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URL:  https://boards.fool.com/i-have-mainly-been-in-computers-for-16-years-i-19919260.aspx

Subject:  Re: Lawn Care Date:  11/29/2003  12:48 AM
Author:  clairence Number:  9147 of 15031

I have mainly been in computers for 16 years.
I love talking to people. Meeting new people. Helping them achieve their goals.
my background is in software for the printing industry...but it is dying a not-so-slow death.


And why is the printing industry dying a rapid death? Is it because printing projects can now be done on PC's by homebodies and entry-level office workers? (That's just my guess)

Well, who helps them with their projects? Who could expand their knowledge about how their *printing software* works and *help them achieve their goals* more quickly and easily?

I don't know *the printing industry*, but Microsoft has a certification program for folks who go around training people on Word or Excel or Access. I believe they get paid pretty darn well. Intuit charges hundreds of dollars on Quickbooks seminars.

So, is there a PrintShop certification program? I really doubt it. That's even better; fewer startup requirements. It seems like you've already got a definite rent-a-nerd niche if you choose to go that direction. Start a *make your print work stand out* seminar series. Offer in-your-office printing assistance. Show lawn care-takers how to put together really nice flyers and cards....


I can relate to your passion "problem". The fact that you learned each industry you worked in shows that your passion is not "for nothing", but it's "for everything". The hard part is finding a specialty, because it feels so limiting. There's so much in the world to do, to master, to accomplish... why focus on just one thing? Our time here is finite; you gotta take everything in.

I can do anything. And I have done many things. And later, after I wasn't doing them any more, I didn't really miss them. But they're still part of who I am- my history, my experience. Nobody has the same experiences I do; nor do they have the experiences you do.
Think about how your experiences shaped you and motivated you. Look at them as puzzle pieces. Try and fit them together in as many different combinations as you can think of. Because that's where the big idea-- your idea-- will be found. Just as my experiences are different from yours, my answer is going to be different from yours. And sometimes the questioning itself is the answer.

Alright... it must be past my bedtime if I'm talking like a shrink.
I hope some of that is helpful.



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