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We recently hit on Edgar Rice Burroughs in a thread, and while I was out at a local bookstore, I picked up a paperback of Michael Moorcock's tribute to Burroughs Kane of Old Mars, all three originals books published in one in 1997 though the originals were written in the late 60s or early 70s. I generally like Moorcock's works (a sort of guilty pleasure thing!)and thought he did an excellent job on these.

Anyone else read them or like Moorcock?

Moonglade (not Moonglum LOL )

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Anyone else read them or like Moorcock?

I've read some graphic novels of the Elric books - and participated in a role-playing game set in that universe, but never actually read anything of his.

One of these days.

-mapletree
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I've read some graphic novels of the Elric books - and participated in a role-playing game set in that universe, but never actually read anything of his.

That's multiverse, of course. <grin>

Despite the rather straight-forward , simplistic sword-and-sorcery genre, the novels are surprisingly complex in the way Moorcock intermingles them with each other, though they are technically a sort of past, present and future of humans and therefore Earth. The Von Bek books are definately Earth, the Corum ones have a celtic flavor though twisted for the original, the Hawkmoon books are a distant future where the country names are recognizable if barely. Worth a read, if you enjoy the genre.

Moonglade
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I always thought Moorcock was sci-fi horror, so I never bothered to read him. Have I been missing out?

Thuvia
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I always thought Moorcock was sci-fi horror, so I never bothered to read him. Have I been missing out?

I'll say. The vast majority of his works are fantasy, sword and sorcery genre and have a few years on them. Others are more of an alternate history, particularely if more recent (i.e., Nazi Europe etc).

In the mid-late 90's, most of his works were republished in books containing 4-6 of his original short books. Hawkmoon was one of the best but since they are all linked with the concept of the Eternal Champion (and his main characters being aspects of that Eternal Champion), I don't think you can loss no matter where you start.

If you like John Carter of Mars, you'll probably like the Kane of Old Mars series. The Elric series is the longest and that hero is more of an anti-hero. Corum is a decidedly Otherworldly hero with those works based in Irish folklore (so it was one of my favorites.)

Enjoy!

Moonglade
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I've never been a fan of Sword and Sorcery, but I'll admit that Moorcock does it better than most. I'm a huge fan of his Sci-Fi series 'Dancers on the Edge of Time'. You'd think that stories about all-powerful eternals who are bored with existance would be uninteresting. MM pulls it off nicely.

I'll have to take a look at the 'Old Mars' series.

l1soul
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Moorcock? Oh, I suppose I only have 35 - 40 of them in the house.

Why do you ask?
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I always thought Moorcock was sci-fi horror, so I never bothered to read him. Have I been missing out?

I was on a Moorcock kick a long time ago, and I purchased a lot of them - mostly out of print collectibles from used book stores.

I got tired of them; a lot of sameness...Elric and Corum and Hawkmoon, all different aspects of the Eternal Champion (a takeoff, I believe, on the Carolingian cycle stuff that has Arthur returning at the time of England's need) wielding a magical sword (a bound demon - the Stealer of Souls). The Eternal Champion is a very bad person to become friends with; when unsheathed, the sword MUST drink a soul, and it doesn't care if the soul is the soul of a friend or a foe. So, when the Champion takes out the sword, someone dies. He loses a lot of friends that way, and not a few lovers.

I like Zelazny's Amber series a lot better. Zelazny died a few years ago, in his '50s...a young man, relatively.
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Moorcock? Oh, I suppose I only have 35 - 40 of them in the house.

Why do you ask?


I'd only recently read the Kane of Old Mars series despite its being reprinted some 7 years ago. And since E.R. Burroughs' John Carter series had been mentioned, I wondered if any had also read these scarce books (at least the original single short novels are scarce) by Moorcock. I've been long intrigued by his Eternal Champion concept and the multiverse.

Moonglade
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I haven't looked at my Moorcocks in a long time. Over the course of moving a few times, they have become scattered. I just took a pass through my books and came up with 24 of them, including an original edition The Sleeping Sorceress. There's more there.

I should have all the Elrics and all the Corums, most of the Hawkmoons, several of the End of Time books, and the Castle Brass series. I also have Behold the Man, and The Fireclown.

I don't have any of the Kane of Old Mars series, although I did read a few of them probably 25 years ago.

Actually, I got into the eternal champion books and, although I had the opportunity to pick up some of the Kane books, I didn't do so since it would have me starting still another series. I elected to complete the Eternal Champion series, and by the time I had, I was ready to move on to other things.
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The Eternal Champion is a very bad person to become friends with; when unsheathed, the sword MUST drink a soul, and it doesn't care if the soul is the soul of a friend or a foe.

I wonder if that's where Brust got his idea for a morganti dagger. I've never read Zelazny so don't know if he also used the concept.

Thuvia
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I've never read Zelazny so don't know if he also used the concept.

Zelazny didn't do that. He actually isn't long on supernatural or mythical creatures - demons, trolls, dragons, what have you. His characters tend to be - let us say - unusual and exist in a universe that is equally unusual.

In the Amber series, for instance, Amber is the one true reality and everything else (including our earth) is a shadow of that reality. His protagonists walk through shadow, encountering many things and situations. From our perspective, they are supernatural in that they can travel among universes, but from their perspective they are merely people. Also, although hard to kill, they are indeed mortal.
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