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http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/causes/11-cities-with-the-wors...

Imagine turning on the tap in the morning to find an unpleasant brown sludge that tastes like metal.

I do wonder who the brave soul was that decided to find out what the brown sludge tasted like.
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The brown is actually harmless to drink. It's most likely just iron (hence the "metal" taste). Not so good for laundering "whites", though.

The dangerous chemicals are the ones you can't see.

Most tap water in the USA is just fine. The idiots in Flint screwed up, that doesn't mean all tap water is bad. For many years, tap water was actually safer than bottled water.

Just because it comes in a plastic bottle with a colorful label, it isn't necessarily safer.

BTW, much of the "bottled" water in the USA, even that showing pure flowing springs on the label, is just city tap water run through a charcoal filter (you can do this at home for a fraction of the cost).

Bottled water, to a large degree, is just about convenience and clever marketing. It's probably not safer. It's far more expensive, and creates tons of environmental problems (billions of plastic bottles, costs of transportation, etc).

I won't even mention the nasty things that may be leaching out of that plastic bottle and contaminating your "pure bottled water" (which may well be Cleveland municipal tap water run through a simple filter).
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"BTW, much of the "bottled" water in the USA, even that showing pure flowing springs on the label, is just city tap water run through a charcoal filter (you can do this at home for a fraction of the cost)." - Commodore
--------------------------------------


Which I find hilarious funny. Reminds me of the P.T. Barnum saying "a sucker is born every minute." People are such rubes! LOL!

Art
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We've started putting all our drinking water through a Berkey gravity filter system with optional flouride filter. Both my wife and I are hypothyroid. Getting the flouride (and chlorine?) out resulted in 20% reduction of thyroid meds for me.

Flouride suppresses thyroid function and used to be prescribed for hyperthyroid.

Flouride and chlorine both disrupt gut biome and that could have been a factor as well. Gut bacteria are responsible for something like up to 25% of T4 to T3.
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My dentist has a chart of the acidity of various drinks including sodas and OJ...

And two brands of bottled water with a PH of 4.

She recommends tap.

Been drinking tap 50 years still here. Y’all are suckers pulled in by propaganda paying more for something that’s worse for you than what comes out of the tap free. Add a filter but stop filling the planet with the damn plastic bottles.
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I won't even mention the nasty things that may be leaching out of that plastic bottle and contaminating your "pure bottled water" (which may well be Cleveland municipal tap water run through a simple filter).


Not to mention, the water has gone through an industrial process. Yeah, it was filtered, but what else happened to it?

A while back benzene was discovered in Perrier, but it was discovered by accident by a third party. Your local tap water is tested. Not so much with bottled water.
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<<I won't even mention the nasty things that may be leaching out of that plastic bottle and contaminating your "pure bottled water" (which may well be Cleveland municipal tap water run through a simple filter).


Not to mention, the water has gone through an industrial process. Yeah, it was filtered, but what else happened to it?>>



Typically, water for bottled water, soda pop, beer and such goes through a process of reverse osmosis that is otherwise used to turn seawater into the tap water you (correctly) think is fine.

You don't want to drink bottled water? I'm not aware anyone is forcing you to drink it.

But bottled water is often a FAR better choice than no water at all, or other beverages.

I often made plastic bottles of water available at Cub Scout Outings, because boys and adults often drank it. FAR better than many other choices.

I will infrequently pack a lunch with a bottle of water if I'm going to be away from home. Without the bottled water, I would probably still eat lunch but might well drink less water.

Again, bottled water is a FAR better option than no water or less water.

It's unfortunate that there are so many water bigots who discourage healthy practices.



Seattle Pioneer
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"I do wonder who the brave soul was that decided to find out what the brown sludge tasted like. "

*********************************************

I grew up drinking well water - had a brown rusty red tint to it from
iron content.

Not all the stories you hear about water from various sources are true.
Both the stories and the sources are at times suspect.

Howie52
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"I grew up drinking well water - had a brown rusty red tint to it from
iron content."

Had all sorts of different 'water'

Grew up in NJ suburbs with town water. Good.

