No. of Recommendations: 11
I had one of those moments last night that I used to read about on That Other Board in days of yore. A Why Aren't You Working moment. Lots of people will react quite negatively if you tell them you're retired at 42, and that you spend most days essentially goofing off.

I used to work in the game industry, and I was playing online with Aaron, who is still in the game industry. When we ended the session, we chatted for a bit over our headsets, and it came out that I'm retired. Which led to some moments of awkwardness.

You have to understand, the game industry is quite different from most jobs. The good people are all in it because they really love games, and they love making games. When I interviewed programming candidates, I'd always ask what games they were playing. I didn't want anyone who didn't care about games, because programmers have to make a lot of on-the-spot decisions about gameplay and user interface. Caring meant they'd spend some effort thinking about the player, and what would work best for them. Not caring meant they'd make the laziest decision and do something that damaged the game, sometimes significantly. I have quite a few bad programmer stories like that.

I was very motivated when I was working, and I had a low opinion of the guys who saw it as just a job. So admitting that I wasn't working on a project of my own was pretty awkward. I always figured that when I reached financial independence, I'd go off and do my own games. Yet when the time came, I found I'd rather play games, write the occasional review or analysis, or read books.

The truth is, even outside the miserable working conditions of most game companies, making games is hard work. It's easy enough to get an idea, but there's a lot of sweat in hammering out the fine details and then implementing them. I found that when my time was my own, my tolerance for that sort of thing dropped dramatically. Oh, sure, I'll take on a project that involves a lot of detail work now and then, but they last a day or two, not months or years.

5 years ago, people saw me as a workaholic because I put in more hours than anyone else trying to get Heroes 4 out the door, and admired me for it. Now I've discovered my inner slacker, and I kind of feel guilty about it.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Gus said:

I was very motivated when I was working...Not caring [would've] meant [making] the laziest decision and do[ing] something that damaged the game, sometimes significantly.

&

...when I reached financial independence...I found I'd rather play games, write the occasional review or analysis, or read books.


And concludes:

Now I've discovered my inner slacker, and I kind of feel guilty about it.


You're the kind of person who believes that something worth doing is worth doing right. Seems to me you've brought the same determination to "non-work" as you did to programming. You're not slacking, you're over-achieving at retirement!


alto


PS Reading your feelings on game programming provides some interesting background to your Civilization review posts, which I found extremely useful.





Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
5 years ago, people saw me as a workaholic because I put in more hours than anyone else trying to get Heroes 4 out the door, and admired me for it. Now I've discovered my inner slacker, and I kind of feel guilty about it.

The word "retired" seems to have a particular kind of emotional freight attached to it. Even DW, who is as eager to drop the wage-slave lifestyle as I am, refuses to use the word "retired" to described herself when that day arrives.

For some, I think "retired" is synonomous with "used up", "useless", "irrelevant", etc. DW says she will use the term "financially independent" instead.

--FY
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
The truth is, even outside the miserable working conditions of most game companies, making games is hard work. It's easy enough to get an idea, but there's a lot of sweat in hammering out the fine details and then implementing them. I found that when my time was my own, my tolerance for that sort of thing dropped dramatically. Oh, sure, I'll take on a project that involves a lot of detail work now and then, but they last a day or two, not months or years.

5 years ago, people saw me as a workaholic because I put in more hours than anyone else trying to get Heroes 4 out the door, and admired me for it. Now I've discovered my inner slacker, and I kind of feel guilty about it.




LOL!
Since I've retired, I often wonder how anyone finds time to work.
I can't imagine how I ever did.

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 7
The word "retired" seems to have a particular kind of emotional freight attached to it. Even DW, who is as eager to drop the wage-slave lifestyle as I am, refuses to use the word "retired" to described herself when that day arrives.

For some, I think "retired" is synonomous with "used up", "useless", "irrelevant", etc. DW says she will use the term "financially independent" instead.


I'm very close to retirement -- not early in comparison to others, but earlier than I ever expected. I had to give 3 months' notice to my employer, so that's left me sitting around in some kind of never-never-land waiting for the other shoe to drop.

