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Author: footsox Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 129084  
Subject: Working with Corian Date: 2/25/2004 9:32 AM
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Hi everyone -
Some of you may have noticed that I recently posted a message about making my own laminate countertops. Well, I got to thinking about it, and was wondering if I could make my own corian countertops. Has anyone done this? Afterall, its just a big hunk of material that you cut and finish the edges right? I would just figure out which saw blades to use, and which buffing tool to rent. I figure the first hurdle is getting someone to sell me the blank stock of corian. Any advice on this? Thanks. (I promise not to post here about cutting my own granite, honest..)

Footsox
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Author: bankingintern Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 46647 of 129084
Subject: Re: Working with Corian Date: 2/25/2004 10:21 AM
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FYI, your not the first person to think about doing this. However, the corrian dealers will lose their liscense to sell and install the material should they sell just the material to a home DIYer. Hence buying just the corrian is going to be hard for you to do, there is a black market of smaller pieces for craft projects ect. out there by some dealers but overall laying your hands on a kitchens worth of material is VERY hard.

If you want to go solid surface why not look at stone? Granite slabs can be bought between $5-10 a sq ft if you call around and find a true wholesaler. If you do that you'll get slabs in 4-6 foot lengths with a bullnose edge on it allready.
A diamond blade to cut the material that will fit your basic circular saw will cost $100. A sink drill bit is $50. An angle grinder to fix any small mistakes/burrs is $150, or you can use a $20 diamond pad. Tool costs will total $170 - $300 and you may be able to get some cheaper via ebay or your local pawn shop.
To install it all you need are some liquid nails, tape, and epoxy, and maybe a how to book to make you comfortable as to what your doing. Yes it is a bit of work to do, however you'll get a countertop that is very hard to damage and that will add something in the eyes of many buyers when or if you sell your house.

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Author: wecoguy Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 46648 of 129084
Subject: Re: Working with Corian Date: 2/25/2004 10:37 AM
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There are other suppliers of materials similar to Corian.. Be worth looking for them on the web or locally.. Probably not a dime's worth of difference ...

Or use stone, where the weight of large slabs can get overwhelming.. But also zero grout line granite tiles is another option giving a lot of flexibility... just take your time and get it the way you want.. Tile suppliers, shops are happy to help you through it all... Very wide variety to select from..

weco

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Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 46653 of 129084
Subject: Re: Working with Corian Date: 2/25/2004 10:53 AM
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The advice you have gotten so far is excellent. Corian is the Dupont brandname, but its an imitation marble made from plastic. Lots of others suppliers make that plastic too. Others will probably sell to you.

I think Corian is too soft to use in a kitchen. It scratches easily. Its probably OK in a bathroom.

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Author: Goofyhoofy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 46655 of 129084
Subject: Re: Working with Corian Date: 2/25/2004 10:57 AM
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But also zero grout line granite tiles is another option giving a lot of flexibility

Can you help me on this? A Google on "zero grout" brings up just five entries; 2 in Swedish, one from a gear manufacturer, one from a dam construction company, and one from a British company with its annual report, but no list of dealers or availabilities.

Where did you hear about it? Do you have any links or company names?

Thanks.

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Author: rsprang Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 46657 of 129084
Subject: Re: Working with Corian Date: 2/25/2004 11:01 AM
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Well, I got to thinking about it, and was wondering if I could make my own corian countertops. Has anyone done this?

I haven't done it, but I have done other work with Corian. If you have basic woodworking skills, it's very similar to working with wood.

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Author: rsprang Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 46659 of 129084
Subject: Re: Working with Corian Date: 2/25/2004 11:06 AM
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However, the corrian dealers will lose their liscense to sell and install the material should they sell just the material to a home DIYer.

I have bought Corrian at my local dealer - the will sell it to anyone who walks in their store around here. Perhaps there is some local agreement or something in your area, or perhaps they have changed their policies since I last bought Corrian (about 2 years ago).

Just did a quick search on the web:
http://www.corian.com/a/en/h/Locators/LocateaRetailer.html

apparently they sell through retailers such as Home Depot:

You may also find Corian® solid surfaces in the U.S. at:

The Home Depot®
EXPO® Design Center
Lowes® Home Improvement Warehouse
The Great Indoors





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Author: Goofyhoofy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 46662 of 129084
Subject: Re: Working with Corian Date: 2/25/2004 11:35 AM
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I think Corian is too soft to use in a kitchen. It scratches easily. Its probably OK in a bathroom.

Our kitchen in Chicago had Corian countertops, and lots of it. We did not have a problem with "wear" of any kind. Of course we didn't use it as a cutting board, either.

We did have a problem at the corner where they dropped the stovetop into the island. They cut a perfectly square corner, which cracked and travelled. Even though we were not the original owner (installed by the previous owner) the company came back and "repaired" it. That lasted about a year, and it cracked again just before we moved. FWIW. The repair was invisible, but of course, it didn't last either.

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Author: wecoguy Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 46807 of 129084
Subject: Re: Working with Corian Date: 2/27/2004 2:19 AM
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Oops, sorry for not responding, got lost in cleaning up that mess today..

Actually all it is, is laying the tiles up tight on each other, a little tricky to keep them truly level and flat, because any deviation shows in the reflective surface.. The grout line is practically non existent. So in our case we had a very dark granite tile, and we used a black, unsanded grout. Just work it in, it really took very, very little grout. We had used 1x2 Oak to wrap the outer edges of the counter, and there was a grout line along it.. We also used tiles for the backsplash under the cabinets, behind the stove.. Where edges show, we had those tiles bull nosed.. There were three locations where we had to cut holes to allow for outlets in the backsplash.. Came out great, much easier to deal with than full lengths, looking back I could have maybe been more creative in the layout, but we do have cabinet layouts to take into account also, so we are happy in the end.. The project was a complete strip and rebuild of this kitchen/family room.. about 10 years back, now..

weco

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