No. of Recommendations: 1
Holy crap. I wouldn't want to be a democrat facing election:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/theapothecary/2013/10/31/obama-o...

How many people are exposed to these problems? 60 percent of Americans have private-sector health insurance—precisely the number that Jay Carney dismissed. As to the number of people facing cancellations, 51 percent of the employer-based market plus 53.5 percent of the non-group market (the middle of the administration’s range) amounts to 93 million Americans.

Bear in mind this is when the employer mandate kicks in.

I've read the argument that says that plans that are out there today are somehow inadequate. Speaking for my plan, I like it. It's cheap, it does what I want, and it fits my needs exactly. Cancel it and I'll be hopping mad.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Yep,

Millions of pizzed off hard working Americans, pizzed off at cancelled policies and replacement options that cost double all because of Obamacare. This anger will be multiplied by Obama/Democrat lies of "if you like your policy you can keep it" and "it will reduce your premiums by $2,500 per year".

Bad for Democrats (long term)
Good for Republicans (long term)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Were it not for Ted Cruz sabotaging ObamaCare this would have all been working weeks ago, and the deficit would have been resolved and we would all be better looking too!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I didn't know one man was that powerful. Certainly not Obama.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Exactly. What the dims forgot is that a government shutdown is a temporary thing. Obamacare? Heh. That'll go on forever.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Obamacare? Heh. That'll go on forever.
______________

I know it's Halloween, but why are you saying such scary things...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Speaking for my plan, I like it. It's cheap, it does what I want, and it fits my needs exactly.

Obviously don't the details of your cheap plan, but I suspect that although you like it now, you won't if you get sick and end up needing a better one. You'll also be able to find affordable insurance even if some insurance company bureaucrat decides you have some kind of pre-existing condition that used to allow them to deny coverage.

That said, O'care is an abomination. We should copy the French.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Obviously don't the details of your cheap plan, but I suspect that although you like it now, you won't if you get sick and end up needing a better one. You'll also be able to find affordable insurance even if some insurance company bureaucrat decides you have some kind of pre-existing condition that used to allow them to deny coverage.

This isn't correct. My plan covers everything. My out of pocket is capped at $1800 a year.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
This isn't correct. My plan covers everything. My out of pocket is capped at $1800 a year.

You said it was cheap. How's that possible? What's you annual premium?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
You said it was cheap. How's that possible? What's you annual premium?

Zero. My employer pays $4600 or thereabouts. It's an HSA.

HSA's are freaking awesome. Not only do I get a tax shield, but the money is there in an account and is portable. I pay cash for doctor visits, prescriptions and the like up until I hit my out of pocket limit.

If Obama really wanted to break the relationship between employers and health insurance he should have jacked up HSA participation.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
You said it was cheap. How's that possible? What's your annual premium?

Zero. My employer pays $4600 or thereabouts. It's an HSA.


An HSA isn't insurance.

If you have $10,000 in an HSA, were to be badly hurt in a car accident and get a $100,000 hospital bill, who'd pay the extra $90,000?



If Obama really wanted to break the relationship between employers and health insurance he should have jacked up HSA participation.

The max contribution is $6,450, so you're still $1,850 under the limit.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
An HSA isn't insurance.

If you have $10,000 in an HSA, were to be badly hurt in a car accident and get a $100,000 hospital bill, who'd pay the extra $90,000?
______________

Well, when the details come out, this is exactly the type of "choices" the exchanges are offering.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
An HSA isn't insurance.

If you have $10,000 in an HSA, were to be badly hurt in a car accident and get a $100,000 hospital bill, who'd pay the extra $90,000?



HSA's require a high-dectable catastrophic coverage plan.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
* HSAs
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Well, when the details come out, this is exactly the type of "choices" the exchanges are offering.

Wrong. The various plans on the exchanges are all insurance plans. There's no annual or lifetime coverage limits. HSA's are not insurance. When they run out, you pay everything else out of pocket.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Wrong. The various plans on the exchanges are all insurance plans. There's no annual or lifetime coverage limits. HSA's are not insurance. When they run out, you pay everything else out of pocket.
______________

Is it your contention that there are no geographic boundries and limited providers that would make those limits (meaning deductible amount you are responsible for) null and void?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
HSA's require a high-dectable catastrophic coverage plan.

Oh. But Dope says he pays no insurance premiums.

Anyway, is this how it works?

You (or your employer) max out an HSA at $6,500 and you use that money to pay for doctors visits, etc. Then you buy a high-deductible, say $5,000, catastrophic coverage plan for about $100/mo. with an out-of-pocket limit of $4,000.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Anyway, is this how it works?

You (or your employer) max out an HSA at $6,500 and you use that money to pay for doctors visits, etc. Then you buy a high-deductible, say $5,000, catastrophic coverage plan for about $100/mo. with an out-of-pocket limit of $4,000



Exactly.

My wife and I would put in the max contribution, and the IRS-required high-deductible plan cost us $210 monthly (through Humana). $10,000 deductible, and I forget about the out-of-pocket limit.

As a side point, we chose an HSA plan administrator that allowed the full range of investment options available to tax-advantaged accounts, so I trade stocks and options in the HSA account just as I do with retirement accounts. We have so few health care expenditures that we just pay them out of pocket, and the HSA is therefore growing nicely.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
It's a lot harder for most to use an HSA now because of the premiums. Wisely, many companies have the HSA incorporated with even the new ACA plans. For younger people especially, they're fantastic.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
This isn't correct. My plan covers everything. My out of pocket is capped at $1800 a year.
_____________

could you expand on this???
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
It's an HSA. I don't pay anything out of pocket for the plan itself. My employer kicks in $4k. The deductible is ~$1500, so I pay cash for check ups, prescriptions, etc. After the deductible is hit, it goes to 90/10 (policy pays 90, I pay 10%) until I hit the out of pocket limit. After that the plan pays 100%.

The point is, there are, excuse me, WERE plans out there that were both cheap and provided great insurance. Obamacare did away with all that. It would have been super simple to just expand HSA's but since those were right wing ideas he was never going to.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I understand the HSA part, but the 90/10 piece is an actual insurance policy. What I had was an higher deductible plan with an HSA rider, not dissimilar to the new HSA setups. It had a higher deductible, but it was far cheaper, allowing the HSA to flourish.

Yes, there were some great plans that were offered in many areas, no longer available. Can you imagine the delight of many had they properly marketed them?

I used to envision a system whereby you could wrap a SS and an HSA account into similar structure.
Print the post Back To Top