I have many, many things I want to do -- No shortage of fun and mundane things. Literally, I'm getting my real life back. But I've had what I call anxiety attacks over whether I'm going to spend years sitting around in my nightgown.

I've gone over the numbers dozens of times and I can do it. But I have moments of terror that I'm going to be picking up cans from sidewalk trashcans for the 5 cent deposit.

We're not raised to "do nothing" and we're not raised to "take money for doing nothing." If last year I had taken a pile of money (4% or less) from my stash, I'd have been wracked with guilt. But I'm supposed to do it this year and next year and feel OK about it.

I'm surrounded by people (particularly women) who are retired and loving it -- most say they don't know how they found time to work. I'm told that the biggest danger here (NYC) is being overwhelmed, and paralyzed, by options and since I had that problem when I first moved here so I recognize the possibility.

What I have is the retirement version of stage fright. From a rational POV everything's great. But there's still this nagging little voice that's too loud to be totally ignored.

Whew! That's the first time I've said all of this in one go. Nobody wants to hear it since they just want to tell me how lucky I am (which is true) and how much they envy me.

I'm so very glad this board got started just when I need it most.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Now I've discovered my inner slacker, and I kind of feel guilty about it.



Drop that guilt!

ChiliSpouse retired in July at 51. Not a week goes by that he doesn't say: "I was MEANT to do nothing," or "You know what I have to do tomorrow? NOTHING!"

Everyone's story is different, but in CS's case, he embraces Slackerdom and celebrates it.

Gayle
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Drop that guilt!

ChiliSpouse retired in July at 51. Not a week goes by that he doesn't say: "I was MEANT to do nothing," or "You know what I have to do tomorrow? NOTHING!"

Everyone's story is different, but in CS's case, he embraces Slackerdom and celebrates it.

Gayle




Heh.
AngelSpouse can't wait to sit on his behind and read science fiction and putter all day.

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Not a week goes by that he doesn't say: "I was MEANT to do nothing,"

Most mornings my wife asks me "What's your agenda for today," and is disappointed when I answer "nothing."

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
Not a week goes by that he doesn't say: "I was MEANT to do nothing,"
-------------------
Most mornings my wife asks me "What's your agenda for today," and is disappointed when I answer "nothing."- Gus


Maybe this falls under the heading of "synchronicity" of some kind. When I was very young. Like 5,6, 7 yr old young. One of my favorite people to see on TV was Dean Martin. Why..? Just felt a connection of some kind for no reason. He wasn't exactly Capt Kangaroo or Clutch Cargo.

Moving ahead several decades... his second wife describing him in an interview says: Nobody does "nothing" as well as Dean. I thought to myself: HEY! Me too!

Nick Tosches in his biography said Dean "never had much interest in this world". He used the Italian word "menefreghista" to describe him. Menefreghista means: "one who simply did not give a f***." I thought: HEY! Me too!(mostly)

I spent twenty years in the application of RADAR and the most important thing I learned was how to analyze the radar pattern in order to avoid it. Fly under the radar.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
You're not slacking, you're over-achieving at retirement!

A nice turn of phrase.
Vickifool
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
We're not raised to "do nothing" and we're not raised to "take money for doing nothing." If last year I had taken a pile of money (4% or less) from my stash, I'd have been wracked with guilt. But I'm supposed to do it this year and next year and feel OK about it.

It will get easier with practice.

Also, that's not "taking money for doing nothing." You aren't taking it FROM anybody. It's just spending money you've earned and saved.

NYC--I'm a tiny bit jealous. I guess it's time for me to go visit my 86-year-old not-quite aunt there.

Vickifool
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Not caring meant they'd make the laziest decision and do something that damaged the game, sometimes significantly. I have quite a few bad programmer stories like that.


I would like to hear those stories.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
PS Reading your feelings on game programming provides some interesting background to your Civilization review posts, which I found extremely useful --alto

PPS I liked that too and follow his detailed and interesting reviews faithfully on the gaming board. Also I prefer playing on the pc with the mouse & keyboard instead of a console and joystick and he often reviews games for those of us who do that and I think at one time said he prefers that too, although I could have dreamed that I suppose.

