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I have a GE smooth cooktop electric stove. One burner had been out for a while but I didn’t try to fix it until now. I got the exact GE part, installed it, still nothing. Investigating further I found that the small burner behind it is also not working. Neither is the small “warming zone” centered on the back. Dead.

Three bad switches seems unlikely. The oven works fine.

A real PITA as I hope to put the house on the market next week. 8-(
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Three bad switches seems unlikely. The oven works fine.

The burners are fed by a common, with each burner controlled by a switch. I’d guess the common contact isn’t making it or some variant of that. I suppose there could be two, one for each side, especially if one side has larger coils then they might group to two smaller burners and the warmer together, but on mine all five were connected to the same common.

But I agree, three bad switches seems unlikely.

Bad timing, but then casual lookers/walkers aren’t going to know, and you have time to get it fixed before sale and inspection.
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Local jurisdictions have varying laws - In Tennessee and Georgia you would have a legal obligation to disclose defects you know about. So first off check with your real estate agent about your obligations. If I were in your spot, I would either get it fixed before it hits the market or disclose it with a commitment to have it repaired ASAP.
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I suspect it would be quicker to get a new range installed than to get a repair person out to fix the old one. So, I'd replace the whole thing.

(Assuming it's not new, which I'm guessing is a pretty good assumption.)

When I was prepping my dad's house for sale, I replaced a few things that could've been fixed, because that was quickest, and new things looked better anyway, and I certainly wasn't going to let $$ items delay a $$$$ sale.
I wanted that house on the market as quickly as possible. At the time, it was a bit of a seller's market, and I wanted to sell before that changed.

You're probably in a seller's market now. Time is of the essence.
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I suspect it would be quicker to get a new range installed than to get a repair person out to fix the old one. So, I'd replace the whole thing.

Maybe or maybe not. It took almost 5 months for my dishwasher to arrive after ordering.

PSU
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...It took almost 5 months for my dishwasher to arrive after ordering...

Right, because you ordered what you wanted. For a house I'm selling, I'd just go to Lowes and ask "What do you have in stock?"
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...Investigating further I found that the small burner behind it is also not working...

Suggestion: get the house inspected.

For my first house, I thought I knew everything that was wrong with it, all of which I fixed before putting it on the market. Then the buyer's inspector found a cracked heat exchange in the furnace, so I got a new furnace, which was OK, but I would've been a lot happier if I'd taken care of that ahead of time.

For the next two houses I sold, I had them inspected before putting them on the market, so there'd be no surprises later. In both cases, the inspectors found things I didn't know about. I either fixed or disclosed them.

As a seller, I didn't want surprises; and buyers don't like surprises either.

I hope to put the house on the market next week...

That's cutting it close, but maybe you can get an inspector in tomorrow. Your Realtor should know someone.

Good luck!
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If semiconductors are involved it sounds as if one may have been zapped by a power surge.

Have you tried unplug and then replug to reset the microprocessor (a usual routine for refrigerators)?
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Thanks everyone. I guess I posted that more out of frustration than anything else.

I haven’t unplugged it but I threw the breaker when I replaced the element. Same thing.

The stove is the newest appliance. The Gibson fridge dates back to 1983, as does the Maytag dishwasher. The stove as at least this century. Plan, barring a miracle recovery of the stove,is to disclose the problem and let the new owners deal with all the appliances. Offers can factor in whatever they want, that is their business. The kitchen is vintage 1983; totally not up to today’s standards.

The house has strengths (great neighborhood, fresh paint inside and out, 4 br, 3 bath, huge master suite, etc) and weaknesses (appliances, family room in desperate need of starting over, replacing just three boards on a small deck, etc). The market is supposed to be tight. I guess I will find out!
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Hi RHinCT,

"is to disclose the problem and let the new owners deal with all the appliances."

and

"replacing just three boards on a small deck, etc"


Having worked selling RE a number of years ago, I believe this is a mistake.

I know when I buy an existing home, if it needs $2,000 of repairs, I drop the offer $4,000 or more. I worked with buyers doing the same and sellers that were the victims of it.

Why?

Because the buyer suspects there are more hidden things to repair. If they get an inspection, well, you already know.


Stuff that is simple to repair should be done. It is easier to do while you have the time.

If it becomes an issue as part of an offer, you may be in a time crunch and have to hire someone to do it. Even more expensive.


Does that help you?

