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Can anyone give me info or a site where I can find out more about the 403b? I am in education and think I may be eligible for these, or would I be better off with ira investing in rp4? I can only find info on 401k.

Anyone with info or site out there?

Thanking you Fools ahead of time,

j-bird
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403b's are similar to 401k's. The investing principles are basically the same, at least for the Foolish investor. Read the Fool's info on 401k's and index funds, and apply it to the 403b. These can be found in the Retirement section:
http://www.fool.com/retirement.htm

One thing about 403b's - they cannot by law invest in individual stocks, only in mutual funds and/or annuities. Most annuities are very high-priced, and most people do not need them. Read the Fools pages on annuities in the retirement section.

I recommend that you go back through the posts and read up on 403b's. Type in 403b, and then read back through the posts. You will find a good number of posts concerning 403b's.

Taylor
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"403b s are alot like 401k s."

Thanks fo much for the info. Have gone back and read lots of the 403b sites- very informative. Had read a few,but I had not gone back far enough.

j-bird
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Can anyone give me info or a site where I can find out more about the 403b? I am in education and think I may be
eligible for these, or would I be better off with ira investing in rp4? I can only find info on 401k.


Not sure what you are asking. Your employer has to offer the program. If the employer does then they set the entry rules. So start with your employer.

If you have to pick annuities for investments their expense might be high and you might be better off outside of the 403b. This will take some spread sheet analysis.

Remember, the employer plan will take the money out of your check each week. Will you do the same if you are not in a 403b? If not the 403b may still be a good deal.
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As was mentioned previously, you should be able to find out if you are eligible for a 403B by checking with your employer. Some education employers have standard pensions and do not offer 403B's. Amplifying on what was said earlier about annuities, if you DO have a 403B plan at work AND the choices are restricted to annuities (as many 403B plans are), see if your plan offers TIAA-CREF retirement annuities. In my opinion, if you gotta be in an annuity, TIAA-CREF is the way to go - low expenses, non-profit organization, very respected in the financial community. www.tiaa-cref.org for more info.

jtmitch
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<<One thing about 403b's - they cannot by law invest in individual stocks, only in mutual funds and/or annuities>>>

I have an employer 403b (non profit hospital) with very limited mutual fund choices. I am transferring money from my employer 403b to a Schwab Personal Choice Retirement Account.

They offer many more mutual fund options. However, I'd really like to self direct this account and invest in individual stocks.

My Question: is it true that one cannot invest 403b money in individual stocks as stated above?

this is news to me....

thanks,

tie dye tri guy
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Greetings, tie dye tri guy, and welcome. You asked:

<<My Question: is it true that one cannot invest 403b money in individual stocks as stated above?>>

Yes, it is true while you are working for the employer through whom the 403b plan is available. When you leave that job, then the 403b money may be transferred to a self-directed IRA within which you may trade in individual stocks. Until then, you are limited to an investment in annuities and/or mutual funds only.

Regards..Pixy
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guy -

Usually when transferring funds out of a 403b account, one needs to meet certain requirements: death, disability, age 59 1/2, retirement, separation from service, or hardship. These are the "triggers" that permit withdrawals (to cash, to IRA's, or to other 403b plans).

Check on the rules... :)

Best wishes, PP

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