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URL:  https://boards.fool.com/this-is-a-topic-that-i-know-a-lot-about-the-33011083.aspx

Subject:  Re: OT: The Future of Programming Date:  3/13/2018  4:32 AM
Author:  Casciman Number:  90919 of 118052

This is a topic that I know a lot about. The Venezuelan Captain has me grayed out but that is his problem.

I got into programming when I was 36. I spent 10 years in teaching and then put my “retirement money” towards going back to school. That is called going “all in”.

It worked out for me. I’ve been comfortably retired for ten years, with the last year being my most successful, investment-wise. Thanks, Donald Trump.

I skipped all the old IBM junk and went straight into C Unix programming for the miltary industrial complex. At the forefront of the Internet (Arpanet) we (SRI) had a lot of fun introducing the internet protocols to the US Army. Way before the public internet happened.

I left teaching because I wanted to work with the smartest people in the world. I was not disappointed. It was a conscious and deliberate decision.

Programmers come in many stripes. I’ve since hired and fired dozens of them. Some are not really that bright. Others are smart but misdirected. Most lack personal awareness skills. Once in awhile you run into somebody who can do the nerd work and also work with actual people. Some are as verbal as anybody on this board. But that is unusual.

That was my role, and people paid me well to bridge the gap between normal people and gifted nerds. The difference was that I could be the high output nerd if it was necessary. In this world, you only get street cred by doing, not talking.

In summary, I ran into many extremely bright people in the software business. I have no regrets in that department. But I also ran into plain weirdos, smart guys who could not connect with user issues, coders with no apparent talent, and your normal low achievers.

Top coders, who eventually turn into team leaders, who can actually verbalize, are worth their weight. These people are hard to find and need to be paid a lot of money because they make a difference.

If you have a smart kid then you simply can’t go wrong directing that person to software development. I’ve helped many in this regard and their results have been fabulous. It’s not for everybody. Most simply are not smart enough. We are way out at the far right of the Bell Curve, where only males exist, it appears. Look at the stats and make your own decision.

Casciman
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