Had summer place at Culver Lake......neighbor had 25 foot deep well that providing water for washing, dishes, etc, but we didn't drink it. Either brought water from home, or went to a local gas station with deep well and got water there.

Moved to Chicago....two years with city water, one year with well water......

Moved to VA....a couple years on city water, then six years on a 320 foot deep well. Somewhat acidic and iron water but drank it..... most folks had water treatment equipment .....

last 28 years been on city water.

Lot to be said for city water...but it always isn't great especially in the summer in TX when the tap water comes out 80 degrees and full of chlorine........

When I travel I drink bottled water....and sometimes refill the bottles with motel water....which can be good or bad depending where you are.

Worst water I ever had was 60 years ago at Devils River ND I think....water tasted horribly of sulfur. Mom cooked rice and it literally stank....couldn't eat it. Yuk...... Probably they got that fixed now.


t.
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We live on a high ridge, on a dirt road, in a small town, on several acres. Land has never been anything but this place. We have a deep well and water tastes and looks great.

However, several years ago, when we had a pipe problem requiring replacement. I had them install a simple water filter system with a replaceable cartridge. Periodically, I simply turn off two lever valves, empty the filter holder into a tub, replace the 0.5 micron filter, and turn on the valves again.

Bottled water usually tastes flat to us, but we sometimes use them on a trip. Otherwise, we recycle a few bottles with our own water (cleaning the bottles, too, of course) and keep cold water in the 'fridge for our use. We usually have a "water bottle" close by when we relax, since we know that older folks, especially, need to stay hydrated.

I hate the fact that so many bottles end up in the ocean.

Vermonter
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"I hate the fact that so many bottles end up in the ocean.

Vermonter "

************************************************************

There just are not enough messages anymore.

Howie52
I blame social media.

Course, the paucity of really notable shipwrecks may also be a factor
limiting the use of messages in bottles.
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But bottled water is often a FAR better choice than no water at all, or other beverages.

If you are going to go to the trouble of packing a bottle of water, you can also just pack a refillable bottle with tap water or filtered water in it. No?

That would be a good thing to teach the Cub Scouts, No?

Mike
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<<But bottled water is often a FAR better choice than no water at all, or other beverages.

If you are going to go to the trouble of packing a bottle of water, you can also just pack a refillable bottle with tap water or filtered water in it. No?

That would be a good thing to teach the Cub Scouts, No?

Mike>>



During the summer Cub Scout Day Camp, our district had about 100 boys participating in the program. Some were dropped of by parents who did not provide them with lunch or drinking water, despite often hot temperatures and a long day.

One of our first activities the first (of four) days was to hand out a plastic bottle of water and a cord with the project being to make a loop so the bottle could be carried around the neck and refilled during the course of the week as needed. Boys were repeatedly encouraged by example to stay well hydrated throughout four long, often hot days.

But during other activities (such as family picnics), especially when families retained their structure for activities, it wasn't practical to instruct families and adults in such things. It was more important to make water available in forms that families were familiar with, which was often plastic bottles of water.

Speaking as a person who has had repeated episodes of kidney stones and gout, almost certainly mainly caused by poor hydration, I would estimate that it's perhaps 10,000 times as important for human beings to stay well hydrated as it is to avoid using plastic bottles of water. (just to throw out a number)

The use of plastic bottles is trivial beside the interest of human health and welfare. The failure of liberals to realize that is one of many reasons why they need to be kept away from the levers of government power.


Seattle Pioneer
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SP explains,

Speaking as a person who has had repeated episodes of kidney stones and gout, almost certainly mainly caused by poor hydration, I would estimate that it's perhaps 10,000 times as important for human beings to stay well hydrated as it is to avoid using plastic bottles of water. (just to throw out a number)

</snip>


Nobody is questioning the benefits of hydration, just the idiocy of buying tap water in a bottle at Safeway prices when it's free at the tap.

Why buy the plastic cow when the water is free?

intercst
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<<SP explains,

Speaking as a person who has had repeated episodes of kidney stones and gout, almost certainly mainly caused by poor hydration, I would estimate that it's perhaps 10,000 times as important for human beings to stay well hydrated as it is to avoid using plastic bottles of water. (just to throw out a number)

</snip>

Nobody is questioning the benefits of hydration, just the idiocy of buying tap water in a bottle at Safeway prices when it's free at the tap.

