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URL:  https://boards.fool.com/investigating-an-old-word-stevedore-34860164.aspx

Subject:  investigating an old word -- stevedore Date:  6/23/2021  9:56 PM
Author:  alstroemeria Number:  138424 of 139643

The word stevedore originated in Portugal or Spain, and entered the English language through its use by sailors. It started as a phonetic spelling of estivador (Portuguese) or estibador (Spanish), meaning a man who loads ships and stows cargo, which was the original meaning of stevedore (though there is a secondary meaning of "a man who stuffs" in Spanish); compare Latin stipare meaning to stuff, as in to fill with stuffing.

In the United Kingdom, people who load and unload ships are usually called dockers, in Australia they are called dockers or wharfies, while in the United States and Canada the term longshoreman, derived from man-along-the-shore, is used. Before extensive use of container ships and shore-based handling machinery in the United States, longshoremen referred exclusively to the dockworkers, while stevedores, in a separate trade union, worked on the ships, operating ship's cranes and moving cargo.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevedore
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