections, but then you have to live with the results and not moan about large expenses you incurred because you skipped the inspections.

If you think about it some more, you might appreciate your good fortune.

Regards, JAFO


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