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No. of Recommendations: 2
Says he works 2-3 hours day. In that case, I'd demand $500,000/yr for an actual 40-hr work week. <LOL>

https://www.quora.com/I%E2%80%99m-bored-at-my-well-paying-re...

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intercst
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No. of Recommendations: 7
I'm definitely not 30 but in all honesty, I've been bored with jobs most of my life. And it is worse at large companies (especially defense contractors) because the standard for getting stuff done is so low or maybe the average engineer is so bad.

The past couple of years I'm getting over that salary but except for a rare day, I can get my work done in a few hours and still meet/exceed all schedules. I spend the remainder of the time reading financial, sports, technology stuff (even doing some problems over at codewars) and no one complains.

Once in a while I have a challenging problem that takes nearly my full day and afterwards I go "Geez, that was nice. I actually had a real problem and had to use my brain"

And yeah in the past I have complained at various companies about being bored but I try to be careful. I would like to be challenged for my 40 hrs a week but have zero interest in more than 40 hrs. I recently told one manager that the company has no interest in top engineers but seem to prefer marginal ones so they can bill more and more hours to the government.

Years ago when I was just starting out I met up with a sales engineer and an application engineer representing a distributor (we were doing hardware and buying a lot of ICs). I recall the app engineer telling me his story of working at Westinghouse and one day told his boss he was done his work. His boss then got upset because he was done ahead of schedule and now he had to find him another billable task.

I realize this could be alien for those in other industries/companies but any of my friends could tell you how many times I have complained about being bored at work. And most companies have done stuff to de-incentivize employees and remove loyalty from them by eliminating pensions, providing safe harbor instant vesting of matching money (a rare change that benefits the employee), no stock options, no annual bonus, etc.

Fortunately I'm nearing the finish line and I can often ignore the corporate or government BS and do whatever interests me.

I've often wished instead of being required to work 40 hrs instead they would just give you a task and when you are done you can go home and still get paid based on the task and not the hours. That was one advantage of school. If person A could do the homework/study/etc. 1 hour a week and get his/hers "A" and Person B took 10 hrs to get their "A" well that is life but person A didn't have to waste 9 hours looking busy.

Oh well, there are worse problems to have in life :)
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No. of Recommendations: 0
So live cheap, retire in 5 and travel....
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No. of Recommendations: 4
Ironically, they want me to be bored. Not officially, of course. But if I'm having to look for stuff to do, then that's a good thing. If I'm busy, then that means there is a serious problem (often involving scrapping of material, etc).

Usually I'm bored. Trivial tasks, some data analysis, that sort of thing. But every now and then we have a problem that makes me not bored. In those instances I sometimes have to stay late, come in on Saturdays, etc.

But they really don't want me to be busy because of the nature of my job.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Especially in technology many professionals owe their job security to a "fire department" philosophy. They are hired to address any problem that comes up. When things are going smoothly, job can be boring.

Of course that makes time for coffee breaks. And some read books, or comics, surf the internet, or chat with friends.

Checking out developing technologies, training for new responsibilities, safety, etc, etc, are good uses of that time.

We all face the day when skills are out of date. Keeping current with new developments in your field is up to you.
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No. of Recommendations: 0
One of my pet peeves is the excessive documentation we do for defense work. Literally the huge majority of an engineer's time in this place is spent on documentation. In theory there are reasons for it but in practice it just wastes time and money.

I'm changing some tests/code and things don't work in one case. Eventually I track it down to me using what is documented in the test document as opposed to going into code and seeing what the bits actually were. Fortunately I spent the time using Excel to break out all of the bits and did a comparison. Mindless work which is why I'm leaving instead of coasting here.

The more places things are documented (code, documents, etc.) the more likely errors will be made or things in one place get updated and not updated elsewhere (especially since no engineer really wants to waste time on writing documents).

At least today I can listen to the Orioles doubleheader (rained out last night) most of the day with the time difference it started mid morning here in AZ.
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No. of Recommendations: 15
As an IT worker:

Everything is running smoothly:

“What the heck do you guys do all day?”

Everything is blowing up:

“What the heck do you guys do all day?”
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Someone should suggest the concept of retirement to the poor person.

Howie52
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Or maybe career change.

Make life interesting. Start your own business. Consulting?
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No. of Recommendations: 2
My big problem was the new young turk bosses that had to be honestly busy all the time, running around micro-managing, holding meetings all day long.

Just go back to your cube and start browsing!
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No. of Recommendations: 13
Hey there !

