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There are many people who can live anywhere they want either because they are retired or they can work from anywhere. Many are still very active.

My question regards how to generate a list of excellent relocation prospects for such a person. Is there a WEB resource for screening potential cities/towns? I imagine something similar to a stock screener.

My screen would be something like:

1) Population between 5 and 15 thousand
2) College town a plus
3) Median home price less than $150,000
4) Four seasons

Also, if anyone can suggest a place, that would be great. I am looking for smallish town but not too rural with nice nature (no deserts, I like trees).

Regards,
Bruce
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<< Also, if anyone can suggest a place, that would be great. >>

Of the top of my head, take a look at Greencastle, IN. I'm not sure of the population, but it's pretty small. I'd think it would meet your other criteria.

I don't know of a Web source, but Mr. Rand & Mr. McNally could be quite helpful. Kansas, Missouri, and Iowa are riddled with small college towns, and all have four seasons. The colleges are easy to spot on a map. If that part of the country interests you at all, you could spend some time driving around visiting them.

TMF ExRO
Phil Marti
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<<My screen would be something like:

1) Population between 5 and 15 thousand
2) College town a plus
3) Median home price less than $150,000
4) Four seasons>>

From what I've seen, colleges drive up cost of local housing, but I think you've got a great idea. One thing you could do is surf around college web sites. Often they will have info about community.
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Also, you might add to your screen, no state income tax
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Try "undiscovered" Weaverville 6 miles north of Asheville, N.C.

Western N.C. College (plus other comunity/tech colleges) in Asheville; four seasons (Fla folks come to Asheville in the summer); great medical facilities and doctors; golfing communities (if you are into that); great variety of restaurants; plus "low" cost of living. See also "Retirement Living" mag for other ideas.
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have you heard of beautiful brevard, nc? it is located in the edge of blue ridge mountains.it is always rated in the top for places to retire. about 7000 population,borders pisgah national forrest, famous brevard music center, home of brevard college, hospital four seasons, thriving retirement community. most people who visit here fall in love with the place. hope this helps
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Weaverville sounds heavenly. I was surprised that NC didn't come out better in a ranking of total state and local tax burden, but you're still way ahead of my home state of CT:

NEW HAMPSHIRE
79% of national average.

TENNESSEE
79% of national average.

ALABAMA
83% of national average.

VIRGINIA
87% of national average.

COLORADO
89% of national average.

MISSOURI
89% of national average.

TEXAS
90% of national average.

LOUISIANA
91% of national average.

FLORIDA
92% of national average.

INDIANA
92% of national average.

SOUTH DAKOTA
92% of national average.

SOUTH CAROLINA
93% of national average.

OREGON
94% of national average.

PENNSYLVANIA
95% of national average.

OKLAHOMA
95% of national average.

ARKANSAS
96% of national average.

ILLINOIS
96% of national average.

NORTH CAROLINA
96% of national average.

MICHIGAN
97% of national average.

DELAWARE
98% of national average.

GEORGIA
98% of national average.

MASSACHUSETTS
99% of national average.

MONTANA
99% of national average.

OHIO
99% of national average.

NEVADA
100% of national average.

CALIFORNIA
101% of national average.

IDAHO
101% of national average.

KANSAS
101% of national average.

MISSISSIPPI
101% of national average.

WEST VIRGINIA
101% of national average.

ARIZONA
103% of national average.

KENTUCKY
103% of national average.

NEW JERSEY
103% of national average.

RHODE ISLAND
103% of national average.

WYOMING
103% of national average.

CONNECTICUT
105% of national average.

UTAH
105% of national average.

IOWA
106% of national average.

WASHINGTON
106% of national average.

NEBRASKA
107% of national average.

VERMONT
108% of national average.

NORTH DAKOTA
108% of national average.

NEW MEXICO
112% of national average.

HAWAII
115% of national average.

MAINE
115% of national average.

MINNESOTA
117% of national average.

WISCONSIN
118% of national average.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
123% of national average.

NEW YORK
127% of national average.

ALASKA
140% of national average.
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Where is Maryland?
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NEVADA
100% of national average.

CALIFORNIA
101% of national average.



Those rankings of total state and local tax burdens seems out of whack to me. I am moving from California, where I pay a marginal income tax rate to the state of 9.3%, to Nevada, where there is no state income tax. Property taxes are a little lower in Nevada, sales taxes are considerably lower in Nevada, while automobile registration is much lower in Nevada. California's greedy tax authorities treat the capital gains distributed by mutual funds as ordinary income. How Nevada can show as about the same as California in total tax burden beats me.

