No. of Recommendations: 3
Ok, I feel for people who have had a tough time but what happened to following the rules?

Two stories that have gotten my attention in the past few days are:

1) Military victims of the Ft. Hood incident are saying they are being treated unfairly by the military. At least 2 of the soldiers who were wounded are demanding they be awarded the Purple Heart and claiming that they have been denied tens of thousands of dollars in health care and retirement pay because of it. Some have filed a federal law suit against the Army. Is it me or is it VERY clear what the qualifications are for a Purple Heart? One ex-soldier who was interviewed said, "They're treating me like I just got hit by a car downtown instead of being shot by a terrorist." Yeah, I feel bad for him and others but they don't qualify for the Pruple Heart as far as I know. Some Congress Critters are saying they are going to submit legislation to get these people extra money and benefits. Ok, the government paid 9/11 survivors lots of money so I guess we should be paying the Ft. Hood victims as well?

2) An ex Navy SEAL who claims to be the one who "shot Bin Laden" is saying he's been abandoned by the Navy. He "retired" after 16 years and evidently expected to be paid as though he served 20. Yeah, it's tough to be in SpecOps for the full 20 but why not go for a medical discharge if you think you qualify? Why quit after 16 then b!ch about it to the press?

On a side note pertaining to the lax discipline in todays military, yesterday at the Post Office I saw a female soldier out-processing. She was in uniform but had on athletic walking shoes with RED SHOE LACES! Ok, if the shoes are tan (same as the boots and chucks) with tan laces I could see someone getting away with it, but RED LACES?!

Sorry for the rant.

Calabogie
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To be fair, there are a number of issues with the Esquire article you are referencing in #2. There are discrepancies on key issues as to services between the print and online editions, and some disputes as to what "he" said and whether the author when too far with his editorializing voice:

e.g, someone in an interview says this: "I quit after 16 years and received no benefits. I knew that would happen, but still, it was worth it in the cost/benefit analysis"

Becomes this: "I quit after 16 years and received no benefits." Isn't that unfair?

All I am saying is that these folks may not be whining as much as they are being portrayed as...
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Your inner lifer is rearing its ugly head.....

My buddies and I were discussing the SEAL and decided it sounds like a great reason to re-enlist, and quickly.

e.j.
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Please keep in mind, we don't know to what extent physical demands during his service have taxed his body, and I personally believe if he didn't think he could be there for his teammates, he withdrew from completing what is for some, 20 years of service.
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"She was in uniform but had on athletic walking shoes with RED SHOE LACES! ..."

What with the swan song order of Leon Panetta that put women into combat roles, the days of pink helmets is not that far away.

~aj
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Do the victims Major Hassan deserve Purple Hearts? I'd say they do; they were shot by an individual who did what he did out of sympathy for al Qaeda and jihadis everywhere. He was in contact with Anwar al-Awlaki, an individual the president saw fit to take out with a drone strike. This was not simply a case of a disgruntled worker going postal. The Fort Hood victims were the victims of a terrorist as surely as those injured in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Regarding the Seal, I do have to agree with you. The first thing that's ingrained into anyone who joins the military is that 20 is the magic number. If, after 16 years, he could no longer handle the physical demands of being a Seal, I'm sure he could've found something else to do to finish off his 20. Being an instructor for Seal recruits immediately comes to mind. Somehow, I don't think the Navy would go out of its way to stiff one of its heroes.
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Do the victims Major Hassan deserve Purple Hearts? I'd say they do; they were shot by an individual who did what he did out of sympathy for al Qaeda and jihadis everywhere. He was in contact with Anwar al-Awlaki, an individual the president saw fit to take out with a drone strike. This was not simply a case of a disgruntled worker going postal. The Fort Hood victims were the victims of a terrorist as surely as those injured in Afghanistan and Iraq.

I don't know the answer to this question but did military personnel in uniform at the WTC or the Pentagon on 9/11 get Purple Hearts? If so, then I think you may have a point. If not then those at Ft. Hood shouldn't get them either.

I was wounded by people who wanted to kill Americans while serving in a non-combat zone. I did not qualify for a Purple Heart and it didn't bother me because I knew the rules. Would that change if?

Calabogie
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I don't know the answer to this question but did military personnel in uniform at the WTC or the Pentagon on 9/11 get Purple Hearts? If so, then I think you may have a point. If not then those at Ft. Hood shouldn't get them either.

Good point. I would argue that military personnel killed or wounded during 9/11 should receive Purple Hearts as well, given that they were attacked by enemy combatants.

What was the situation in your case?
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The Situation was less Dire when President Jefferson formed the U.S. Marine Corp and Stormed Norte Africa, eliminating this Borg the first time.


http://news.yahoo.com/timbuktu-al-qaida-left-behind-manifest...
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"Good point. I would argue that military personnel killed or wounded during 9/11 should receive Purple Hearts as well, given that they were attacked by enemy combatants. ..."
.................................................

The Perps don't fall into the "Enemy Combatants" category as defined by Intl Treaty.


"Illegal Combatants"

Totally Eliminate ->Any Military "Police Actions"<-
Demand "Congressional Declaration of War",
to apply-> "Use of Military Force".
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"Good point. I would argue that military personnel killed or wounded during 9/11 should receive Purple Hearts as well, given that they were attacked by enemy combatants. ..."


<sarcasm>
Did the sailors at Pearl Harbor on Dec 7, 1941 receive Purple Hearts? After all, technically, we weren't "officially" at war with Japan yet.
</sarcasm>

justacog
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Good point. I would argue that military personnel killed or wounded during 9/11 should receive Purple Hearts as well, given that they were attacked by enemy combatants.

It took a bit of digging but I did find out that active and reserve military in the Pentagon who were wounded on 9/11/01 were indeed awarded the Purple Heart. Civilians were awarded the Defense of Freedom medal. While searching I also found that soldiers killed or wounded in the Berlin disco bombing were also awarded Purple Hearts.

Given that, it would seem right that those wounded at Ft. Hood should also receive the same. Soldiers and civilians should receive the appropriate awards.

What was the situation in your case?

I was wounded by what we called "bandits" while serving in a remote location in 1980. I was on duty and they were firing from just outside the fence and 2 of us were hit. Mine was minor but my buddy had to be medevac'ed and had a rough time of it. He was medically discharged about a year later. The 13 months I was at that location, 87 US service men were killed and more than 200 wounded in that country, some by bombs and others by "bandit" attacks but none received a Purple Heart. I asked about it once and was told we weren't "at war" with anyone and it could only be authorized during war time.

Calabogie
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The 13 months I was at that location, 87 US service men were killed and more than 200 wounded in that country...

Sadly, it sounds like you and your comrades were severely shortchanged. Perhaps this is something that can still be appealed?
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