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arrived in the mail, today. One is a #7 with a Large Block logo - It sits flat and appears to be in pretty good shape, except for some rust on the bottom side.

The other is a #10 small logo. I didn't pay much for it, thankfully - It has a pretty (very) distinct wobble (warpage). I might try removing the warpage on my GA$ at 600 or 700 degrees F with some bricks to "bend" the bottom back in place - Call it an experiment. Anyone care to lend some insight, other than "Don't do it"?

Bob
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The other is a #10 small logo. I didn't pay much for it, thankfully - It has a pretty (very) distinct wobble (warpage).

There's nothing wrong with the small logo Griswolds; they are far superior to anything being made nowadays.

Call it an experiment. Anyone care to lend some insight, other than "Don't do it"?

Yeah. Don't do it! (oops, you said not to say that...) (8^) You will most likely crack it. Or, at best, just make the warpage worse. Do you have an inner demon that likes to destroy antique iron skillets?


OleDoc
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Yeah. Don't do it! (oops, you said not to say that...) (8^) You will most likely crack it. Or, at best, just make the warpage worse.

I don't *think* I will crack it, if the bricks are placed on the skillet before it gets very hot, or if I warm the bricks in the same grill before placing on top of the skillet.

The skillet isn't really worth much in its current condition, OleDoc. It's not badly rusted and there are no pits. However, the warpage in this one is considerably worse than in the #8 that you recommended that I not address, and that I haven't.

Do you have an inner demon that likes to destroy antique iron skillets?

No. I'd like to try straightening one that someone else abused. I've brought back cars and grills in such a condition. I plan to try doing so with a vintage skillet that has been abused, probably by overheating, dry, I suspect - That's all.

Bob
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I've brought back cars and grills in such a condition. I plan to try doing so with a vintage skillet that has been abused, probably by overheating, dry, I suspect - That's all.

FYI, my dad owned a body shop and I was his slave for 6 years before going off to college. So, I know all about "restoring cars", working metal, using torches, using hydraulic leverage, sanding, priming, painting. You name it.

A skilled worker using a grinder on sheet metal can make minor repairs a snap; an unskilled one can burn a hole in the metal in no time flat!

So, you plan to correct the warpage in that skillet by heating it to extreme heat to compensate for someone abusing it by heating it to extreme heat. Correct? You've never done it before. The guy who posted that idea on a website has probably never done it before - it was probably just some wild-eyed, Walter Mitty idea he had late at night that sounded like it might work. And, he hooked a sucker!!!

Take lots of pictures, Bob, because if you don't "show me" (motto of Missouri), I ain't gonna buy any fish tales. My bet is that you will kill another antique skillet.


OleDoc
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My bet is that you will kill another antique skillet.


No, I didn't. It didn't help though, either - didn't budge it, one way or the other in the least... just wasted LPG, with additional risk assumption. You were certainly spot-on, OleDoc - The article I read on removing warpage from cast iron didn't work, at all.

The cooking surface is in pretty good shape - just some (fairly minor) surface rust: http://s229.photobucket.com/albums/ee228/NoIDAtAll/Removing%...

I don't recall the amount that we wagered, but if you pay the shipping cost and email a shipping address, I'll send the skillet. USPS Flat Rate shipping is probably the least expensive way to get it to you. If you already have a #10 Griswold, I'll clean it up, post pics and use it - could use your help with prepping and frying a tortilla and great topping, one way or the other.

Bob
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I don't recall the amount that we wagered

In that case, you bet me $50 that it was going to work! (bg)
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Thanks Gog it's April 1st!! <g>
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I'll send the skillet.

No thanks. I already have too many skillets - including 3 cast iron Griswolds. Don't need any more and don't have enough space to store any more.


OleDoc
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I'll send the skillet.

No thanks. I already have too many skillets - including 3 cast iron Griswolds. Don't need any more and don't have enough space to store any more.

OleDoc


Phew!! The only skillet I have that size is a Lodge, and I'd really rather cook on the smooth cooking surface of a Griswold or Wagner Ware skillet.

One of these days, if I can scrape up enough, or find a decent used one at a price I can afford, I'd really like to get a couple of pieces of enameled Le Creuset ironware.

