Skip to main content
No. of Recommendations: 2
And the CDC can't control ports (either within the US nor foreign ports). If they don't want cruise ships docking, it's not going to happen. So at most you could sail around in circles for a week and hope your port of departure will allow you back in.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
And the CDC can't control ports (either within the US nor foreign ports). If they don't want cruise ships docking, it's not going to happen. So at most you could sail around in circles for a week and hope your port of departure will allow you back in.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Cruises to no where have been booked in the past.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
My personal opinion is that you would need rocks in your head to think you could safely enjoy a cruise next week.

Jeff


Hopefully, by 2022 when we have a cruise booked, it will be reasonable to cruise.

Lindblad has small ships (less than 200 including crew). It will be interesting to see how well their COVID policies work.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Yes, we have "cruise-next" credits that expire in late 2022. I don't know how they will handle it if it isn't safe by then. Or maybe it will be moot because the certificates will be no good because they cruise lines are out of business. They can't keep bleeding money forever.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
I find it hard to imagine what all the crews, guides are doing in all this lost time...It will be quite a feat for any cruise line to survive all this dead time.. Mothball the fleets and see how it works out. I can't imagine either boarding an airliner, or a cruise ship unless we see some magical, verified, worldwide vaccine.

Locked up in a stateroom is hardly a vacation...

Letting a political hack determine the safety of travelers is so idiotic...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/cdc-says-cruises-set-sai...

The fine print in the order means not yet.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
From Nov. 11, James Walker's travel blog.
Passengers were informed:
"Company officials say masks will not be required to be worn on yacht, thanks to extensive pre-departure testing designed to create negative ‘bubble.’" Wow. Way too many false negatives for this to work. Foolish. Another recipe for a disaster, via @SeaDreamYC #COVID19 #cruise

https://www.cruiselawnews.com/2020/11/articles/disease/covid...

Pretty sure I'd never sign up for a cruise on SeaDream Yacht Club's cruiseline.
Actually, I'm pretty sure cruising is off of my travel planning for years, if not forever.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
can't imagine either boarding an airliner, or a cruise ship unless we see some magical, verified, worldwide vaccine.

A plane is much safer than airports.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Still hoping that the cruise we had booked and was deferred to 2022 will be safe and possible.

Because of my tendency for seasickness, I have always had a love hate relationship with cruising.

I still can't believe that less than a year ago, I was debating on whether or not to take a trip because Typhoid vaccine was strongly recommended. How much has changed this year.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Expensive new cruise ships are ready to sail—with nowhere to go. Royal Caribbean's 596-passenger ultraluxury Silver Moon is the culmination of a $380 million, 20-month project. But she'll have to wait until spring to make her maiden voyage. She's not alone—at least 10 ships have wrapped construction in the pandemic, representing an industry investment of more than $3.84 billion.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-11-17/almost-4-...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 5
I find it interesting that cruise lines are trying to appear as if they are as essential to the US as airlines and hotels. Cruises are purely elective, employ few Americans and recognize most of their profits abroad. Sure travel agents would lose a lot of what's left of their commissions, but web-based sales have put many of them in the buggy-whip category years ago anyway.

Jeff
Print the post Back To Top