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Sounds like some of our (previously unidentified) best and brightest are on the case big-time now:

Google, Red Hat, Oracle and other companies are contributing dozens of computer engineers and programmers to help the Obama administration fix the U.S. health-insurance exchange website. Among those assisting are Michael Dickerson, a site reliability engineer on leave from Google, and Greg Gershman, the innovation director for smartphone application maker Mobomo [....] "There are dozens of software engineers, developers, designers and analysts, who are methodically working around the clock on performance and functionality of healthcare.gov," wrote Julie Bataille, a spokeswoman for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services...

Hopefully the problems will soon end, and the Loonies won't be rejoicing about the inability of the uninsured to have some semblance of a healthcare safety net.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/google-oracle-workers-enlisted...
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Help coming from the "evil" private sector what a frikking irony!
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Help coming from the "evil" private sector what a frikking irony!

The private sector screwed it up in the first place. Oh, you do NOT believe in facts OR reality.
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The private sector screwed it up in the first place. Oh, you do NOT believe in facts OR reality.
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The private sector used code 3 decades old?
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"The private sector screwed it up in the first place. "

Or the political hacks managing the project f*cked it up.
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The private sector used code 3 decades old?

Guess how old the code was before the Y2k fixes went into effect....
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Guess how old the code was before the Y2k fixes went into effect....
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Did they use the same old code to fix it?
Why would one use old code to build something "new"?
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Did they use the same old code to fix it?
Why would one use old code to build something "new"?


They were required to use the same programming language because that is what worked. The change was in looking at how the date info was read and stored.

The alternative was being required to rewrite the entire system on new hardware and new software. Guess how long it would take to get the new hardware, new software written and verified--and how much time AND money it would take to get from the start to the completed project?

My bank has been working on upgrading its software--and portions of it have been offline/unusable for six months. It is supposed to "go live" beginning Nov 5. But it will "be down" Nov 1-4. Plus, a lot of the old historic info will NOT be available after the upgrade. A customer can see statements going back 18 months--and that is all. A customer can see the front and back of checks cashed (i.e. ones written to pay bills) for the past two months--and that is all. After that, the info is just on the statement. The info on the check--to whom it was issued--is NOT on the statement. That is a major cost the bank does NOT incur. But one also can NOT print it to prove it was paid in (say) six months--because there is NO NAME SHOWN of to whom the check was written. Fee time....
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