If you guys (gals) really, really, really don't want to be bored, try farming. Yeah, the new machinery is really nice but there's enough work away from the machines to keep boredom away. There's always something different to do. Of course during spring and fall work you're going to be putting in 18+ hour days and with livestock you just can't set a schedule ... most of them can't read very well.

Rich (haywool) at home on the farm raising - wait for it - alfalfa and sheep with corn and beans thrown in
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No. of Recommendations: 6
My late grandmother grew up very poor on a farm. She was barely 5 ft 90lbs and one of the hardest working people around. Everything made by scratch including noodles for soup. When floors had to be cleaned she would get on her hands and knees to scrub then clean. And exceptionally generous. You quickly learned that if she asked you "do you like x?" And if said yes, she would get it and give it to you so I had to learn to say "yes but I don't need any now". Made phenomenal pancakes and super thin sugar cookies.

I wouldn't last a week on a farm. At least atmy current age. Too much labor.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Had several periods of 'spinning wheels' at work - often during budget 'freezes' for one reason or another -- that could last a while.

Last couple years were half that - had a 'project' that everyone knew was busy work so spent a few hours a week 'working on it' - and a lot of time doing just about everything else from time in the 'library' to reading 'journals' , etc. Computer time.... came in right on time, left right on time, took 1 1/2 lunch - going to gym for 45 min - the secret was 'leave early'....and come back 'on time' ....that's all that people noticed.

Didn't get much better - occasional periods of actual work but mostly not - company in trouble. Had opportunity to bail early and took it.....

Had 31 years in the industry - probably first 25 very good. Last six years a toss up - sometimes fun, sometimes 'boring' as heck as far as 'work' goes, but kept 'busy' doing 'stuff'. Easy to decide to leave troubled industry - and six months later the telecom industry cratered and 20,000 jobs in telecom corridor in TX vanished. Might not have even had 'that job' if I had not quit. Engineers are often first to be fired when it's crunch time.


t.
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No. of Recommendations: 17
My grandparents had a farm. They were always working at something. They didn't have livestock when I was a kid (they did when my mom was growing up), and my grandfather spent all summer growing stuff, and the winter months fixing stuff. My grandmother semi-retired from her full time school cook job and worked part time until she was almost 80. My grandfather had worked an outside job, too, before he retired because of an injury. In addition to her outside work, my grandmother helped in the garden, canned food, made her own lye soap, and she was always cleaning something. I remember being a kid at their house listening to Paul Harvey and the Opry (they didn't have a TV, so a radio show was like the coolest thing to this kid in the 70's!) while my grandmother either mended or worked on her quilting and my grandfather polished his church shoes. Most nights they went to bed right after the sun went down...

I see now it wasn't a bad way to live. I think of them and their life often. My grandmother lived to be 86 and my grandfather 94 (despite a typical breakfast of fried sausage, several fried eggs, and fried potatoes--pretty much every single morning!).
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I'm on Quora, and have found that a lot of questions are posted by idiots and "bots." Some people like to just get a ridiculous argument started. There was one "entity" (not sure if a person, bot or something else) who posted over 10,000 questions and had never answered a question. I don't know what the (financial?) incentive would be to post that many questions, so obviously there's a lot behind the scenes that I'm not aware of.

Because of my specialty and from having answered certain types of questions in the past, Quora often sends Emails asking me to answer specific questions, but they lack ALL relevant information...imagine a mechanic getting asked "what's wrong with my car" without the make, model and year being listed.
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I'm on Quora, and have found that a lot of questions are posted by idiots and "bots." Some people like to just get a ridiculous argument started. There was one "entity" (not sure if a person, bot or something else) who posted over 10,000 questions and had never answered a question. I don't know what the (financial?) incentive would be to post that many questions, so obviously there's a lot behind the scenes that I'm not aware of.

Because of my specialty and from having answered certain types of questions in the past, Quora often sends Emails asking me to answer specific questions, but they lack ALL relevant information...imagine a mechanic getting asked "what's wrong with my car" without the make, model and year being listed.


You can probably say the same about some of the questions posted on the bogleheads forum. Someone posts "Can I afford x?" and then you see they are making $400K and have $4M+ in assets. Yeah, I think you can.

There was the story a while ago where some guy got caught outsourcing his work to China (I think). He paid them a small amount while pocketing the difference. His company wasn't too happy.
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There was the story a while ago where some guy got caught outsourcing his work to China (I think). He paid them a small amount while pocketing the difference. His company wasn't too happy.

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Outstanding. Outsourcing rarely benefits the employee.

intercst
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