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One day before last year’s fatal crash, Lion Air’s Boeing 737 Max 8 was reportedly saved by an off-duty pilot
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/20/lion-air-boeing-737-saved-by...

One day before the deadly crash of a Lion Air plane on Oct. 29 last year, pilots flying that Boeing 737 Max 8 lost control of the aircraft — but they were saved by an off-duty colleague riding in the cockpit, Bloomberg reported on Wednesday.

That off-duty pilot correctly identified the problem the crew was facing and guided them to disable the flight control system in order to save the plane, according to the report, which cited two people familiar with the investigation in Indonesia.

Investigators said the flight control system malfunction that day was identical to what brought down the same aircraft the next day, according to the report. The Boeing plane, operated by a different crew, crashed into Indonesia’s Java Sea, killing all 189 on board.

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Perhaps the fix for the B737 Max is the addition of a 3rd flight crew member well-schooled in "recovery from unusual attitudes, while diagnosing MCAS faults".

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Perhaps the fix for the B737 Max is the addition of a 3rd flight crew member well-schooled in "recovery from unusual attitudes, while diagnosing MCAS faults".

Can't do that. It would raise costs and take money away from the "job creator class". On the other hand, this gives Boeing more ammunition to insist that it is totally innocent because their poorly documented, fault prone and non-redundant system can be turned off by a fast thinking pilot who guesses correctly.

Steve...so....why not turn the bugger off and leave it off? again I ask, why did Boeing install MCAS in the first place?
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Steve asks,

Steve...so....why not turn the bugger off and leave it off? again I ask, why did Boeing install MCAS in the first place?

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To give the B737 Max the same flight characteristics as previous B737 models. If the MAX differed too much from previous models, the FAA was likely to require a new "Type Rating" and additional training for B737 pilots moving up to the MAX.

That need to pay for additional training was exactly the thing Southwest Airlines was trying to avoid.

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