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Author: jesever Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 5687  
Subject: Re: My son, the picky eater (long) Date: 10/12/2000 10:46 AM
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What a good mom for at least trying!!!

I don't have any kids myself, so I only speak from observation and no actual experience--other than having been a kid (in the distant past.....).

First of all, it sounds like he is still getting better nutrition than most kids his age. So many of my friends have kids who refuse to eat anything but chicken nuggets and french fries, or peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, or grilled cheese. The fact that he will at least eat a lettuce salad is, I think, fantastic!

I think if I had a kid like this, I would just try to make sure to at least have something on hand that he will eat. Maybe getting him involved in actually cooking food might make him more interested in eating it, too. I know when I was a kid I thought I didn't like certain things, but when I actually helped my mom prepare food, even if I thought I didn't like it, being involved in the prep work piqued my interest to try stuff and sometimes I even ended up liking it! (Now I like everything!).

Plus, we had a rule in our house that you had to at least try one bite of everything my mom cooked (except when she cooked liver for my dad--we were all exempt from the "one bite rule"--thank God!). If we at least ate a bite, we were welcome to eat whatever was on the table in whatever quantities. (IE, if we just wanted to eat mashed potatoes, after trying one bite of everything else, it was OK).

I think it's great you don't force him to eat anything. You're right, he's more likely to go the other way if you do. And if he eats some meat at school or a friend's house--well, I guess everyone, even a 10 year old, should be allowed to make some of his own decisions. If he eats some of that stuff now (not in your house, of course), he may eventually come to appreciate your vegetarian values and meals more because he has something to compare it to.

He's not dying of starvation, and he is still getting, like I said, probably better nutrition than most of his peers who eat nothing but junk food.

My brother was the pickiest eater in the whole world. We weren't raised veg, but we always had lots of veggies. One week he hated green beans, the next week it was peas, and it seemed like he hated whatever was on the table. But for about 2 years, his favorite snack was a ketchup sandwich. Go figure! But he grew up (fairly!) normal, and now he eats everything.

Good luck.

Janet
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