Gene
All holdings and some statistics on my Fool profile page
http://my.fool.com/profile/gdett2/info.aspx
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...The kitchen is vintage 1983; totally not up to today’s standards...

In that case, I'd deep clean it and stop there. Buyers are going to think "I'll redo this whole room," and one stove won't make a difference.

Offers can factor in whatever they want...

Normally I'd say "fix everything," but at some point it's pencils down. Sometimes just getting it sold, and getting rid of the responsibility and carrying costs, counts more than squeezing every last penny out of it.

Good luck!
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...great neighborhood...

A lot of good houses in great neighborhoods just get torn down. Buyers don't generally appreciate "good bones." So yeah, clean & paint, done.
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You're selling a house, not appliances. They may want to replace what's there with an expensive Viking range, not what you buy. So, let them inspect, sell is as is, and price in any changes you think will make the sale. My $0.02.
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I hope to put the house on the market next week

Is it on the market now? How's that going?
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Is it on the market now? How's that going?

Yes, finally, thanks for asking. As of late this (Friday) afternoon it is in Zillow and realtor.com. Almost nine months to the day since I closed on my new place. The realtor needs to get more pictures, the light was bad this afternoon. The stove is still the one with 2 working burners, disclaimer provided, but I might have to spring for whatever HD or Lowes has in stock. Though I told the realtor about the stove a while ago, today she mentions you can't get a mortgage (or some at least) without a stove. The lock box is on the front door. At the start of a rainy holiday weekend.

The painters did a great job. The carpet cleaners were unable to fix the worst spots, but they were still worth it. The general cleaners did a lot. I replaced the three worst boards of the deck. The landscapers (grandson, employed by son-in-law) weeded and mulched the beds. I pulled the grass and weeds from around the hostas and irises, and did an extra cleaning on a few key windows. The two front rose bushes are starting to go crazy with flowers. I scrubbed the slate floor where the wood stove used to be and made it passable looking, but never applied olive oil as a couple of sites suggested. I bought a Bona mop for hardwood floors and those look a bit less worn. Replaced a family heirloom dining room light, and a double-tube 8 foot fluorescent in one garage with a light bulb socket, both with the help of the family electrician.

We tried to price it realistically, not greedily; I'm assuming that if we priced it low the market will take care of that. If it is too high, the market will tell us that too. (My granddaughter in VT had a house they were looking at grabbed by someone from out of state who ever saw it in person. I don't expect anything that crazy.)

Now we wait.
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Hi RHinCT,

"someone from out of state who ever saw it in person."

I know what you mean. The first offer we received on this place was "sight unseen" by someone over in Dallas, kind of low-ball. We countered and let their response die at that point.

Our current contract came in and was countered. They came up a little and said it was their final offer. I left it lay unanswered for a couple of days to allow for 2 additional showings.

The day after the showings, they signed my original counter and it is in the hands of the title company.

Now we just hold on as the various pieces click into place, hopefully without issue.


Gene
All holdings and some statistics on my Fool profile page
http://my.fool.com/profile/gdett2/info.aspx
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I know what you mean. The first offer we received on this place was "sight unseen" by someone over in Dallas, kind of low-ball. We countered and let their response die at that point.

We sold one last fall. The first offer was a lowball, then we got two competing bids. We chose the higher (since they were both cash) and all was well until the inspection. Which was not bad, but the chosen buyers - we found out - had never seen the house (they lived a couple states away), they bought it on the recommendation of a realtor. They backed out over essentially minor issues.

When that collapsed our realtor, who had been showing it all along, called back several of the “interesteds”; we had a bid within days at full ask. A different inspection turns up some minor issues which we addressed. Closed. Done.

The buyers who backed out refused to let anyone see the inspection report, since “they paid for it”. Both our realtor and theirs said that was “highly unusual”, since they got no profit from having spent that $800, and any other buyer probably wouldn’t rely on someone else’s inspection.

Anyway, happy ending. But fraught, at least for a while. Total time: about a month. With several months of “prep”, including an complete interior repaint, carpet clean, etc.
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Which was not bad, but the chosen buyers - we found out - had never seen the house (they lived a couple states away), they bought it on the recommendation of a realtor. They backed out over essentially minor issues.
...
The buyers who backed out refused to let anyone see the inspection report, since “they paid for it”.



Yes, depending on how it is worded, the home inspection is a get out of contract not quite free card. In the states I've been active in real estate, however, if you use the inspection report as an excuse to get out of a contract, you have to provide that report.

