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Last month my boss required that I start coming into work a half hour earlier. Due to traffic and my general difficulty getting up in the morning, it has resulted in my waking up 90 minutes earlier, and testing my fasting sugar about an hour earlier. The difference is amazing. I averaged 120-135 before the change, and now 140-155 when testing an hour earlier. What ticks me off is that it took me 2 years to get control of my morning sugar level and the boss seems completely oblivious to the impact it has on my health.

In addition to the higher testing levels (or maybe as a consequence), I have been more fatigued throughout the day, had chronic back pain and headaches. I also went through a 3 day period of gastro-intestinal distress (use your imagination), and still have a frequent gas & urination problem (I will stop being gross now). Oh, and my weight has jumpt a few pounds (was under 145, now around 146-7. Not a biggie, but being obsessive about these things, I hate when something does not go right.

To the point, has anyone ever had to deal with a situation imposed on them that forced a health-related change in lifestyle?
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Hi Fuskie!!!

I did a quick search, but didn't come up with much. However, if you believe that your condition will worsen because of your work schedule and/or duties, you might fall under the Americans With Disabilities Act. You might discuss it with your doctor.
I sorta had the same problem. I could be scheduled at 4am or 1pm which didn't help me take the meds consistently at the same time or I would forget entirely. When I had the chance, I got out of that department.

Good luck

Apathy4All
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I did a quick search, but didn't come up with much. However, if you believe that your condition will worsen because of your work schedule and/or duties, you might fall under the Americans With Disabilities Act. You might discuss it with your doctor.

Given that I am not on meds yet, I do not think this would work. I do not think the higher levels are because of the change - I think it is just a reminder of the disease - inability to control morning sugars. The observation is that in one hour the levels come down enough reach my target range.

The rest of it probably comes from the stress of dealing with the higher levels earlier in the morning. Everyone tells me that I should find a way to deal with stress, but what is wrong with trying to address the source of it in the first place? I will be seeing the doctor in July, and will be interested to see how my long term levels come out.

We all know that establishing a consistent routine is key to managing diabetes, whether you are on medication, insulin injections, or diet and exercise. By goal with the latter are to avoid the first two for as long as possible. I have to put my health first, but can't lose my job either.

First step of relieving stress is to vent. That is (in part) why I created this board. To vent to sympathetic ears, get a kick in the ass when necessary, and do the same for the rest of y'all. :-)
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My DW has seen her blood sugars change significantly in the space of two to three hours. Somewhat a function of what is eaten and activities as well as the medication (or injections since my DM had the same disease and eventually had to go the injection route).

I still remember my DM nearly losing my DM. Her's went from the 120 range at 5PM to about 40 at 5:45PM - she responded to questions but if you knew her you could tell something was not right mentally. A rather frightening situation.

My DW is on meds and sees variation within a two to three hour period from 140 or so down to 60.

We've both noticed that we sometimes get "woozie" at levels you would not normally expect.

Course, folks who know me are only surprised when I'm not woozie.

Good luck getting the situation under control.

Howie52,
woozie since Hector was a pup.

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Thanks. Fortunately for me I seem to only have the problem of levels going up. Can not remember last time I was below 90 even after fasting the whole day. But I had a co-worker who had a hypoglycemic shock and it was scary. In my situation, it is all fasting tests in the morning rather than reaction to meals. I guess I could just start testing in the evenings when I get home and not concern myself with the morning levels. One way to deal with a problem is to look around it. :-)
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Check what your eating in the evenings. Starches and such can impact levels over a long haul. Also, some of the "sugary" vegetables - carrots, beets, and such.

Have you talked to a nutrionist(sp)(or read up on the subject)?

Again, good luck.
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Have you talked to a nutrionist(sp)(or read up on the subject)?

When first diagnosed a few years ago, but at $60 a visit I was not going to keep it up. I can read the materials just as well. I generally do not eat after 9pm, and all my meals are about 4 exchanges. I try to limit my carb intake to 60g per meal, no earlier than 3 hours since the last one. If I eat 45g (3 exchanges), I might take a 30g (2 exchange) snack.

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I guess I could just start testing in the evenings when I get home and not concern myself with the morning levels. One way to deal with a problem is to look around it. :-)

I wanted to comment on this, because I have a similar problem. My blood sugar is well controlled according to hemoglobin A1C tests. This is a test that measures your average blood sugar level over the last three or four weeks. I have high blood sugar in the mornings upon awakening. I was told that some type II diabetics exhibit this behavior and it is usually caused by a rise in adrenaline a couple of hours before waking. It may be that now that you are getting up earlier you are hitting a higher point in that adrenaline caused rise. I once set my alarm an hour earlier than usual and took my blood sugar and found it higher than it is upon my usual awakening time.

It would be good to discuss this with a doctor or other knowledgeable person. It would also be good to get a hemoglobin A1C test to see where you are on average.

One suggestion I might make is to take your blood sugar hourly while you are awake for a couple of days, noting particullarly what it is just before meals, an hour after, two hours after, etc. and also noting when and how much you exercise. I realize that this can be expensive for all those test strips but it will give you a good idea of how YOUR body works.

Ted (glad to see this board1)
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