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http://www.forbes.com/2008/12/08/towns-ten-economy-forbeslif...

10-Middletown, Ohio
9-Burton, Mich.
8-Grandview, Mo
7-Hamtramck, Mich
6-Spanish Lake, Mo
5-Austintown, Ohio
4- Asheboro, N.C
3-Kokomo, Ind
2- Candler-McAfee, Ga
1-Bensenville, Ill.
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Great news. I've only been to one of the cities on this list, so I can't say much one way or the other. As for Asheboro, NC, it never was much of a place to live or visit. The North Carolina Zoo is just down the road a couple of miles, and that's a nice place to visit, but Asheboro is just a rundown old mill town, with nothing much to show for it. It's the county seat, so the courthouse is the biggest draw in town.
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<< It's the county seat, so the courthouse is the biggest draw in town.
>>


"And white lightnings still the biggest thrill of all?"



We don't smoke marijuana in Muskogee;
B7
We don't take our trips on LSD
B7
We don't burn our draft cards down on Main Street;
E
We like livin' right, and bein' free.


E
I'm proud to be an Oakie from Muskogee,
B7
A place where even squares can have a ball ----
B7
We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
E
And white lightin's still the biggest thril of all

We don't make a party out of lovin';
We like holdin' hands and pitchin' woo;
We don't let our hair grow long and shaggy,
Like the hippies out in San Francisco do.

And I'm proud to be an Oakie from Muskogee,
A place where even squares can have a ball.
We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
And white lightin's still the biggest thril of all.

Leather boots are still in style for mainly footwear;
Beads and roman sandals won't be seen.
Football's still the roughest thing on campus,
And the kids here still respect the college dean.


We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
In Muskogee, Oklahoma, USA.
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Like ResNullius, I've only been to one on the list (Kokomo, IN), but I've been there many times. I'm only 35 miles from it, and it's where I buy all my paper and canned goods for the ice cream store. I guess I should have been buying a new Chrysler every trip instead of things from Gordon's Foods :-)

Forbes had another list recently. I think it was their "most vulnerable" list. My city was #8 on that list. Something scary when your destination points are back and forth most vulnerable and fastest-dying.
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<<Forbes had another list recently. I think it was their "most vulnerable" list. My city was #8 on that list. Something scary when your destination points are back and forth most vulnerable and fastest-dying.
>>

I seem to recall that you were getting nailed on delivery charges by suppliers. Did you start doing the driving to avoid those costs?

How did summer business pan out overall?



Seattle Pioneer
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I seem to recall that you were getting nailed on delivery charges by suppliers. Did you start doing the driving to avoid those costs?

Good memory, SP! The delivery fuel surcharges were from the hard and soft ice cream suppliers only. I started driving to Kokomo to buy toppings, paper goods, and waffle cones when they raised their minimum order to $300 for truck delivery.

<How did summer business pan out overall?>

:-)

It was my best year since I bought out my ex-partner in -03. I was planning on a buttwhipping with gas over $4, groceries going up, and a lot of people nervous. Practically all my costs went up, especially soft mix. I've swallowed most smaller increases, but felt I had to test the concept of "pricing power." I got ready to get some earfuls about it.

Not one blessed word! I guess they expected it. I'm not entering the economic consultant market anytime soon. Some of my "creations" took off, too, I humbly admit.

Banana brownie fudge sundae...yum.
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<<It was my best year since I bought out my ex-partner in -03. I was planning on a buttwhipping with gas over $4, groceries going up, and a lot of people nervous. Practically all my costs went up, especially soft mix. I've swallowed most smaller increases, but felt I had to test the concept of "pricing power." I got ready to get some earfuls about it.

Not one blessed word! I guess they expected it. I'm not entering the economic consultant market anytime soon. Some of my "creations" took off, too, I humbly admit.
>>


Wow --- that is VERY good news! You need to report that over on the self employed Fools board. Always glad to hear about someone who is making the world work for them.


<<Banana brownie fudge sundae...yum.
>>


Now that you mention it, I'm guessing anything is better with a brownie in it!



Merry Christmas,



Seattle Pioneer
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i sure hope the hip-hugger in kokomo in stays open. it is the cultural event center for the male population.

"the hip-hugger saving kokomo one dollar tucked into a g-string at a time."
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I used to travel thru Kokomo on US-31 on a regular basis when I would transport the RVs made in Elkhart. I swear at least half the town is some kind of auto plant. I am not surprised that they are taking it on the chin hard.
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I swear, this whole list is reminding me of how important it is to diversify your economy. And local/state economy dependent on one or two industries takes very real risk of going into local depression at the smallest economic shift.

I think the Texas economy has done a commendable job of moving away from being primarily an oil and gas economy to having one of the more diversified and vibrant economies in the country. And I think it's no surprise why, between that and a relatively friendly tax policy for business, the Texas economy -- while showing signs of weakening with the nation -- is still one of the strongest in the Union.

There was a conscious effort in Texas after the mid-1980s oil bust to grab other industries. Oil is obviously still very important, but it's no longer so dominant that it makes or breaks the economy like the auto industry makes or breaks Michigan. Too much of the rust belt held on to its legacy and refused to admit it was time to move on.

#29
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