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While writing my book I got out of shape and did not like it. Determined to get back into shape, I hired a trainer almost four years ago. Later, at my spin instructor's suggestion, I entered a triathlon. The triathlon was a blast, and I have competed in another five since. You can read more about my experience in this free column at TheStreet.com.
http://www.thestreet.com/_tscsubnav/tsc/landingpages/goodlife/index.html

So is there a link between exercising and portfolio management?

Yes, because in each case we are trying to optimize a scare resource: time (exercise) and money (portfolio).

Mapping out workouts days and weeks in advance and then sticking to it has improved my investment results. Plus, an hour bike ride or 30 minutes of running up hills is a great stress-reducer. In fact, I am going out for a run through the New England woods in a few minutes.



Hewitt

p.s., If you decide that a triathlon is for you, send me a note and I will send you a blank spreadsheet that I use to plan my workouts. Maybe this template will help you, too.


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hey hewitt,

cool post. i started running almost 4 years ago. All it takes is a slow jog, 3 or 4 times a week for 40 minutes, and life will change for you.

I will be running my 3rd marathon in 2 weeks in Chicago. I have yet to break 4 hours, hoping, but not expecting to do that on the 22nd. I will be tapering starting tomorrow in Jamaica :-)

running in the woods in the northeast now is awesome. I run the trails of the Watchung mountains in NJ. I live a block away from them. Sunday i will be running in negril.

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Just curious....did you guys have any kind of cardiac evaluation, like a stress test, before engaging in your activities?......Good idea? No?..........Missash, retired physician
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BGB -

Thanks and have a great run in Chicago. I have three routes near my house that are through the woods, which I much prefer to asphalt (easier on my knees.)

Speaking of the Garden State, ever seen these two fellows during any of your runs? http://www.hbo.com/sopranos/episode/season3/episode37.shtml

Enjoy the reggae.



Hewitt

p.s., One of these days you see the light and take up swimming and biking :)
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Doc Missah -

I did have a stress test and it excellent advice.



Hewitt
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I too am taking on a New Challenge. I started training, yesterday, to run the Pasadena marathon in November. I've never run farther than 3 miles in my life. I haven't run a full mile in the last 10 years. I'm being proactive and telling as many people as I can, burning my bridges, to ensure I don't leave myself an "easy out". This post is part of the process.

I'm 41 and this the first of many new challenges that I will be taking on in my life. Positive challenges. In sum they will make me a much better investor, business man, husband, father, and person. Yeah, its touchy-feely, but it is what it is.
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Buff -

I'm on staff at Huntington Memorial Hospital so if you need an IV at the end of the race I can help you out.

I used to run along Arroyo Gulch. There are some good trails although you have to share with the occasional horse and the result of horses being there. And the gnats are nasty at twilight.

You can also run around the Rose Bowl. Cal Tech has a track that is accessible for your speed work out (mile repeats in September and half miles in October). While one must obviously put in miles to successfully marathon a common error for long distance runners in the "lay" community is to ignore the benefits that having a top end can provide.

After age 40, I found the roads really tough on my knees, so I had to stick to grass or trail running. Or the treadmill at the gym. If the right person is in front of you, it can be less tedious.

My running bonafides are in my profile.

Rog
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Rog,

Yeah, I've walked the Arroyo with my family many times. I live in the San Rafeal area so we've circled the Rose Bowl many times as well.

Hey, I'm gonna give an absolutely shameless plug for my buddies new restraunt right across the street from you. Try out Porta Via if you haven't, Vic and John have a great thing going.
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Single best piece of advice I can give... and you may already be way past this in your knowledge, but this is huge in my mind... buy the right shoes for the way your foot strikes the pavement (a store that specializes specifically in running is worth the visit to help you figure this out), and replace them often... I say every 3-400 miles, but if you want to stretch it out, keep them a little longer and use them for your shorter runs and you can put maybe 500 miles on them max. Your joints will be the ultimate judge of how long you can keep using them. Perhaps some have a more robust physiology than I, but this simple step makes a world of difference in my opinion, and will prevent a multitude of overuse-injury setbacks.