There are so many things I have time and freedom to do now that I am retired, and playing games is one of them. I love calling my time my own and would be irritable round the clock if I had to go to a job again although I enjoyed working for many years. That was then, this is now.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Drop that guilt!
<snip>
he embraces Slackerdom and celebrates it.

Gayle

One way to overcome any compulsion is to do the opposite of the compulsion over and over until you get over it. Just like a new role, it takes practice.

Just do it, as the saying used to go.

cliff
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I would like to hear those stories.

Well, there's Programmer K. Programmer K was tasked with writing code that would record information about certain objects on the game map. Programmer K used a size-50 fixed array to record that information, and didn't bother to tell anyone he'd done that, or to ask if there was an upper limit on how many would exist. Later we got random, inexplicable behavior on some game maps which happened to have 60-70 of those objects.

Programmer K was pretty well known for being there only to collect his paycheck.

Programmer D was supposed to write a dialog, where the player would choose between gold and experience. Except that sometimes you didn't have a hero present, so gold was your only valid choice. The correct choice would be to write two dialogs, the regular one, and a simpler notice for the times you didn't have a choice. Instead, programmer D put up the choice dialog, even though there was only one valid choice, and if you chose experience, you got nothing.

I once asked programmer D to re-write a dialog that showed the benefits your heroes were receiving. The existing dialog, which he had written, wasn't very clear to our playtesters. I wanted face icons with labels above each one, showing what each one was getting, which could vary for each hero. I outlined how to do it. His response was "Why bother?"

Programmer S was supposed to write a modify a dialog I had written where you could move troops from one army to another. It was supposed to handle the case where one army was on a ship, and one was on shore. The idea was that the troops that moved would lose all movement for the turn for loading / unloading, but the troops that didn't could move on afterward. I also wanted undo, so if you moved stuff back, the dialog would restore the movement points.

Programmer S elected to eliminate all movement for all troops in both armies. Because it was trivial to implement, whereas a proper job would have taken a couple of hours. I know, because I ended up writing it.

The game had two basic playing modes, a strategic map and a tactical map for battles. I wanted to be able to save the game during a battle, since battles could take significant time. Again, I asked programmer S to do it. Programmer S flat out refused, saying it was too hard, and we shouldn't have the feature. It took me about a day's time to write.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
{{The game had two basic playing modes, a strategic map and a tactical map for battles. I wanted to be able to save the game during a battle, since battles could take significant time. Again, I asked programmer S to do it. Programmer S flat out refused, saying it was too hard, and we shouldn't have the feature. It took me about a day's time to write.}}

This is one thing that would have improved the Total War series. Some battles could take hours when the armies fighting each other were large enough.
Overall, how much of game design is based on what is easier for the programmer?


c
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I think at one time said he prefers that too, although I could have dreamed that I suppose.

No, that's definitely correct. I much prefer PC games to console games, but sometimes I write several console game reviews in a row because I haven't seen any decent PC games for a while.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I think at one time said he prefers that too, although I could have dreamed that I suppose.

No, that's definitely correct. I much prefer PC games to console games, but sometimes I write several console game reviews in a row because I haven't seen any decent PC games for a while.

- Gus




I love adventure games where you explore "strange worlds" and have to solve different kinds of puzzles -- and where no one shoots at you or jumps out and scares the bejesus out of you. But there doesn't seem to be a whole lot of them.

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
But there doesn't seem to be a whole lot of them.

I could have sworn we talked about this once before. But in any case, adventure games still exist, but they're pretty rare. The last one I recall seeing was Syberia.

Adventure games are very labor intensive to create. Each puzzle and location requires a lot of creative effort to write, and work to implement. By contrast, once you have the basic software written, in combat games it doesn't take very long to design and implement situations that will take up a lot of the player's time. Just create a room and plop down a bunch of monsters.