Bob
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I might try this recipe for a Chicago Style pizza in the #10 Griswold skillet in my oven or grill, after I get it cleaned up and seasoned:
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Chicago-Style-Pan-Pizza/Detail....
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Red November Sauce (#2)
28 oz 11.3 NTSS (1.053 g/cc) tomato puree
14 g sucrose 3.5 t
7 g salt 1.25 t ordinary salt
3.5 g herbs & spices (see below)
3.5 g garlic powder 1.25 t
3.5 g onion powder 1.5 t

herbs & spices (dried & crushed)
earthy component
4 vu oregano 1/2 t
2 vu marjoram 1/4 t
1 vu parsley 1/8 t
sweet component
4 vu basil 1/2 t
2 vu tarragon 1/4 t
1 vu fennel seed 1/8 t
savory component
2 vu rosemary 1/4 t
2 vu thyme 1/4 t
spicy component
1 vu paprika 1/8 t
1 vu black pepper 1/8 t

Notes:
"vu" stands for volume unit since the measurements are expressed in ratios. If measured accurately and the herbs are crushed sufficiently, the total mass should be 3.5g when 1 vu = 1/8 tsp.
Instructions:
Add the sucrose (table sugar) and salt to the sauce first and whisk. In a separate sealable container measure and mix all the herbs and spices as well as the garlic and onion powders. I recommend choosing a volume unit that allows you to match your quantity of puree exactly. Trying to divide the herbs and spices after mixing will lead to uneven distribution. Seal the container and shake well. Pour the mixture into a microwaveable container such as a small Pyrex measuring cup. Add just enough filtered water to the mixture so that it is completely moist, but not suspended in water. Follow the microwave instructions in my two previous posts. Add the herbs and spices to the puree. Whisk and place in refrigerator to chill for at least 6 hours before using.
Notes:

1 watt = 0.42992261 F/g/s (i.e. degrees Fahrenheit per gram per second)
1 microwave watt = 1 watt (0.42992261) * wave scatter coefficient (0.125) = 0.0537403262 F/g/s

The first objective is to keep the power between 300 and 420 watts. So if you have a microwave oven in the power range of 1000 to 1400 watts, use 30% power. Next calculate the exact power you're using, so if you have a 1200 watt microwave, you know you are using 1200 * 0.3 = 360 watts of power. The second objective is to radiate the mixture to the point it reaches no higher than 160 F. To determine how long you microwave for, use the following equation:

(160 - [water temp]) * [water mass] / ([exact power] * 0.0537403262)

(160F - 67F) * 10g / (360W * 0.0537403262) = 48 seconds

Dough
Flour (KABF)* (100%):354.44 g | 12.5 oz | 0.78 lbs
Water** (56.5%):200.26 g | 7.06 oz | 0.44 lbs
IDY (0.14%):0.5 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.16 tsp | 0.05 tbsp
Salt (1.75%):6.2 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.11 tsp | 0.37 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (7.3%):25.87 g | 0.91 oz | 0.06 lbs | 5.7 tsp | 1.9 tbsp
Sugar (4.8%):17.01 g | 0.6 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.27 tsp | 1.42 tbsp
Total (170.49%):604.28 g | 21.31 oz | 1.33 lbs | TF = N/A


*KABF: 12.5 oz. = 2 c. + 1/2 c. + 1/4 c. + a bit over 3 1/3 t.
**Water: 7.06 oz. = 3/4 c. + 1 T. + a bit over 1 1/2 t.
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The #10 Griswold skillet cleaned up pretty easily, a lot easier than the waffle plates:

http://s229.photobucket.com/albums/ee228/NoIDAtAll/No%2010%2...
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#10 Griswold skillet cleaned up pretty easily

Which oil will you be seasoning it with?

Barry
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#10 Griswold skillet cleaned up pretty easily

Which oil will you be seasoning it with?

Barry



This flax oil I've ordered:
http://www.swansonvitamins.com/SP002/ItemDetail?n=0
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I don't know about the cooking benefits from flax oil. After working in the garden all weekend, my muscles and joints are very sore. The last thing I need is "reduced fatigue and more energy".

But if you get good results, I may redo my Griswold with the oil.

Barry
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The waffle iron will probably be the most telling, because of the irregular surface and I have 1 plate seasoned with corn oil and will season the other with the flax oil.
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Hope you notch or flag the plates in some manner.

I normally get mixed up, and write the stuff down rather than trusting memory.

