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URL:  https://boards.fool.com/priceperformance-comparisons-12046397.aspx

Subject:  Price/performance comparisons Date:  2/25/2000  11:31 AM
Author:  dbau Number:  19 of 61

More price-point information on Quantum's Snap 4000 vs competition

All the numbers are approximate, because I haven't dug up the exact specifications on all the products. And the prices are all sure to change rapidly. But it gives a feel for how Quantum's attack will work: they're going to go for a decisive win on price/performance. It's not 100% clear that this kind of approach will win the war in the end, because IT is willing to pay a premium for reliability and maintainability (see the message board link at the bottom). So the Snap products must be reliable and cheap to administer also.

If they can do that, then the key in the price/performance game will be to hug the "Moore's law of magnetic storage" curve closely and climb it more quickly than their competitors.

Some prices:

Network appliance F720 estimate $30,000/100GB, which is $300/GB
http://www.zerowait.com/price1.html

Procom NF100-R-80 direct from procom $10,164/100GB, which is $101/GB
http://marketingdb.procom.com/procom/product.asp?dept%5Fid=301&pf%5Fid=NF100%2DR%2D80

Cobalt NasRAQ street $2,214/32GB, which is $69/GB
search on http://buycomp.com for NasRAQ

Quantum Snap 2000 list $1799/40GB, which is $45/GB
http://www.cdw.com/shop/search/results.asp?key=snap+server

Quantum Snap 4000 proposed $3000/120GB, which is $25/GB
(from the DSS press release)


For some customer perspective, here's a message board of NTAP administrators:

http://teaparty.mathworks.com:1999/toasters/index.html#904

It's interesting to note that one of the things the administrators spend a lot of time thinking about is how to backup their NAS boxes on DLT (Quantum) tape libraries. So this community is already a Quantum customer - for the backup product....

It's also interesting to read that NTAP considers themselves a software company that must sell hardware to move its product. I wonder what Quantum's point of view is. The lesson from the PC business is that it can pay to divide software companies from hardware companies - it frees up the hardware vendors to follow Moore's law to win on price/perf while the software vendors deal with the integration issues and add functionality.
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