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URL:  https://boards.fool.com/i-am-surprised-that-more-folks-have-not-responded-12374872.aspx

Subject:  Re: Taxes projections for Early Retirement Date:  4/10/2000  4:09 PM
Author:  Chipsboss Number:  7740 of 881506

I am surprised that more folks have not responded to this thread

I didn't respond sooner because I think my case is not of general interest and posting it is redundant. Here's a sketch of it anyway, since TMF's search function seems out of order today:
• age 60,
• retired for seven years,
• no dependents or heirs,
• no debts (house is paid off),
• (very) small corporate pension started, no COLA
• (rashly?) planning to draw social security starting at age 65 and 4 months,
• managing the retirement stash to hold both its purchasing power and my after-tax standard of living as level as possible for the next 35 years,
• that stash is over 30 years worth of my after-tax budget and mostly in an IRA
• only small withdrawals (around 2%) from the IRA in my 60's, then the legal minimum withdrawals thereafter
• 4% real return annually on assets invested chiefly in S&P 500 index fund
• 4% annual inflation
• 6% annual return (dividends and realized capital gains) in the taxable account, with the other 2% return being unrealized capital gains

Results of my predictions:

During my 60's, my income taxes will average 17% of my income and 0.6% of my financial assets per year; thereafter, my income taxes will average over 23% of my income and 2% of those assets per year. The tax jump comes from the required IRA withdrawals after age 70. The benefits of tax-deferred growth are so great that depleting my IRA faster would not benefit me given my determination not to erode the purchasing power of the retirement assets.

For this, I need a 2.95% withdrawal rate in my 60's and a 4.0% thereafter. So, I achieve independent results quite consistent with the safe withdrawal rate studies. That feels good.

Chips, planning to avoid estate taxes by bequeathing most of these assets to a tax-exempt foundation
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