We once bought a house that had fallen out of contract due to the termite inspection clause which said something along the lines of "to buyer's satisfaction." The first buyers showed up to closing with their lawyer, who when questioned what was it about the termite inspection that the buyer's had a problem with simply said "They are not satisfied." and that was that. It was a huge rehab and they no doubt had buyer's remorse.

IP
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The house I am selling isn't really a fixer-upper, but is far from perfect. In theory I have no intention of doing anything to it to accommodate a buyer. They can offer me what they are willing to pay, and I can decide to accept it, or not, or counter. Time will tell.
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...In theory I have no intention of doing anything to it to accommodate a buyer... Time will tell.

Exactly. When listing my house, and my dad's, I told my Realtors, "I'm selling this 'as is.' But don't put that in the listing."
Because, even though I'd done so much already that I felt done, done, and done, if a buyer offered enough money (or if, heaven forbid, I got only one offer), I might've done a little more.

Buyers of my house (2018) asked for nothing. They'd done a pre-offer inspection, and didn't even have an inspection contingency.
Buyers of my dad's house (2019) asked for a couple of minor things:
- adjust the garage door opener so the door re-opened if it hit an obstacle, which I was happy to do (and was a little taken aback that it needed doing), and
- fix a broken chain on a window. I said I'd "look into" having the window fixed, and they withdrew the request, luckily. The window was functional, was just counterbalanced by one chain instead of two, so lacked the ideal redundancy. And, I suspect it wasn't fixable. A lot of other homeowners in the development had had their windows replaced, which I doubt they would've done if the original builder-grade double-pane windows still worked or were fixable.
- They didn't ask for radon remediation, which I would've been perfectly happy to do. That's an easier fix than replacing windows. I'd never tested for radon, because the house had a walk-out basement, so I thought it highly unlikely that radon would've accumulated. But I was there when the inspector arrived to pick up his testing equipment, and he showed me the results: 4.0. At or above 4, you're supposed to remediate. But I waited until the info got to the buyers & Realtors, and my Realtor called quickly to say, "Do nothing! They don't care about radon." Which made me wonder why they'd tested for it, but OK.

Best wishes for multiple offers, of which at least one is very good, and for smooth sailing through closing!
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The house I am selling isn't really a fixer-upper, but is far from perfect. In theory I have no intention of doing anything to it to accommodate a buyer. They can offer me what they are willing to pay, and I can decide to accept it, or not, or counter. Time will tell. - RGinCT

---------------------

Sometimes the buyer may agree with you but if he is getting a mortgage, his bank enters the picture.

I sold a investment house once that had a big tree shading the front porch and driveway. Beautiful tree, been there 50 years, not hurting a thing. The buyer was getting a VA loan and the regulations said in order to approve the buyers loan, the tree had to be cut down because it was too close to the driveway.
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Good point about the mortgage. I will have to wait and see what come sup. There are two showings scheduled for today that I have heard of.
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The housing market is crazy around here. We went with my daughter to look at a house. The seller moved the final offers date and time from Sunday at 6:00pm to 4:00pm Saturday. Instead of having a private time slot to view the house, they booked multiple viewings at the same time. There were two other agents with clients in the house when we were there. More showed up as we left. It had the look of an open house without being an open house.

My daughter put in a very aggressive $77k over list offer with $30k due diligence money. She didn't win.

PSU
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My daughter put in a very aggressive $77k over list offer with $30k due diligence money. She didn't win. -- PSU

Crazy stuff like that tempts me to put our house up for sale, then turn around and contract with a builder for another new one. I've heard of crazy pricing here in Charlotte, but haven't seen it in our general locale in South Charlotte.

Rob
Rule Breaker Home Fool & STMP/MTH Maintenance Coverage Fool
He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.
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Building new with the current price of materials sounds risky.

https://amp.charlotteobserver.com/news/nation-world/national...
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Building new with the current price of materials sounds risky. -- RH

Yeah, high prices. But I wouldn't act as general contractor. Been there, done that, painful. Contract with a big builder (with the current high prices). Yeah, high priced home, but you get what you want and all housing prices will reflect the cost of the new homes anyway. Unless they need work.

Except for one brief instance, we've always moved into a new home that we either contracted or acted as GC. Current one is now three years old or so.

Rob
Rule Breaker Home Fool & STMP/MTH Maintenance Coverage Fool
He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.
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