Adventure games are also less interactive than most other game genres. You pretty much follow a fixed series of actions that the writer expected you to take. Adventure games rarely allow you to do something unexpected, and usually don't handle it very well if you do. In the classic examples of early text games like Zork, sometimes half the puzzle was finding out which word you were supposed to use. If you're fixing an inflatable raft, do you "Fix raft?" "Glue raft?" "Attach glue to raft?" "Use glue on raft?"

By contrast, in a game about running a railroad, you may have tens or hundreds or even thousands of different ways to play the same map. You're the one making decisions as to which cities to connect, and what cargoes to ship. That sort of thing tends to improve a game's "fun" quotient. More people enjoy those games, and many players who enjoyed adventure games liked the games with more interactivity even more. Particularly popular types of games attract more game developers, because that's where the money is.

I do, personally, miss games like Monkey Island. But I understand why the genre is in eclipse.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
This is one thing that would have improved the Total War series. Some battles could take hours when the armies fighting each other were large enough.

I'm with you there. I'm playing Rome Total War right now. It would be nice to be able to stop playing when I feel like it.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

I could have sworn we talked about this once before. But in any case, adventure games still exist, but they're pretty rare. The last one I recall seeing was Syberia.

Adventure games are very labor intensive to create. Each puzzle and location requires a lot of creative effort to write, and work to implement. By contrast, once you have the basic software written, in combat games it doesn't take very long to design and implement situations that will take up a lot of the player's time. Just create a room and plop down a bunch of monsters.

Adventure games are also less interactive than most other game genres. You pretty much follow a fixed series of actions that the writer expected you to take. Adventure games rarely allow you to do something unexpected, and usually don't handle it very well if you do. In the classic examples of early text games like Zork, sometimes half the puzzle was finding out which word you were supposed to use. If you're fixing an inflatable raft, do you "Fix raft?" "Glue raft?" "Attach glue to raft?" "Use glue on raft?"

By contrast, in a game about running a railroad, you may have tens or hundreds or even thousands of different ways to play the same map. You're the one making decisions as to which cities to connect, and what cargoes to ship. That sort of thing tends to improve a game's "fun" quotient. More people enjoy those games, and many players who enjoyed adventure games liked the games with more interactivity even more. Particularly popular types of games attract more game developers, because that's where the money is.

I do, personally, miss games like Monkey Island. But I understand why the genre is in eclipse.

- Gus




Well, all I can say is "damn, damn, DAMN!"
I hate games where people shoot at me.
I REALLY hate games where monsters jump out at me.
I like puzzle solving.
I'd be willing to pay more for a good adventure game.
Surely I'm not the only person in the country who feels that way.

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
{{I'm with you there. I'm playing Rome Total War right now. It would be nice to be able to stop playing when I feel like it. }}

Did you ever play MDTW1? Battles against the Golden Horde could last a long time, plus there could be multiple battles per turn.

I am no programmer, I wonder if Gus could give a brief description of why it is so hard to make a save point in the middle of a battle.

c
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I hate games where people shoot at me.
I REALLY hate games where monsters jump out at me.


There are genres other than adventure games which don't involve fighting. Building games, like the Sim City series, or Railroad Tycoon, or the recent Sid Meier's Railroads. They tend to be financial. There's also the Sims 2, which I've always found fun, despite it not really being a "gamer's" game.

I'd be willing to pay more for a good adventure game.
Surely I'm not the only person in the country who feels that way.


No, but you need a couple of hundred thousand customers, minimum, to interest a commercial developer. I suspect that there may be some out right now by smaller, independent companies with lower production standards, but I can't name any off the top of my head.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Now I've discovered my inner slacker, and I kind of feel guilty about it.

I don't.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I hate games where people shoot at me.
I REALLY hate games where monsters jump out at me.


My kid is playing an ongoing game called "Pharoah". She loves it. She's only 9 though so she's having a lot of trouble getting out of one of the earlier dynasties. It's an older game. You ought to check Ebay and see if you can get a used copy of it.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I used to work in the game industry, and I was playing online with Aaron, who is still in the game industry. When we ended the session, we chatted for a bit over our headsets, and it came out that I'm retired. Which led to some moments of awkwardness.