Good luck.
kevin
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Kevin,

Thanks for the advice. I did go to a running store and had them check out my walk to help pick out the best shoes. I was wondering about the milage, that advice is very helpful.
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this is really getting off the subject of IETC but maybe I can find some cliche to wrap it all up...

socks: get good ones

Shoes: put on your good socks and try out the shoes in the store by running with both shoes on. If the shoes feel good, they are right for you. Now.… buy two different pairs and alternate on runs. In this manner, your joints will roll in a slightly different manner and you will avoid repetitive motion injuries. There is a mountain running racer who works at the Arcadia REI who I think is quite knowledgeable about shoes - can't remember his name unfortunately.

When I was putting in 100 miles a week in college, we would change shoes every 3 months, but that was with two pairs of shoes. Certainly, it doesn't hurt to change more frequently.

Also: do the ankle roll thing before each run. Motrin. Don't increase mileage too rapidly. I'm serious when I say that I would start out with a mile or two daily for a week, then 2 miles a day for a week etc. Take the day off after your long run (which should increase only by a mile a week).

Rog
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1. Get a complete physical. This includes your heart. Joggers over 40 suffer heart attacks; e.g., Jim Fixx, author of "The Complete Book of Running."

2. Ice your knees for 20 minutes after you run to reduce inflammation. Long-term, ice beats Advil.

Like Rog, I have found running tough on my knees. Last summer I felt extreme pain after running 12 miles, and on Christmas Day I felt pain after 5 miles.

For the past month a chiropractor has done Active Release http://www.activerelease.com/ on my knees to get the cells under my knee-caps to point in a north-south direction. Now these cells point in random directions, he says. For the past few weeks I ran 1 mile, three times a week. Now I am at two miles. My chiropractor wants me to gradually add miles and then stop if I feel pain.

3. How do ordinary people train to run a marathon? This link from PBS http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/marathon/calendar.html is helpful. One of the "ordinary" people from the hour-long special is Jonathan Bush, CEO of Athena Health (ATHN) and George Bush's cousin. Another aspiring marathoner is Steve DeOssie, who was a long-snapper on the 1990 Super Bowl Champs New York Giants. DeOssie's son Zak was on the Giants' team that upset the 18-0 Patriots in last week's Superbowl.

4. Good luck!



Hewitt
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LOL, the great thing about runners is that they offer unsollicited advice (just look at this thread, don't see anybody asking "does anybody have any advice for me").

Sooo, since nobody asked: 1. lifting your feet after a long run (putting your feet/legs on the couch while laying on the carpet), which makes it easier to get your legs' old blood back to the heart (gravity) and flush new blood back to your legs (when you stand up afterwards).

2. Men: putting bandaids on your nipples before a long run (if you want to avoid your sweat-soaked t-shirt's "friction costs")

Maarten
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What troubles me the most is that I have to have these sorts of conversations at all. Long gone are the days where I'd just throw on an old pair of sneakers and go for a long run. Now I need to have the correct shoes, factor in rest days, hope the brace that helps keep the tendonitis from flaring up in my knee too badly isn't still sweaty and wet... I'm still pretty active, but it seems I'm nursing one injury or another 100% of the time these days, and I'm only 35. Egad, this not being young thing is a drag.
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"I started training, yesterday, to run the Pasadena marathon in November. I've never run farther than 3 miles in my life. I haven't run a full mile in the last 10 years. I'm being proactive and telling as many people as I can, burning my bridges, to ensure I don't leave myself an "easy out". This post is part of the process."

So how's the training going? Are you still running in November? Any lessons you care to pass on after 8 months? I'm considering signing up for my first marathon in June. I used to knock out 50+ miles a week without giving it a second thought, but in my advanced age and susceptibility to nagging injury it seems like a fairly daunting task at the moment. Any lessons or words of encouragement?
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