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According to British Army regulations, a trained soldier should be able to fire his musket fifteen times in three minutes and forty-five seconds. Usually they were simply pointing and firing, not really aiming.

I try really hard to have my motley portfolio increase in value by .2% per trading day. It doesn't sound like much, but means about a 50% return per annum (200 days with compounding). Unfortunately, I don't generally achieve those results.

That said, since the beginning of the year, not even a full quarter, I've been pumping out an average rate far higher than that. It sounds pretty cook until you ponder the regressing to the man thing.

I've started reaping profits and struggling with my own greed. I figure, despite the pain, it's better to pay taxes than take tax losses.

While I am continuing to enjoy this market, I also know that it is impossible to keep up this run rate indefinitely.

Yes, I know it's different this time, but the last time so many companies which were losing money exploded in price this fast, the ended up naming it the dot-com thing.

Jeff
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Jeff,

Remember two things if you are following Saul.

Most importantly; these are Nine and Half week romances, not marriages.

Second, Saul has a time machine.

Cheers
Qazulight
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Usually they were simply pointing and firing, not really aiming.

"Aiming" was pretty pointless with a Brown Bess anyway. I watched a guy dressed up as a trapper showing off with his Brown Bess one day. Premeasured paper cartridges and no wads speeded things up quite a bit: pour in the powder, tap the butt on the ground to compress it, pour a little in the pan, pull the hammer back, point in a harmless direction and pull the trigger.

I've started reaping profits and struggling with my own greed. I figure, despite the pain, it's better to pay taxes than take tax losses.

My priorities are different. Cap gains, or losses, don't matter all that much, as long as the company is sound enough to keep paying the dividend. As long as I spend at my current rate, considerably less than my income from SS and divis, I'm SFL.

Steve
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Rapid fire by matchlock guns was an important factor in defeating Ottoman charges and attacks, breaking them up and killing off large numbers of attackers before they could get close enough for deadly Ottoman hand to hand combat.

I would suspect that the musketeers were on top of a wall, or behind ranks of pikes, because a matchlock is a pretty fiddly bit of kit. Pouring powder into the pan, with the match in place on the serpentine, is an invitation for the entire thing to ignite in your face. The drill was to remove the match from the serpentine, fill the pan, blow on the end of the match to get it good and hot, then remount the match on the serpentine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KTS8PQ06Qo

Steve
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<<I would suspect that the musketeers were on top of a wall, or behind ranks of pikes, because a matchlock is a pretty fiddly bit of kit. >>


Good guess:


"The situation was desperate. If the Ottomans gained a toe hold at the top of the cavernous gap [blown in the wall by mines and cannon fire] in the wall they would be impossible to dislodge. The officers and sergeants quickly rallied their men, setting some to make an improvised redoubt.... while in front stood three files of men standing shoulder to shoulder, who fired down, then turned off to each side to reload and then enter the firing line again. They managed to keep up a near continuous barrage of fire possible only because so many musketeers were at hand. Cheveaux de frise were hurriedly assembled and pushed to the edge of the breach, creating an emergency field fortification. Some were also pushed down into the breach ; several Turks were impaled on the spear points as they tried to scramble over them."

"The Enemy at the Gate," Andrew Wheatcroft c. 2008


A description of how narrowly Christian Europe managed to survive.

In the end the siege of Vienna was relieved by the last minute arrival of a Polish army.

But it was a very narrow thing, as was the Battle of Tours and the naval battle of Lepanto. It's a wonder that a Christian Europe survived long enough to thrive.

This is the heritage we are throwing away today.


Seattle Pioneer
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Usually they were simply pointing and firing, not really aiming.

"Aiming" was pretty pointless with a Brown Bess anyway.


Basically a musket is a smoothbore weapon much like a 12 gauge shotgun.[1] ...

...

The best target rifle in the world is not accurate if it has poor sights. The Brown Bess, Charleville and other muskets of the period have no sights at all. The Brown Bess does have a bayonet lug to secure the bayonet. The bayonet lug is not an ideal sight but it is on the top of the barrel; so we will consider that a front sight.

The musket itself is not accurate for a variety of reasons.
...
These, of course, would be the figures if the musket could be properly aimed with sights – which as we have seen it is impossible as it has no sights.

...

Today we think of the infantryman using his rifle, and in a worst case scenario, falling back on his bayonet as a last resort. However, in the 18th century the musket was used to pave the way for the use of the bayonet. It was the bayonet that was the real primary weapon. As it has been said, the musket is a good handle for the bayonet. There’s a lot of truth to that statement.

...