Gus -

Glad I found your little enclave - I must admit, the pure volume of posts here is a bit overwhelming! :)

Just wanted to clarify a bit on my side of the conversation. The only moment of awkardness came when I was making the "just a second" sign for my wife, and I interrupted you that one time. I was surprised and jealous when you said you were retired, but sorry if that came across as awkardness. I'm definitely interested to keep the conversation going, and if I paused when I learned of your situation, it was mostly because about a million questions came to mind - wow - how? - how long? - why can't I? - lucky dog! - etc.

To get back on track (if I haven't lost all your readers) - Couldn't agree more on the game industry comments. It's almost always a labor of love. For many, that translates into "SCREW THE REST OF MY LIFE - I'M WORKING LIKE CRAAAAZY!". I got pretty burnt on that after I saw on the Tony Hawk projects that a well-run team of mature developers who actually a) show up on time, b) work for 8-10 hours, and c) go home can ship a hugely successful product with minimal to no overtime, very few if any weekends. So I decided at that point to be the guy who does a, b, and c at all my future jobs, others' opinions of me be damned.

I'm sure by the time I post this, there will be 5 new replies. ;)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

My kid is playing an ongoing game called "Pharoah". She loves it. She's only 9 though so she's having a lot of trouble getting out of one of the earlier dynasties. It's an older game. You ought to check Ebay and see if you can get a used copy of it.




Ummmm....ebay... that's an idea. Thanks.


AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Ever since Kingdom Of Kroz glitched out on me on the last level, I gave up on computer games.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I hate games where people shoot at me.
I REALLY hate games where monsters jump out at me.
I like puzzle solving.


I admit I'm a wuss when it comes to games. I don't like games with soldiers or monsters, but I've been told by my even wussier SIL that I would probably like Empire. I really enjoy puzzle games like Cubis, Tetris (old school enough?) and I, Spy (OK, so I play it with my kids).

Uhura
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Glad I found your little enclave - I must admit, the pure volume of posts here is a bit overwhelming!

Yeah, realizing that you're pretty new to some of the concepts involved in early retirement and financial independence, I wonder if this is really the right place to look. A fair number of posters here have been aware of things like Intercst's safe withdrawal studies for a long, long time.

This is really a better place to start: http://www.retireearlyhomepage.com/

Particularly: http://www.retireearlyhomepage.com/restud1.html

I was surprised and jealous when you said you were retired, but sorry if that came across as awkwardness.

If there was any there, it was probably projection on my part. I have a complex set of emotions about what I should be doing with my free time, versus what I find I actually enjoy doing with my free time. Even "should" is not an accurate description, since you can't really take the desire to make games out of someone like you or me. It's more a matter of balancing that against the energy costs involved.

So I decided at that point to be the guy who does a, b, and c at all my future jobs

Yeah, but that's not everything either. I mean, I was actually fairly accepting of the hideous hours on Heroes 4, even though I'd made a lot of noise after MAX 2 and Heroes 3 that the overtime was a symptom of bad planning.

Yet for quite a while Tilted Mill was pretty much a, b, and c, but I hated it anyway. I just found it intolerable working on a bad game with designers who didn't seem to speak design. I hated the codebase too, but that's a different and more complicated issue.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 6
I had one of those moments last night that I used to read about on That Other Board in days of yore. A Why Aren't You Working moment.

There were two issues for me: The first, obviously, was being able to afford to retire. The second, and more difficult to explain, is that I am both 1) and underachiever and 2) compulsive in some behaviors. Those would seem to be at cross purposes, and they probably are, but when I was doing computer programming, I couldn't put it down. I was the archtypical 24-hr bag-of-chips-and-a-Yoohoo type, from the 60's when it was Fortran to the 70's when I started monkeying with Basic.

I did some short-story writing in the 90's, and it was the same, I'd be up at 3AM "just putting the finishing touches" on a story, which I had put the finishing touches on four times before, at midnight, 9PM, 6PM, and so on. And sometimes (read: often) I'd be at the keyboard for 36 hours straight, bag-of-chips-and-a-YooHoo. (Coca-Cola, actually.)