Barry
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I have a small skillet that I'm stripping the seasoning off.I will season with soybean oil.My other pans are seasoned with olive oil.An internet friend just stripped his pans and seasoned with flax seed oil and reported that its the best his pans have ever been.
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Hope you notch or flag the plates in some manner.

I normally get mixed up, and write the stuff down rather than trusting memory.

Barry


Ironically, I also happened to think about that, today, Barry - My memory's not too bad, but could be better. I thunk I will probably mark one of the tung oiled wooden handles with a crayola so I don't get mixed up - The mark should come off pretty easily.

I'll also post on the 2 or 3 other skillets - I might season 1 of the 3 with Crisco shortening, just for first-hand comparison purposes. I've tried a generic brand of shortening, but not yet Crisco. The composition of the generic brand on its label is noticeably different than Crisco's.

Bob
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James,

May I ask where you found Soybean oil and is it just soybean oil?

Thanks,
Bob
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I also left a message on an Asian friend's voice mail, to see if I might can steal a cup of soybean oil from them, or locate a local vendor that handles it.
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It's listed as "vegetable oil". I bought the house brand at Stater Brothers stores. most vegetable oils are soybean oil.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soybean_oil
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OK, thanks, James. The vegetable oil I have been using has more polyunsaturated fat than Crisco, 9g vs 8g. It also has a bit more monounsaturated fat, 3g vs 2.5g, and less saturated fat, 2g vs 3g. and 10% vs 16%... not that I'm knowing what all this means, me.

The flax oil should be here by next week. I'll post the information on the label.

Crisco label:

Total Fat: 12g (18%)
Saturated Fat: 3g (16%)
Trans Fat: 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 6g
Monounsaturated Fate: 2.5g

Store brand vegetable oil:

Total Fat: 14g (22%)
Saturated Fat: 2g (10%)
Trans Fat: 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 9g
Monounsaturated Fat: 3g

I believe unsaturated fats have no double bonds, monounsaturated fast have 1 double bond and polyunsaturated fats have more than 1 double bond, and we want to minimize the amount of monounsaturated fat and maximize polyunsaturated fat, and saturated fat is not too bad, as it at least has 1 double bond... if I'm not mistaken, or am I?

Thanks,
Bob
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Lemme change that:

We want to minimize the amount of unsaturated fat and maximize polyunsaturated fat, and monounsaturated fat is not too bad, as it at least has 1 double bond... if I'm not mistaken, or am I?
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Oils with high Iodine Values tend to have low smoke points, correct?

When you're seasoning a pan, you don't care if it smokes. In fact, you want to raise the temp above the smoke point, so the oil bonds securely to the pan.

Contrarily, you don't want to the oil to smoke excessively when you're cooking.

So, a low smoke point oil is likely better for seasoning and a high smoke point oil better for cooking at higher temperatures.

That's how I'm reading the info. Am I reading it correctly?

Thanks,
Bob
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The vegetable oil I have is 100% soybean oil.
Crisco is a blend of soybean and other oils.Crisco consists of a blend of soybean oil, fully hydrogenated cottonseed oil, and partially hydrogenated soybean and cottonseed oils
100% soybean oil is better than crisco.
Crisco is better than other kitchen oils.
Flax seed oil is better than 100% soybean oil but is more expensive and has a shorter shelf life.
I dont think the smoke point tempt. matters.
Check the labels of vegetable oils at the local food market for 100% soybean oil
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I dont think the smoke point tempt. matters.

These comments are from your original link, James, whcih from which I surmized that using an oil with a low smoke point is important for seasoning, thogh not very good for cooking at high temperatures:

The basic idea is this: Smear a food-grade drying oil onto a cast iron pan, and then bake it above the oil’s smoke point. This will initiate the release of free radicals and polymerization. The more drying the oil, the harder the polymer. So start with the right oil.

The reason for the very hot oven is to be sure the temperature is above the oil’s smoke point, and to maximally accelerate the release of free radicals. Unrefined flaxseed oil actually has the lowest smoke point of any oil (see this table). But the higher the temperature the more it will smoke, and that’s good for seasoning (though bad for eating – do not let oils smoke during cooking).


http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-te...

Anymore, when I season a pan, I jack my oven temp up as high as it will go (500 degrees F) and bake the pan until I smell smoke and leave it at that temp until the smoke dissipates somewhat, usually around an hour.

