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Subject:  Re: We have a winner! Date:  10/24/2002  12:16 PM
Author:  exwa Number:  199732 of 2321398

Why do you think there is no prominent Muslim movement against the extremists?

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It isn't that one does not exist, it is just that the mainstream press is not interested in coming to the masaajid where my father-in-law speaks, denouncing the radical wahaabi extremists who have hijacked our religion. It is not interested in reporting on the works of Khaled Abou El Fadel, who rips apart the radical wahabbi views one by one in his books. It is not interested in articles like this:

http://www.theamericanmuslim.org/2002sept_comments.php?id=112_0_14_60_C

It is true that Abrahamic religions teach that God is Just and that the implementation of justice is part of God's purposes for human societies. Muslims, in general, believe that God's sacred law, the Sharia, provides the scales of justice for Muslim polity. But who are these people who arrogate the right to define the parameters of divine justice, and inflict destruction on human society in the name of the Sharia? I am wondering how can God's religion become a source of terror and meaningless destruction? Did God send humans on earth to destroy one another in His name? Or, did He send them to live in peace and harmony?

I continued to search for the religious sources of terrorism, if there were any, available to the extremists in the scriptures or in the tradition ascribed to the Prophet (pbuh). As I searched, I became aware that the term jihad, which is commonly used by these terrorists to legitimize their criminality, does not appear in the meaning of "holy war against the infidels" at all. In fact, terrorism, in any form, does not qualify as anything more than a cowardly act and an expression of rejection of God's blessing of life. To be sure, the term "jihad" in the lexicon of these murderers does not appear in more than a contrived meaning to cover up the horror of their satanic behavior.

But this tone of false religiosity and misappropriation of religious teachings was not limited to these murderers. I was deeply troubled as I surfed the cyberspace and read some of the morally bankrupt comments about the tragedy circulated by self-righteous Muslim preachers and teachers and their lack of outrage in condemning terrorism in uncertain terms. Almost every other Muslim leader or preacher was trying to provide an answer to: "Why do Muslims hate America?" The question manifested a distorted way of thinking about Islamic ethics of interpersonal relationships. No attempt was spared to rationalize the horrendous act by justifying it either in political terms as the crisis connected with American foreign policy in the Middle East, or in religious terms as God's punishment for the arrogance of Americans. Were not these same people arrogant in attributing the event to some far-fetched conspiracy? Such a defensive reflex of their thought was rooted in their lack of understanding of their ethical responsibility in the face of terrorism in the name of Islam. I was amazed at the arrogance of these Muslims, which allowed them to use God's name and remembrance as a tool to destroy human lives and property. What kind of God do they believe in? I kept on asking over and over again.


There are some other great articles at that site: http://www.theamericanmuslim.org/2002sept.php

The next logical question is whether or not these individuals are impacting the broad Muslim population. Sadly, I must admit that the progress is slow. The Saudis have been exporting their brand of Islam for many years now, and it is appealing to many people. What they want is an Islam which is black and white. Where good and evil, halal (permissible) and haram (forbidden) are easily defined. They do not realize this is not how Islam truly is, and that in order to get this, one has to be an extremist and have a myopic view of the religion. In most cases this simply creates intolerant individuals, who still in their heart of hearts are good people and would never harm another soul. Unfortunately, the far end of that spectrum breeds extremist elements, some of whom are terrorists.

The brainwashing has gone on for a long time. Those who are attempting to counteract it are often branded heretics, but there is a fast growing segment of the Muslim population who are waking up to the fact that these 'heretics' are not that at all. These people have been engaging in this work long before 9/11, but one of the good things that has happened after that day is that it has been a 'wake up call' to the entire Muslim community. It has made even the common person more aware that something is gravely wrong if such murderous individuals can be coming from our ranks. So we continue our work on an individual level, and also on a community level. This goes completely unnoticed by almost everyone else, as it is not 'newsworthy' by CNN's standards.

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