I was like that in corporate America, too. I'd call the producers at the station at 2AM when I heard something I didn't like, even though it was 2AM and who the hell really cared? Then, like many, I had a bad experience with a new boss which french-fried the passion and drive, and I left.

But whatever I get into, I end up obsessing; my metal sculptures took several months out of my life - as usual at all hours of the day and night.

Retirement seems to fit me. I have a "book" which I have thought about writing for the past several years, but I fear to start it because I know I'll fall down the rabbithole, so I spend time playing with the cats, cooking the occasional dinner, and posting on the Fool boards (which I do a lot, but because they come in short bites I can take and leave - unlike "programming" or "real writing" or whatever.

I would like to write the book. I just don't want to spend the next 18 months cursing myself for giving up all the great free time I have for doing nothing, or those stupid projects around the house that I've been meaning to get to for the past 10 years.

Someday, maybe, dunno. Like I said, I'm an underachiever; been told so by every teacher I ever had, plus my parents, plus Mrs. Goofy, and others. Never bothered me much, or I'd'a worked harder, probably, but there it is.

Retirement. It's made for guys like me.
 
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
The second, and more difficult to explain, is that I am both 1) and underachiever and 2) compulsive in some behaviors.

Hmmm, put that way, perhaps I fit the same description. I had a tough time in college, not because it was hard, but because I had difficulty caring. This was fine for things like 2nd year Calculus, where I could blow off class for 2 weeks, look over the book the night before an exam and get an A. It was not so good for other classes.

Yet if I was interested, I'd put an awful lot of energy into something. Fencing, programming, making games, etc. Post-retirement, I spent many hours photographing Andromeda, M57, and M27 through an 8" telescope. Typically about 6-8 hours a night to get one composite image, maybe two.

But, you know, that kind of thing is a lot of work. And doing the other stuff like playing games or reading is fun, and a lot less effort.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I had a tough time in college, not because it was hard, but because I had difficulty caring.

Sums up my experience in grad school.


alto
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
So y'all are saying retirement is an ADD thing?

Sweet.

t.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
an introspective GoofyHoofy said:

..whatever I get into, I end up obsessing; I would like to write... I fear to start because I know I'll fall down the rabbithole..

I love your self-analysis. That's probably because of common ground. I bought a seasonal walkup ice cream store in -01 to give myself "something to do" in retirement. I try to convince myself I don't obsess, but can honest small businesspersons say that?

When I bitch to DW about employees bringing problems to work, ice cream machine service calls that start at $138 for travel + a 1/2- hour of labor, incorrect invoices, building vandalism, certain things I can't buy because the rep doesn't want DQ mad at him, she reminds me this was my retirement choice.

It gets exhilaratingly hectic. That may be oxymoronic. I know I'm where "all bucks stop," and that means unending decisions as well as pressure. As bad as it gets sometimes, I still love it. I'm "the man," succeeding or flopping, deciding what to take out of the business or leave in, etc.

don't want to spend the next 18 months cursing for giving up the free time for doing nothing...Retirement. It's made for guys like me.

I see we share something besides obsession--we both enjoy the freedom to "do nothing" after years of jumping through hoops upon others' commands. I guess it would be appropriate on this particular board to say that we both apparently have a LIBERAL lack of guilt.





Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I admit I'm a wuss when it comes to games. I don't like games with soldiers or monsters, but I've been told by my even wussier SIL that I would probably like Empire. I really enjoy puzzle games like Cubis, Tetris (old school enough?) and I, Spy (OK, so I play it with my kids).

Uhura




I loved Syberia and Syberia II.
I loved Schizm and Mysterious Journey II.
I loved Aura and Myst and Riven.
I loved an older one called Timelapse.

You might enjoy any of these.

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Retirement seems to fit me. I have a "book" which I have thought about writing for the past several years, but I fear to start it because I know I'll fall down the rabbithole, so I spend time playing with the cats, cooking the occasional dinner, and posting on the Fool boards (which I do a lot, but because they come in short bites I can take and leave - unlike "programming" or "real writing" or whatever.

