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The Renaissance did follow the Black Death pandemic, but not immediately.

David Brooks' hopeful article sees signs of an American business Renaissance forming already.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/17/opinion/covid-economic-bo...


The American Renaissance Has Begun
by David Brooks, The New York Times, June 17, 2021

...

After decades of slowing entrepreneurial dynamism, 4.4 million new businesses were started in 2020, by far a modern record. A report from Udemy, an online course provider, says that 38 percent of workers took some additional training during 2020, up from only 14 percent in 2019.

After decades in which consumption took preference over savings, Americans socked away trillions of dollars in 2020, reducing their debt burdens to lows not seen since 1980 and putting themselves in a position to spend lavishly as things open up....

The economy has already taken off. Global economic growth is expected to be north of 6 percent this year, and strong growth is expected to last at least through 2022.....“It’s the best job market I’ve seen in 25 years. We have 50 percent more openings now than we did pre-Covid.” Investors are pouring money into new ventures. During the first quarter of this year U.S. start-ups raised $69 billion, 41 percent more than the previous record, set in 2018....
[end quote]

The article also mentions many work-life balance changes that may or may not last.

The thesis of the article is that the disruption caused by Covid could lead to long-term positive economic and social changes.

Wendy
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The thesis of the article is that the disruption caused by Covid could lead to long-term positive economic and social changes.

</snip>


Absolutely. The "job creators" are getting a lot of push-back on "return to the office" and ending "work from home".

The highest quality workers with other options (including retirement) are telling the boss to pound salt. <LOL>

intercst
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Future looks a lot like the past: more concentration of wealth and power.

Beaumont and Spectrum Health plan to merge, forming Michigan's biggest health system

Two Goliaths in Michigan health care — Beaumont Health and Spectrum Health — announced Thursday they've signed a letter of intent to unite, forming a new, massive health system that would employ 64,000 people and operate 22 hospitals spanning the state.

The deal is to include Priority Health, an insurance plan that enrolls 1.2 million people under the Spectrum Health umbrella and claims to be the fastest growing and second largest in Michigan.


https://www.freep.com/story/news/health/2021/06/17/beaumont-...

Being vertically integrated with their own health insurance company is a nice touch. I'm sure on-one would ever suggest the insurance company and the hospital company conspire to roger the patients./sarcasm

Clearly, competition is for "socialists". Concentration is the "free market" way to go.

Steve
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Being vertically integrated with their own health insurance company is a nice touch.

The patients' lawyers will love it. Why? Easy. The insurance company can NOT say "they did not know" when the company is *owned* by the health care provider. The "duty to disclose" omitted/missing relevant coverage information by the insurance company AND the health care provider network will make those cases a snap win for the patients in virtually any court.
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The thesis of the article is that the disruption caused by Covid could lead to long-term positive economic and social changes.

I certainly hope that the work-from-home options are kept in place for those who wish to fulfill their jobs remotely. It is the single best way to relieve the affordable housing shortage in areas like San Francisco, New York, and Washington, D.C.

There are places all over the country (many of them small towns and rural areas) where housing is affordable on a modest income. If online work can provide a modest income sufficient to buy a home in an out-of-the-way area, technology will truly have served one of its primary purposes of improving people's quality of life.
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I certainly hope that the work-from-home options are kept in place for those who wish to fulfill their jobs remotely.

Not if USian "JCs" have anything to say about it.

CEOs are getting sick of staff working from home

Enthusiasm for a return to the office has been most pronounced in the US banking sector, where CEOs have been vocal about wanting to bring people back. Goldman Sachs (GS) chief executive David Solomon earlier this year called working from home an "aberration" and has ordered staff back in. JPMorgan (JPM) has told the majority of staff to return by September. Morgan Stanley (MS) boss James Gorman made headlines this week when he said: "If you can go into a restaurant in New York City, you can come into the office and we want you in the office."

The push to get people back in the office comes as bosses worry about the inefficiency of remote working. UBS' senior leader survey found 88% think productivity suffers when people work from home.


https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/ubs-ceo-survey-work-from-h...

Does the "JC" care about the inefficiency of you spending hours every week commuting? Nope.

Does the "JC" care about what sort of housing you can afford in the city? Not one whit.

Does the "JC" care about the cost and inconvenience of child care? Not his problem.

"JC" says "Your job is where I say it it. Show up where I tell you to show up, or you are a voluntary quit"

Steve
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I certainly hope that the work-from-home options are kept in place for those who wish to fulfill their jobs remotely. It is the single best way to relieve the affordable housing shortage in areas like San Francisco, New York, and Washington, D.C.

Most of the tech companies are going to a hybrid system, where you work in the office 2-3 days a week and remote the rest of the time. Amazon was planning on full time office, but they caved and went hybrid. Google went hybrid, but then caved and went more hybrid.
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Turn the gorgeous Appalachians into work from home homeland, radically shifting everything about America from Georgia north into Pennsylvania.


David fb
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Turn the gorgeous Appalachians into work from home homeland,...

Need decent internet first.

IP
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Same thing with the White Mountains; hunting, fishing, skiing and hiking all within a couple of hours drive from the ocean. This area has some crystal clear streams and rivers with some incredible wild trout fishing. You only want to watch for bears and huge moose. I have encountered both and was more afraid of the moose as they have no fear.

The only draw back IS lousy internet service. While this area had TV stations delivered by wire back in the 60's as cities like Berlin and Gorham are surrounded by mountains, originally you could only get 4 channels. There were 3 English and one French Canadian.

The situation still has not changed much in the woodland countryside.
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Need decent internet first.

Piece on the news sometime last week, about a small town/rural county that took it upon itself to build out a broadband network for all it's residents as a county utility. The report noted that, in several states, that is illegal, because the coms companies had the states pass laws prohibiting broadband being offered as a city or county utility. Of course, the "job creators" will continue to cherry pick the most profitable places to offer the service.

Steve
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Affordable internet and health insurance not tied to employment, the latter problem being particularly solved.
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