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Author: sheilaoliver Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 40821  
Subject: whole grain bread Date: 1/1/2001 12:01 PM
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My health conscious freind says that the whole grain breads one sees in the groceries dont count, that once flour is made, it is a processed product. So...if I wanted to experiment with my bread machine, how would I put whole grains into the mix? What kind? How much? Where do i get? Tell all, please. thank you!

Happy New Year.
Sheila
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Author: catharine Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 7146 of 40821
Subject: Re: whole grain bread Date: 1/1/2001 12:44 PM
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"My health conscious freind says that the whole grain breads one sees in the groceries dont count, that once flour is made, it is a processed product."

Shelia, I can't answer your questions about baking your own bread, but I can tell you something about store bought bread. The key is in reading the label. Any "whole grain bread" that lists "enriched whole wheat flour" as an ingredient is processed and is nutritionally lacking. A true whole grain bread will say "whole wheat flour". It is very hard to find real whole grain bread on the shelves as most brands use "enriched whole wheat." But there are usually one or two brands that are the real thing. You have to look real hard.

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Author: VeeEnn Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 7147 of 40821
Subject: Re: whole grain bread Date: 1/1/2001 7:00 PM
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<<My health conscious freind says that the whole grain breads one sees in the groceries dont count, that once flour is made, it is a processed product. So...if I wanted to experiment with my bread machine, how would I put whole grains into the mix? What kind? How much? Where do i get? Tell all, please. thank you!>>

Well...I guess ALL bread constitutes a processed food if you consider that it has to be ground, mixed and cooked. You could try a few variations on a regular recipe with whatever you fancy but adding whole grains will give you a bread with the capacity to break your teeth because regular cooking won't soften them. I sometimes bake my own bread and whenever I've tried to improve on a recipe, it's always been a disappointment.

Dh received a book of medical quotations as a Christmas gift from one of his patients. Laurence Sterne (who was an 18th century Anglican clergyman and humorist) reckons that ... "People who are always taking care of their health are like misers, who are hoarding up a treasure which they have never spirit enough to enjoy" This sounds like it applies to your health conscious friend.....if you consider the whole grain product that a local store sells to be nicer to eat than anything else, I'd say to copy it without wondering wondering how to improve on its "goodness"


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Author: LynnHerron Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 7152 of 40821
Subject: Re: whole grain bread Date: 1/2/2001 5:22 PM
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<Well...I guess ALL bread constitutes a processed food if you consider that it has to be ground, mixed and cooked. You could try a few variations on a regular recipe with whatever you fancy but adding whole grains will give you a bread with the capacity to break your teeth because regular cooking won't soften them. I sometimes bake my own bread and whenever I've tried to improve on a recipe, it's always been a disappointment.>

I'd agree there's a problem, particularly as you get older with foods which contain unexpected hardness amid softness. I was eating in a Chinese Restaurant with a friend recently and she declined dessert on the grounds that she feared for her teeth eating toffee banana or toffee apple (very soft centre, harder shell plus even harder sesame seeds on the outside). The same person will happily eat hard foods or soft foods or inbetween foods, she just likes them to be one or the other and not mixed. I suspect that if someone wants to eat whole grains for health reasons it might be better to cook the whole grains and eat according to degree of cooking as a whole grain 'porridge' or as a substitute for rice.

Dishes such as the Russian (?) kasha (should be buckwheat but can be done with barley) or the US 'invention' Kashi which contains oats, rye, long grain brown rice, winter wheat, triticale, barley and sesame seed. I occasionally eat the latter which can be cooked harder or softer to taste but which is still whole grain. Lynn


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Author: VeeEnn Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 7155 of 40821
Subject: Re: whole grain bread Date: 1/2/2001 6:58 PM
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<<I was eating in a Chinese Restaurant with a friend recently and she declined dessert on the grounds that she feared for her teeth eating toffee banana or toffee apple (very soft centre, harder shell plus even harder sesame seeds on the outside). The same person will happily eat hard foods or soft foods or inbetween foods, she just likes them to be one or the other and not mixed>>

There's sometmes a very timely reason why I post as I do. I've opened my office on an emergency basis twice this holiday...for the same patient. On both occasions she'd broken a tooth on something hard...resulting in agonising toothache. I don't have too many really vulnerable teeth but I'm very careful how I eat these mixed combinations.

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Author: TMFKeeler Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 7159 of 40821
Subject: Re: whole grain bread Date: 1/4/2001 9:10 AM
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>>>
My health conscious freind says that the whole grain breads one sees in the groceries dont count, that once flour is made, it is a processed
product. So...if I wanted to experiment with my bread machine, how would I put whole grains into the mix? What kind? How much? Where
do i get?

<<<

It is hard to find whole grain bread in the store, true. You should read the label and make sure "whole wheat" is the first ingredient. "Wheat flour" is a misleading label for plain old white flour.

You can make your own. Most health food stores will have whole wheat flour for machines. You can probably use whole wheat flour not specifically indicated for machines also. If you have a favorite bread recipe, I would start substituiting whole wheat flour for bread flour 25% then 50% or more and see how much whole wheat you will like.

You can also try other whole grain flours you find in the health store. Another option that would make the bread healthier would be to find recipes that add in things like flax seeds or sesame seeds.

Happy Holidays :)

Patrick

http://www.fool.com/Specials/holidays/2000/holidaycard.htm

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