I would like to write the book. I just don't want to spend the next 18 months cursing myself for giving up all the great free time I have for doing nothing, or those stupid projects around the house that I've been meaning to get to for the past 10 years.

Someday, maybe, dunno. Like I said, I'm an underachiever; been told so by every teacher I ever had, plus my parents, plus Mrs. Goofy, and others. Never bothered me much, or I'd'a worked harder, probably, but there it is.

Retirement. It's made for guys like me.



And gals like me.

I also have an idea for a book.
Well it's a good idea for a story.
Well, a good idea for part of a story. :)

I've been told that I should just write it to please myself.
But somehow, I just never get started.

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
We're not raised to "do nothing" and we're not raised to "take money for doing nothing." If last year I had taken a pile of money (4% or less) from my stash, I'd have been wracked with guilt. But I'm supposed to do it this year and next year and feel OK about it.

So true! Over the last couple of years I was very reluctant to spend very much, because retirement was coming and I didn't want to see ANY money go out the door. I had told my manager last year that if a job action happened, I didn't really care if I stayed or went.

MDH was extremely frustrated, but I knew there would be a job action with my name in it in the near future. My job action came up on Jan. 29th. I was stunned at first, but then realized - this is it! I'm free, with a very nice severance package that amounts to about a year's salary, after taxes.

Its going to take some adjustment. I'm still really fixated on preserving capital. But I have until 2008 to adjust. (I'll defer my official retirement to next year to minimize taxes for this year.)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Gus and Gamemaker,

Thanks for the wonderful insights! My son is a sophomore in college and loves to code games. He taught himself how to program while in high school. He's working on part-time projects on game mods while in college.

I'm torn between sending a link to this thread to him or his girlfriend<G>.

BTW The girlfriend was totally blown away when over for supper one night when I answered a technical question on stacks for him. (I started in computers in the mid-60s.) His GF is an Art History major<G>.

Mom
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
He taught himself how to program while in high school. He's working on part-time projects on game mods while in college.

Those are the kind of programmers we take seriously. I always had my doubts about the ones who started late as a second career, or started because they thought the pay was good. The real programmers get hooked early (I was 12) and learn a lot of programmer in their own.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
learn a lot of programmer in their own.

OCD: Programming.

D'oh.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Those are the kind of programmers we take seriously. I always had my doubts about the ones who started late as a second career, or started because they thought the pay was good. The real programmers get hooked early (I was 12) and learn a lot of programmer in their own.

- Gus




Not true.
I didn't discover programming until after I got divorced from first husband and went to the university to get a degree. It was there that I discovered computer science and programming. I was a damned good programmer, too. And I worked on software that could one day help save your life. So don't get too flip about who is good and who isn't due to when they started. :Þ ~~~~~~

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I didn't discover programming until after I got divorced from first husband and went to the university to get a degree.

I should have qualified what I said with "in recent years." Computers were still pretty new and strange when I got started, in 1977, with a kit. Owning your own computer was very rare then. My high school didn't have Apples or PCs, it had dumb terminals connected via 300 baud modems with rubber-lipped acoustic couplers to a HP 2000 or a PDP-11/34, which were in the school district building.

These days, it's pretty rare for kids not to get exposure to computers in school, if not at home.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
but I've been told by my even wussier SIL that I would probably like Empire.

Uhura
------------

Well, I certainly seem to.

Joseph living in the Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore - Empire, Mi.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
<<Those are the kind of programmers we take seriously. I always had my doubts about the ones who started late as a second career, or started because they thought the pay was good. The real programmers get hooked early (I was 12) and learn a lot of programmer in their own.>>

Not true.
I didn't discover programming until after I got divorced from first husband and went to the university to get a degree. It was there that I discovered computer science and programming. I was a damned good programmer, too. And I worked on software that could one day help save your life. So don't get too flip about who is good and who isn't due to when they started.


