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Also from the Power Mag article:
https://www.powermag.com/shakeup-for-720-mw-nuclear-smr-proj...

But as Webb told POWER in an email late on Wednesday night, despite the recent withdrawals, UAMPS remains committed to the project. “With 29 members going forward, as of today, the project remains totally viable. Twenty nine participants is a very high participation rate for any UAMPS project,” he said.

He emphasized: “The project is not dependent on the decisions of just a few members. The vast majority of participants want to move into the next phase. The number of participants, the individual subscription numbers and the total subscription level are not particularly relevant at this point in the project. It was always anticipated that the UAMPS member allocations would constitute a minority share of the total project. Other utilities will need to join the project or execute power purchase agreements to reach the full subscription level.”

For now it means UAMPS will continue to pursue plans to move the project into the next phase, which will involve preparing the application to the NRC to construct and operate the plant. “It will also involve working with many utilities that have expressed interest in the project to ensure that the project will be fully subscribed before construction begins,” Webb said.

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Perhaps the project isn't as doomed as some people might want you to believe.

One of the advantages of the NuScale design, and for SMRs in general, is each reactor module is relatively small. For NuScale, each reactor plant can generate 50 MWe, and there are plans to apply for a licensing change to uprate the design to 60 MWe. Regardless, there are several more steps along the way, among them obtaining the combined construction and operating license(s), before the participating partners are fully committed to funding the project.

There are 12 reactor modules planned for the UAMPS project in Idaho. So, if they don't have the funds to build all 12 modules, they might settle for an initial 6 or 9 modules. Then, when the first phase is complete and making electricity, it should be easier to obtain the rest of the funding to complete all 12 units.

- Pete
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