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The Energy Information Administration has only published monthly data through October of this year.
http://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly/epm_table_grapher.cfm...

But, after making some reasonable assumptions for November and December, I came up with the following CO2 emissions from the electricity sector for 2012.

Coal- 1497 million tonnes CO2
Natural Gas- 556 million tonnes
Petroleum Liquids- 11.1 million tonnes
Petroleum Coke- 10.3 million tonnes
Other Gas plus Other~ 15 million tonnes
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Total- 2090 million tonnes CO2

To calculate these numbers, I used the CO2 emission factors here:
http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/1605/coefficients.html

To compare against previous years, the following link shows the CO2 emitted from the electricity sector (pdf):
http://www.eia.gov/environment/emissions/ghg_report/pdf/tbl7...

If the transportation and other non-electricity sectors produced the same amount of CO2 as they did in 2009, then the total CO2 produced in the US this year will be 5355 million tonnes. This is pretty good. You have to go back to 1995 or so to see a total number this low.
http://www.eia.gov/cfapps/ipdbproject/iedindex3.cfm?tid=90&a...

However, compared to China, the US emissions are relatively flat. The US has been in the range of 5300 to 6000 since 1995. China has gone from 2900 to 8300 during that time.

I don't expect the above numbers to be 100% accurate, but the overall trends are clear. Coal use for electricity in the US is trending down. (Internationally, coal is trending up.) Natural gas and Renewables are trending up. Petroleum for electricity is trending down, but oil is already a very small share of the total for power. Nuclear is down slightly, as plants in California, Nebraska and Florida remain shut down for the foreseeable future. Hydro is somewhat variable depending on the amount of water flow available.

- Pete
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If the transportation and other non-electricity sectors produced the same amount of CO2 as they did in 2009

2009 was the bottom of the Great Recession. Real GDP growth has been about 2% a year since then. So I think a 6% increase in emissions since then would be a good guess.

Elan
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2009 was the bottom of the Great Recession. Real GDP growth has been about 2% a year since then. So I think a 6% increase in emissions since then would be a good guess.

Perhaps not. U.S. emissions declined in 2011, by about 1.7%:

http://iea.org/newsroomandevents/news/2012/may/name,27216,en...

Partially that's due to a mild winder in 2011, but it's also the result of swapping out natural gas for coal in electrical generation and increased fuel efficiency of the motor vehicle fleet. Both of those latter two trends are continuing, so we might continue to see overall declines in U.S. emissions. According to the IEA, since 2006 total U.S. emissions have fallen by more than 7.7% (the largest decrease of any country or region), due partially to these factors - and real GDP is actually up a few points over that time period. So we might continue to see reduced emissions (or more modest increases) even with GDP growth.

Albaby
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2009 was the bottom of the Great Recession. Real GDP growth has been about 2% a year since then. So I think a 6% increase in emissions since then would be a good guess.
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Then that would put total CO2 emissions around 5550 million tonnes this year, instead of 5355. Like I stated, these numbers are estimates, but I still think we are essentially back to CO2 emission levels last seen in the 1990s. The reasons for this could be the offshoring of industry to Asia, plus a current glut of fracked natural gas that makes coal less attractive.

But anyone who wishes to celebrate and declare victory at these developments could be in for a disappointment next May when the Mauna Loa CO2 concentration hits 398 ppm.

- Pete
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According to the IEA, since 2006 total U.S. emissions have fallen by more than 7.7% (the largest decrease of any country or region), due partially to these factors - and real GDP is actually up a few points over that time period.

Population also increased, so emissions per capita of GDP was down more.

DB2
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I still think we are essentially back to CO2 emission levels last seen in the 1990s.

Historical total emissions for the US can be found here:
http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/usa.html
Constant GDP and population numbers are from here:
www.usgovernmentspending.com/us_real_gdp_history

One can then divide emissions by real GDP/capita

2012 est 30.9
1990 41.2
1980 49.9
1970 56.2
1960 49.8
1950 52.0

DB2
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