More at:
https://allthingsliberty.com/2013/07/the-inaccuracy-of-muske...
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That second siege of Vienna ( the first was in 1529)...

Some interesting cross currents in that period. For example

Siege of Nice
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Nice
The Siege of Nice occurred in 1543 and was part of the Italian War of 1542–46 in which Francis I and Suleiman the Magnificent collaborated in a Franco-Ottoman alliance against the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, and Henry VIII of England....In the Mediterranean, active naval collaboration took place between France and the Ottoman Empire to fight against Spanish forces....

DB2
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This is the heritage we are throwing away today.
__________________________________________________

I didn't realize that you lived in Europe and therefore would be included in the "we" who were throwing away your heritage. Another way to look at it is that the typical European originated American left wherever they lived in europe because they had more problems there than the alternative of crossing the pond. So which part of that culture are you blaming them for "throwing away" when they take in immigrants (and what part of American heritage" might have been changed when your ancestors were accepted here?

Jeff
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Another interesting reading project is to polish off the Baroque Cycle trilogy by Neal Stephenson which covers the period of time between the Siege of Vienna and the early 18th Century (and brought history as well as the genesis of European finance alive in a way that school never did)


https://www.amazon.com/Quicksilver-Baroque-Cycle-Vol-1/dp/03...

https://www.amazon.com/Confusion-Baroque-Cycle-Vol/dp/006052...

https://www.amazon.com/System-World-Baroque-Cycle-Vol/dp/006...

Jeff
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<<I didn't realize that you lived in Europe and therefore would be included in the "we" who were throwing away your heritage. Another way to look at it is that the typical European originated American left wherever they lived in europe because they had more problems there than the alternative of crossing the pond. So which part of that culture are you blaming them for "throwing away" when they take in immigrants (and what part of American heritage" might have been changed when your ancestors were accepted here?

Jeff>>


Asians and others got tired of being colonized by Europeans, and Europeans and Americans are equally entitled not to be colonized by the third world.


We had different policies last year or a hundred years ago? So what? We are always entitled to change them.



Seattle Pioneer
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I think that's sorta an oversimplification. We are now watching Brexit unfold which is as much about the influx of Eastern Europeans into England as anything else. Yes, I know they are only "Eastern" Europeans, not the real thing, but it doesn't touch on the Anglo-Saxons crossing the North Sea from Germany to push out the Welsh, Picts and Scots, or the Danes and Swedes pushing them around (not to mention their cousins from Normandy. Of course, speaking of France, Dunkirk is in Flanders where they are supposed to speak Flemish which sort of counter balances that the relatively new rebirth of P{oland now includes Prusia - the center of Germany.

This sort of thing has been going on since men first left Africa. Syracuse, the center of Greek mathematics during the time of Archimedes is in Sicily (accounting for why various Mediterranean flat breads are called pita, pidde, pizza). Speaking of the Greeks, they invaded Asia Minor, where the Romans established the Eastern Empire with Constantine elevating a small sect to prominence so he could confiscate the wealth of the existing polytheistic religion. That "Greek" empire fell in 1453 to the Turks (who were pushed westward by the Mongols.

And it goes on and on stretching back a couple of hundred thousand years. Everyone resents foreigners moving into their land, but the texture of human history is described by the mobility of our species. Interestingly, humans turn out to be, well human. Once you get past the fact that someone's background may be different than the one you grew up in, in the same way as all of our DNA in greater than 98% identical, people from other countries are pretty much all the same.

I've never taken a pole, but I suspect that my closest hundred neighbors come from more than twenty countries - and the majority are recent immigrants. As far as I'm concerned, this means that I can find a larger variety of restaurant, food in the local markets and topics of conversation than I otherwise would. Do I resent them? Of course not - why would I. If my taxes become unbearable because of an increased incremental expense, I would simply move elsewhere.

I figure, I grew up in an environment where I was exposed to foreigners from all sorts of (as you call them) third world countries, and competed with them in an environment which brought us together, rather than creating enmity. I can honestly say that my life would be far less interesting if everyone was like me, only dumber than it is where most I know are very different and many my intellectually leave me in the dust.

Building a wall (physical or metaphorical) not only keeps others out, but keep information out as well. Bearing in mind that the vast majority of the founders of our IT industry are first or second generation Americans - many from the "third world", we would be a far lesser (rather than aspiring to be great "again") country if they had been excluded.

It has been a long time since Europe had that advantage. Check back with them in a generation and see if in those countries who allow freedom of advancement, a similar phenomenon takes place.

Jeff
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Reminds me of the youtube video:
history of the entire world, i guess
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuCn8ux2gbs
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Enjoying this post. Balloon Day!

BB
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