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URL:  https://boards.fool.com/i-don39t-know-that-there-are-any-legal-34531023.aspx

Subject:  Re: Looking For Albaby Date:  6/9/2020  11:41 AM
Author:  mzee20 Number:  2314382 of 2332230

I don't know that there are any legal barriers to doing that - but there are enormous practical barriers to doing so, especially in smaller cities or very expensive cities.

Agreed. Also, making sure that the officers indeed reside in the city. One city I lived in dropped the requirement years ago because there were so many cheaters who used dummy addresses, etc. It's bad form to hire officers who lie easily, so best not to challenge them. It is incumbent on cities to pay officers enough to fulfill the requirement. Maybe it should be like a military base or parsonage system, where the officers move into homes in the neighborhoods where they can live for free. If the force shrinks sufficiently, it might be doable.

So many city neighborhoods look pretty stable demographically, but in fact are transient stop-offs for residents who move on to 'burbs to raise the kids, or retirement communities in the Sun Belt, to be replaced by others moving in from their last stop. Potential officers are no different. In addition, while officers tend to try to stay with the same organization through to retirement, most people, including their spouses, change jobs multiple times. If the officer has to move to a new jurisdiction, it can be very hard financially as they basically start from scratch at the new place. These are all issues that are correctable, but will take time to work through the government bureaucracy and will be resisted by the police unions. That is why defunding and replacement is so attractive to me.

I wonder if we made it easier for officers to transfer between departments if some of the problems we see will disappear even without a residency requirement. How much corruption and misconduct depends on a lifetime of compromises and quid pro quo's built up among a stable group of officers? It would require a more standardized evaluation system so public safety organizations can assure they're not getting a problem officer, but it might also lead to a more professional force.

Lots to consider...
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