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And she had an unexpected health issue, so having someone else pay for insurance is good.

That's our situation too. I am hopeful it will be resolved favorably in a few months.

1poorlady was commenting that we should stop talking about retirement. When we were setting tentative dates a mass they were monitoring changed in size, and I ended up with major surgery. Now recovering reasonably well I wanted to set dates again, and now she is going to have surgery.

The universe is conspiring against us.
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Yeah!

MoneySlob
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That assumes that you have to be 100% in the room, and at some point you might notice danger and your reaction would be to leave the room entirely. In the analogy, you can't be, say, 60% to 70% in the room, and ride out any danger thanks to not being 100% in the room.

To torture the analogy further, you not only need to know when to get 100% out of the room, but later, know when to get back into the room or miss out on the benefits of being in the room. There are still people who left the room five to 15 years ago who are waiting for their Bourne-sense to tell them when it's safe to get back into the room.
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”There are still people who left the room five to 15 years ago who are waiting for their Bourne-sense to tell them when it's safe to Get back into the room”

I cannot help but suspect that this will be the year they decide that this is the year to get back in, driving the market up to the rafters just in time for it to come crashing down.

Gene
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I saw that housing starts in December were at an all time high. From what I see in AZ, it seems very, very high compared to the income around here. As someone nearing retirement, I'd rather miss out on some of the rise, if it means I'll miss out on the eventual fall.
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As someone nearing retirement, I'd rather miss out on some of the rise, if it means I'll miss out on the eventual fall.

Kind of depends when and how much the fall is. Missing the rise from 20,000 to 30,000 to avoid the fall to 25,000 doesn't seem worthwhile.
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I also am playing it close. My stops triggered a few months ago. Turned out to be a whipsaw, but I've only put about half my assets back in (and enjoyed the additional run-up)**. I'm sitting on the other half waiting for the shoe to drop (or a sign that it won't, but I'm still pretty convinced it will).

I would be planning retirement NOW, but additional medical issues came up so that it makes sense to keep employer insurance a bit longer. But barring more unexpected I will pack it in this year.




**Except I can't do a stop on my ESPP, and I need to have income near zero before I divest myself of that. After 26 years I have some really really cheap shares. Huge cap gain (like 50x).
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I'm not sure I understand why one would be terribly concerned about the DJIA tumbling. A 50% drop would return the DJIA to what it was when I retired in 2013.

I saved too much in traditional 401(k) and IRA accounts. I wouldn't mind a 50% decline in taxable RMD income. I could even consider using my "emergency" fund to pick up some bargains.
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MCC: "I'm not sure I understand why one would be terribly concerned about the DJIA tumbling. A 50% drop would return the DJIA to what it was when I retired in 2013."

Not everybody has more than double what they need to retire comfortably?
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Actually, I wouldn't sweat the DJIA tumbling. I don't think I own one thing in that index. S&P500 is another matter! Though it wouldn't be a catastrophe right now because I has a lot of cash available to bargain shop in that event.
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MCCrockett writes,

I'm not sure I understand why one would be terribly concerned about the DJIA tumbling. A 50% drop would return the DJIA to what it was when I retired in 2013.

</snip>


Same here. I've seen two 50%+ portfolio declines in the 25 years I've been retired. (i.e., 2000 and 2008) Just maintain your asset allocation and rebalancing. With time, your retirement portfolio will recover and likely be setting new highs.

intercst
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1poorguy writes,

Actually, I wouldn't sweat the DJIA tumbling. I don't think I own one thing in that index. S&P500 is another matter!

</snip>


The DOW and the S&P 500 are highly correlated. If you get a 50% drop in the DOW, the S&P 500 will do about the same.

intercst
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Probably true.

I do have S&P index funds in my IRA. Mostly I own individual stocks, and they only are on the S&P...well, I do own V which is DJ. And I just checked...DIS is also on the 30. Everything else is on the 500, except ROKU which isn't on anything at this time.

401K is Fido funds, including an international fund.
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But barring more unexpected I will pack it in this year.

Congrats on that. I think we're about the same age. We hit our number and I'd like to pack it in, but the wife doesn't quite trust the whole stock market thing and has a good paying job she enjoys so she's not ready to pull the pin. And she had an unexpected health issue, so having someone else pay for insurance is good. For her part, she told me I could retire anytime I wanted, but I feel like unless we both do it, it wouldn't feel like retirement for me. So we'll soldier on for a bit longer, and hopefully enjoy a higher lifestyle when the time comes.
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"For her part, she told me I could retire anytime I wanted, but I feel like unless we both do it, it wouldn't feel like retirement for me."

We had a similar conversation, but I went ahead and retired 12/31/2019 (a few months before my 63rd birthday) and started walking, hiking, biking, cooking, reading novels and histories....

...and she retired 1/31/2020 so she could have fun too.
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"We had a similar conversation, but I went ahead and retired 12/31/2019 (a few months before my 63rd birthday) and started walking, hiking, biking, cooking, reading novels and histories....

...and she retired 1/31/2020 so she could have fun too. "

*******************************************************************

I am really confused by your tenses.

Seems you are missing a "will" or a "shall" and have an "ed" where no "ed"
should find themselves.

Or perhaps you are reading H.G.Wells and got tangled up in the plot.

Howie52
Beware of Morlocks!!!!
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I suspect it may be a British English v American English thing. I read the text and it made perfect sense to me (a Brit), though I can never get used to having 31 months in a year!
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Oops. I was reading a British murder mystery. I retired 12/31/18 and Ispouse retired 1/31/19. No time machine - brain f@rt.
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And she had an unexpected health issue, so having someone else pay for insurance is good.

That's our situation too. I am hopeful it will be resolved favorably in a few months.

1poorlady was commenting that we should stop talking about retirement. When we were setting tentative dates a mass they were monitoring changed in size, and I ended up with major surgery. Now recovering reasonably well I wanted to set dates again, and now she is going to have surgery.

The universe is conspiring against us.
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