I am a natural born engineer and programmer, and did it for many years (20+) before being made useless (i.e. becoming a manager :-), but one of the best programmers I ever had the pleasure to work with was a music guy and music major who actually worked in music for 5+ years before switching to programming mainly because he wasn't able to earn as much as needed in the music business. Now I have engineers and programmers working for me and I find that the quality of the programmers being turned out by colleges today leaves much to be desired. I'll take a music major who is a good programmer over a "credentialed" programmer with a BSCS or BSEE that is only a mediocre programmer any day.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I'll take a music major who is a good programmer over a "credentialed" programmer with a BSCS or BSEE that is only a mediocre programmer any day.

I've never thought much of credentials, myself. A few years back I interviewed a few candidates with a Master's in computer science, and I was surprised by how little they actually knew. I didn't see it as a reflection on them, personally, so much as a reflection on the fact that they'd never worked on a real project.

The point I was trying to make is that real talent for programming and enthusiasm for programming are usually linked. Usually the best ones are the ones that seek it out on their own because it fascinates them.

- Gus
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
My first job out of college was at a game developer. I could see it was a fun industry to be in (and I love games), but I could also tell it would quickly eat me up and spit me out. Burnout city! I'm like you Gus, much better to play and enjoy games than to develop them. :)

AngelMay, I am a big fan of adventure games as well. It's my favorite genre, along with RPG's. I've lost count on how many adventure games I've collected/played over the years but it's in the hundreds. Some good sites to get you connected with other fanatics of the genre. Each one of these sites has a forum where one can post messages.

[url]http://www.adventuregamers.com/[/url]

[url]http://www.gameboomers.com/[/url]

[url]http://www.justadventure.com/[/url]

The one below is low volume of users but has very nice (and knowledgeable) people:

[url]http://fourfatchicks.com/[/url]

These two sites are good for seeing all of the different adventure titles that have been released over the years, both freeware and commercial.

[url]http://www.adventure-archiv.com[/url]

[url]http://www.a-for-adventure.com[/url]

You can find some pretty good quality freeware adventure games at this site:

[url]http://www.new.bigbluecup.com/games.php[/url]

A few more links which contain a whole lot of online based adventure games to try out:

[url]http://www.nordinho.net/vbull/forumdisplay.php?f=161[/url]

[url]http://www.lazylaces.com/default.asp[/url]

So, as you can see the adventure genre is very much alive and kicking. It's just not very mainstream any more.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Whoops, I see I screwed up the formatting of the url's. I don't see an edit button though so I can't fix it. Just remove the [/url at the end of each link and they should be good.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
So, as you can see the adventure genre is very much alive and kicking. It's just not very mainstream any more.


Thanks a bunch.
Too bad it is no longer mainstream, though.

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Ummmm....ebay... that's an idea. Thanks.


AM, have you ever played Sim City? I loved that series, it's fun and creative.

6
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
<<He taught himself how to program while in high school. He's working on part-time projects on game mods while in college.

Those are the kind of programmers we take seriously. I always had my doubts about the ones who started late as a second career, or started because they thought the pay was good. The real programmers get hooked early (I was 12) and learn a lot of programmer in their own.

- Gus >>


In 1965 I was a high school Sophomore. The high school I went to had just acquired a desk sized "personal" computer with a paper tape reader/punch and typewriter for input/output, and it was the domain of the math teacher who was also adviser to the chess club I joined.

I was among those that spent all the time available on the computer, as well as chess. Not far away was the University of Washington and it's computer center, which the teacher got access to for those of us who were interested.

The university had free classes in variou compyer languages of the day such as Fortran, Cobol and assembly languages for the main frame computers they operated. I went gung ho and spent lots of time there, not much different than other geeky kids like a pair called Bill Gates and Paul Allen who did the same thing at the same computer center a few years later.


That was before mass employment in computer programming. Had I been a few years later I might have wound up in on the ground floor of the mass use of computers.




Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Saw a nice sign at the store I bought gas at on the trip to West TX...

"Work hard - the millions on welfare nare depending upon you"

t.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

AM, have you ever played Sim City? I loved that series, it's fun and creative.

6



No, I haven't.
Thanks for mentioning it.

AM
Print the post Back To Top
Advertisement