Chips, preparing never, never to file state income tax returns again
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In reply to Bruce who is looking for 4 seasons, a college town in a small community..try Maine...maybe Brunswick where Bowdoin College reigns. We are transplanted Mainers (called Maniacs because we are crazy for the state) and wish we had moved here years ago. The taxes are not low, but the quality of living more than makes up for it. We have deer bedding down at night in our yard but are 20 minutes from the Mall.
And the sun seems to shine more here. We are retired and living in paradise.
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DoktorDi posted a list of tax information. Unless I miss my guess this list is not just the taxes citizens pay.

You will note Alaska is at the high end of the list and I suspect that is because of the oil depletion taxes for North Shore wells. This looks to me like the total taxes which includes such things as sales tax, gasoline tax, etc. paid by all plus items that at most have an indirected effect on a state's residents -- such as income taxes on multistate or multination corporations, estate taxes, etc.
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I'm a big fan of central Ohio. The Columbus area in particular. Ohio State's there and keeps the city young. There are many surrounding towns the size that you're looking for. The winters are mild and the summers not too hot. Housing is still reasonable. Give it a look. I lived there 20 years.
Regards, Jim
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<<Where is Maryland?>>

Whoops, my ommission. But not bad, not bad:

OREGON
94% of national average.

MARYLAND
95% of national average.

PENNSYLVANIA
95% of national average.
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<<NEVADA
100% of national average.
CALIFORNIA
101% of national average.
Those rankings of total state and local tax burdens seems out of whack to me>>

Sources are Federation of Tax Administrators (D.C.) and Center for the Study of the States (Albany) as cited on CNBC.com
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Check out Tallahassee, Fl., it's not like living in central or South Fl., most people do not consider it Fl. at all. Reguards, Capdev, (living in Orlando but leaving soon.)
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<< I was surprised that NC didn't come out better in a ranking of total state and local tax burden, but you're still way ahead of my home state of CT: >>

One thing to keep in mind when comparing taxes is that many states treat retirement income differently from other income. For example, I'm told by friends who retired there that Pennsylvania, which doesn't tax pensions and offers other breaks to retirees, is very cheap from the tax perspective.

TMF ExRO
Phil Marti
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<< We have deer bedding down at night in our yard but are 20 minutes from the Mall. >>

And when I was vacationing on Baily's Island a couple of years ago, we were buying lobsters off the dock for $3.25 a pound. Heaven!

TMF ExRO
Phil Marti
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<< <<NEVADA
100% of national average.
CALIFORNIA
101% of national average.
Those rankings of total state and local tax burdens seems out of whack to me>>

Sources are Federation of Tax Administrators (D.C.) and Center for the Study of the States (Albany) as cited on CNBC.com >>

People often overlook the fact that governments have only one way to finance themselves: taxes. SOMEONE is going to pay. I suspect the major payers in Nevada are gamblers, who provide enough gaming tax revenue that the state can have low property and sales taxes and no income tax. As someone mentioned in another post, Alaska gets significant revenue from oil removal taxes.

As I mentioned in an earlier post about PA, what's important from a tax perspective is to determine how the tax structure will affect YOU. You do that by learning their rules. Links to the state taxing authorities are avialble from the IRS website, http://www.irs.gov and, I believe, from the FTA website: http://www.fta.org.

TMF ExRO
Phil Marti
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Try

http://www.census.gov/

They have lots of data and this might help you identify towns.
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Thanks for all the feedback. North Carolina always seems to get alot of recommends.

I have narrowed it down (if you can call it narrow) to one of the following:

1) ME, NH, VT, NY (upstate)
2) VA, NC, SC (western of each)
3) Eastern rockies

On the subject of taxes, if you have not heard of the "fair tax", you should check it out at "www.fairtax.org".

Regards,
Bruce
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Hello Bruce!
<I have narrowed it down (if you can call it narrow) to one of the following: 1) ME, NH, VT, NY (upstate)>
I am glad you included upstate NY in your list! That's where I finally ended up. Housing costs are such here that I could afford to buy a house and pay the mortgage, taxes and insurance with my V.A. disability award. This is a truly gorgeous area and has four seasons. It isn't necessarily a great area for young go-getters, as opportunities seem limited; but that doesn't concern me much! I know that my sons will be off to higher learning and/or the military once they finish high school in a few years. In the meanwhile they are enjoying the change to a bucolic life-style.
Perhaps you will be one of my neighbors in the foreseeable future.

Regards,

Grumpy
SSG, USA (Ret.)
http://www.geocities.com/highwaypoet
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bcairns wrote: My screen would be something like:

1) Population between 5 and 15 thousand
2) College town a plus
3) Median home price less than $150,000
4) Four seasons

Also, if anyone can suggest a place, that would be great. I am looking for smallish town but not too rural with nice nature (no deserts, I like trees).

You might try the Places Rated Almanac, or the Retierment Places Rated. These give a good snapshot of a lot of places.

Regards
PVFOOL
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