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Author: oildude4 Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 75776  
Subject: which vanguard fund Date: 3/17/1998 10:20 PM
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I am looking for suggestions on which fund from the vanguard family would be best to have my autopayroll deduction applied to. some choices are vanguard index trust or vanguard u.s. growth portfolio. I am 36 yrs old and can afford some risk.
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Author: tc001 Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2238 of 75776
Subject: Re: which vanguard fund Date: 3/17/1998 11:15 PM
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<I am looking for suggestions on which fund from the vanguard family would be best to have my autopayroll deduction applied to. some choices are vanguard index trust or vanguard u.s. growth portfolio. I am 36 yrs old and can afford some risk.>

I prefer the Index 500. It outperforms (as most index funds do) most actively managed funds from Vanguard or any other fund family. Plus, it has an incredibly low (0.20%) expense ratio. U.S. Growth has too much volatility for my taste without giving back an increase in performance.

For more aggressive funds, I like Primecap and Health Care. Health Care is a sector fund (obviously investing in the health care industry) and sector funds are about as aggresive as you can get. The long-term potential looks very good, although this is not where I would leave more than 10-15% of my portfolio. Primecap goes after quality growth stocks. Another good performer with slightly less risk than Primecap is the Growth and Income fund (formerly called Quantitative Portfolio). It, like Primecap, has outperformed the Index 500 over the last ten years (although only slightly). Windsor II might also be considered. It's a good large cap value fund.

I mention all of these because I don't know how many choices you have to pick from so some of these funds might not even be available to you. On the other side of the coin, I was never impressed by Vanguard's international funds or their small cap funds (like Explorer). These never seem to be Vanguard's strong areas. But they do so well with large caps and bonds, who can really complain?


if you can select from *any* Vanguard fund, but I figure some of these might be



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Author: Tiggertoo One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2244 of 75776
Subject: Re: which vanguard fund Date: 3/18/1998 10:40 AM
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>>>I am looking for suggestions on which fund from the vanguard family would be best to have my autopayroll deduction applied to. some choices are vanguard index trust or vanguard u.s. growth portfolio. I am 36 yrs old and can afford some risk.<<<


I just received my annual report on the Vanguard Index Trust.

The reasl difference between the S & P 500 and growth is that the Growth concentrates in the larger companies in the S & P 500, and may have one company heavily covered compared to the S & P 500.

As of 12-31-97 The Growth Fund had 147 Stocks concentrated in consumer staples, health care, and technology. Top ten holdings make up 33.6 % of total value of portfolio.

Growth had total returns of 1 year 36.3%, 5 years 19.39%, and S&P 500 had 1 year 33.16%, 5 years 20.08%

Both look like good prospects. LOL in your choices

TTFN...TiggerToo

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Author: tc001 Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2252 of 75776
Subject: Re: which vanguard fund Date: 3/18/1998 11:23 PM
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Whoaa, TiggerToo. You might have the wrong info. You wrote:

<<I just received my annual report on the Vanguard Index Trust.

The real difference between the S & P 500 and growth is that the Growth concentrates in the larger companies in the S & P 500, and may have one company heavily covered compared to the S & P 500.>>

I think your talking about the Growth Index Portfolio but the original question made specific reference to the U.S. Growth Portfolio, a slightly different critter.

Yes, damn those Vanguard people for muddying the waters with confounded nomenclature!

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Author: Tiggertoo One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2271 of 75776
Subject: Re: which vanguard fund Date: 3/19/1998 9:59 PM
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>>>Yes, damn those Vanguard people for muddying the waters with confounded
nomenclature!<<<

BANG..You got me!!

Now I will have to go to Morningstar and find out the real difference.

Thanks.

TTFN...TiggerToo

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Author: Lepoard Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2284 of 75776
Subject: Re: which vanguard fund Date: 3/20/1998 9:07 PM
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At age 36 you may want to go with the Growth Portfolio which is a 80% Stocks, 20% Bonds. You should request a prospectus on the Lifestrategy Portfolios and decide what is best for your situation.

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Author: rds Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2324 of 75776
Subject: Re: which vanguard fund Date: 3/22/1998 11:00 PM
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re Vanguard Index Growth: not exactly. Index Growth focuses on S&P500 stocks with higher price-to-book ratios, presumably those with better growth potential. But history appears to show us that value stocks fare better longer-term, so why give up the "value" component of your index fund?

/rds/

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