Why buy the plastic cow when the water is free?

intercst>>


Because it provides a vital service at a trivial cost.

Water in plastic bottles costs what? Five cents or ten cents? That cost is trivial compared to the importance of encouraging hydration for families at a Cub Scout picnic on a hot summer day, I suggest.

People are certainly welcome to bring their own water bottles and such to such an event, and some do. But it is VASTLY more important to provide water that people will actually drink than to dispense doing so because of the trivial cost or impact of the plastic bottles.

That was my judgement in organizing and conducting such events, anyway.

Such events might also feature plastic cups that could be filled with water from larger jugs, and if people would use those they were welcome to do so. But some people trust the purity of bottled water over the perhaps doubtful purity of water in reusable plastic jugs.

In short, encouraging needed hydration is far more important than quibbling over plastic bottles, in my opinion and practice.

However, if I had a Cub Scout volunteer who was picky about plastic bottles, and agreed to provide the cups, jugs of water and other options which would be a useful substitute for plastic bottles, I would no doubt have been willing to let them organize the hydration issue.


But in many years of organizing Cub Scout activities, I never had someone agree to do that, or even ask about it. I therefore developed my own practices which I've outlined in these posts, with the main aim of maximizing the safety of human beings and especially boys for whom I was responsible as a program leader.

I Might add that in this I was influenced by the practices I observed at Boy Scout summer camps, which were demanding week long camps where hydration could be a real hazard over time if neglected. These were older boys age 11-17, while Cub Scouts were age 6-10. Boy Scouts had usually been schooled by the program on the importance of staying hydrated and keeping a water bottle filled and handy for frequent use. And it was always a refillable bottle.

But at meals and other occasions, it was common to have youth program leaders display chugging down a bottle of that water, in order to remind and encourage boys to do the same.

It was observing that practice by the Boy Scouts that led me to give special care to the needs of young children and families when I became a Cub Scout leader years later.

But I was also sensitive to what young boys could and would be likely to do, and my conclusion was that using bottled water was vastly more important than fixating on refillable bottles, which would be emphasized in Boy Scouts when the boys were ready to use that kind of equipment.


Seattle Pioneer
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When I was in scouts the adults, my dad included, all brought large water containers, 3-5 gallons each, that we filled our bottles from. That was part of the planning.
We didn't have disposable water bottles and we somehow survived and stayed hydrated.
I went to a large Jamboree with thousands of others and I don't think there was one disposable bottle. Somehow they provided water for us all without adding to the landfill.

Kids learn from the adults. I wonder what is now required for the conservation merit badge?

Mike
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<<When I was in scouts the adults, my dad included, all brought large water containers, 3-5 gallons each, that we filled our bottles from. That was part of the planning.
We didn't have disposable water bottles and we somehow survived and stayed hydrated.>>


There's a difference between Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, as I made clear in my post.



Seattle Pioneer
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I will infrequently pack a lunch with a bottle of water if I'm going to be away from home. Without the bottled water, I would probably still eat lunch but might well drink less water.

Again, bottled water is a FAR better option than no water or less water.

It's unfortunate that there are so many water bigots who discourage healthy practices.


Discourage healthy practices? How did you come up with that one? I was merely adding to Commodor64's point that many people drink bottled water because they believe it is better for you, but there is no real evidence that's the case, and some evidence it might be worse, due to the presence of phthalates.

If I'm out and about and need a bottle of water, sure I'll buy one. Otherwise I simply keep a pitcher of good old Seattle tap water in the refrigerator and drink as desire. If I need to go somewhere, I fill up a reusable bottle, which is certainly more convenient that stopping to buy a bottle.
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Plastic or glass water bottles can be used to purify water too:

Sunlight. Just leave a clear glass or plastic bottle out in the sun for six hours. SODIS, or solar water disinfection, is an age-old method touted by the World Health Organization for areas where access to clean water is limited. UV rays in the sunlight tear apart the microbes to make water safe.
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2012/05/16/to-disi...
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