The extra light olive oil I have has a high smoke point - 468 degrees F from charts I've read. It's pretty low in polyunsaturated fat, at 1.5g, compared to Crisco's 6g (and much lower smoking point). The extra light olive oil I have possibly main redeaming quality is that it's monounsaturated fat content is fairly high at 10g, compared to Crisco's 2.5g, so it can form some single double link bonding. It's also somewhat lower in saturated fat at 2g than Crisco's 3g, so it doesn't have quite as much fat without a double link acid chain diluting the fat that does.

Anyway, that's the way I'm understanding what I've read. Correct me if I'm way off base.

Thanks,
Bob
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Anymore, when I season a pan, I jack my oven temp up as high as it will go (500 degrees F) and bake the pan until I smell smoke and leave it at that temp until the smoke dissipates somewhat, usually around an hour.

Incidentally, I bring the pan up to that temp with the oven. I don't want to risk shocking the metal by placing a comparatively cool pan in a hot oven. And, I let the pan cool down with the oven, inside the oven with the door closed.
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I ordered some bamboo utensils to use with my cast iron cookware (and other cookware, including Teflon coated), and salads with acidic dressings and whatnot.

I've had some bamboo spoons sold under Joyce Chen's label for a number of years that I like quite a bit more than using other wood utensils, plastic or metal - pretty good stuff... no splinters, stiff, strong, light weight, water/liquid reistant, pretty impervious to acidic foods, hold up under a decent amount of heat without scorching and no scratchy into metal cooking surfaces.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001B40RM0/ref=ox_sc_act_ti...

The ad sez "Extra Large". I'll have to wait to see about that.
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I dont think the smoke point tempt. matters.


It looks like you're right, James, it doesn't, as long as you heat the oil sufficiently above its smoke point when seasoning, to get good polymerization. (Grape seed oil has a high Iodine Value and a high smoke point (around 420 degrees F.)

Bob
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Lemme change that:

We want to minimize the amount of unsaturated fat and maximize polyunsaturated fat, and monounsaturated fat is not too bad, as it at least has 1 double bond... if I'm not mistaken, or am I?


Bob, a quick organic chemistry lesson:
A animal or vegetable oil (fat or grease, which is just a solid oil) is an ester of three fatty acid bound to a glycerin molecule, which is an alcohol with 3 OH groups.

The ester’s bond can be broken by reacting it with water (and usually a caustic such as lye) in a reaction called saponification (s.p.?) This is how soap is made.

A saturated fat or oil is one which has no double bonds in the fatty acid chains. A monounsaturated oil has one double bond among the fatty acid chains. A polyunsaturated oil has more than one double bond among its fatty acid chains.

A double bond is weaker than a single bond and so is more chemically reactive. It can react with iodine, oxygen, etc. especially at higher temperatures. This is the reason that unsaturated oils “smoke” at lower temperatures than saturated oils, like beef fat (tallow).

All that being true, an oil that has many double bonds (the most reactive) would tend to be the best for seasoning cast iron as it would tend to make a harder, more durable finish than an oil with fewer or no double bonds (saturated oil).

The way the iodine number of an oil is determined is that a standardized iodine solution is dripped into an oil that is mixed with a mutual solvent. The iodine will react with the double bonds in the fatty acid chains forming a single C-C bond and two C-I bonds. When there are no more double bonds left, the next drop of the iodine solution will react with an indicator, probably starch, to give a color change in the solution that you are titrating, turning it from colorless to a blue, in the case of a starch indicator. The more of the iodine solution that you use to get to the blue endpoint, the higher the iodine number and the more double bonds of the oil.
;-)

C.J.V. - don’t axe me about triple bonds and resonance, NO!!!
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Thanks, CJV!! I copied your post to a new thread and asked TMF to add it to the board's FAQ. I hope you don't mind. If you do, I'll ask TMFTwitty to remove it from the FAQ.

Thanks, very much!!

Bob
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My Sister asked me to send her a #9 skillet. I'm aending her the #8 "Erie", instead, as it is the best skillet that I have and she is one on the (2) best sisters that I have. She axed how much I wanted for it - I replied that I would appreciate her mailing address, so I didn't have to search foe it - She would, undoubtedly, do the same, except that she probably knows my address, w/o asking. *sigh*

Bob
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