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URL:  https://boards.fool.com/hawkwin-ltltlti-am-also-concerned-because-32160889.aspx

Subject:  Re: Attitude Question - SS Date:  3/15/2016  5:18 PM
Author:  JAFO31 Number:  79368 of 97361

Hawkwin:

<<<I am also concerned because this feels like a "nose under the tent strategy" to abolish or significantly revise or abolish SS."

"Take your slippery slope fallacy someplace else."

"The Slippery Slope is a fallacy in which a person asserts that some event must inevitably follow from another without any argument for the inevitability of the event in question."
https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=slippery+slope

In this thread you previously wrote - "None of that has anything to do with whether or not someone gets back at least what they put in."

and

"The system needs some ownership. Many poor can't afford to save more money than what they are FORCED to put into SS. Give them ownership of that money so when they die, any remaining balance is given to their family - help break the cycle of generational poverty by giving people ownership of their retirement income."

It seems pretty clear to me that you firmly believe in a "refund of premium" concept with respect to SS taxes.

But while you defaulted a slippery slope reference above, you totally ignored my quote from the article you cited that shows there are plenty of other people (i.e., other than those who die young) who also fail to collect as much as the amount paid in taxes, which I have repeated below:

"A projection by Favreault of Social Security data found that 82 percent of individuals who live to age 85 get back more in benefits than then pay in taxes; about 52 percent of those who die between 75 and 84 come out ahead. Meanwhile, just 21 percent of those who die between 62 and 69 get back more than they put in to the system.

Those that die young are not the only ones who collect less than the amount paid in taxes - - - 79% who die b/w 62 (generally speaking, the earliest collection age)- 69 receive less, 48% of those between 75-84 receive less [Note - curious that age 70-74 bracket was omitted], and even 18% of those who live to age 85 receive less.

I took you at your word that you wanted to assure that everyone "gets back at least what they put in".

Why is it a slippery slope to assume that you mean what you wrote and would apply in generally?

Regards, JAFO
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