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Genetic Treasures From the Apple’s Ancestral Home

http://www.leachgarden.org/event/genetic-treasures-of-apples...

Phil Forsline is the recently retired curator of the USDA's Plant Genetics Resources Unit, which is located on the Geneva, NY, campus of Cornell University. Phil will discuss his expeditions to Kazakhstan (the apple's center of genetic diversity), Russia and China to collect wild apple material for conservation, evaluation, and distribution to geneticists and breeders throughout the world. Results of Forsline's work promise many benefits, most importantly disease and insect resistance which could revolutionize the apple industry. If you have read The Botany of Desire by Michael Pollan or viewed the documentary about the book on PBS then you are already familiar with Forsline's work.
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This talk will be given in Portland on the 25th of this month. Phil Forsline is the father of my friend Anna the Audiologist, whom I met at my last job at a digital hearing-aid company in California and who moved to Portland not long after we did, no doubt inspired by my courageous pioneering. If you need help arranging accommodations, let me know.

--fleg

P.S. I can't wait to ask him if he met Borat when he was in Kazakhstan.

P.P.S. The talk will be given at a non-profit botannical garden once run by the volunteer coordinator at the medical clinic at which I currently work. Petite monde, n'est ce pas?
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P.P.S. The talk will be given at a non-profit botannical garden once run by the volunteer coordinator at the medical clinic at which I currently work. Petite monde, n'est ce pas?
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¡Sí My grandfather left all his botany-oriented stuff to Cornell. He was a big name in azaleas.
http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JARS/v23n1/v23n1-skinner...

arrete
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Bought my first batch of Honeycrisp--a patented apple--yesterday at Costco. Ten apples for $14.99 and worth every bite. If you haven't yet tried a Honeycrisp, you're in for a treat, but don't delay...the harvest season for Honeycrisp is short. From Wiki:

Honeycrisp (Malus domestica 'Honeycrisp') is an apple cultivar developed at the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station's Horticultural Research Center at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Designated in 1960 as the MN 1711, and released in 1991, the Honeycrisp, once slated to be discarded, has rapidly become a prized commercial commodity, as its sweetness, firmness, and tartness make it an ideal apple for eating raw. The Honeycrisp also retains its pigment well and boasts a relatively long shelf life when stored in cool, dry conditions.
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Here's another background story about Honeycrisp.

http://www.honeycrispapples.com/about.htm

These apples certainly live up to their trademarked "Explosively Crisp" moniker. "It snaps. The piece of apple almost pops off into your mouth," says University of Minnesota Horticulture Professor Jim Luby, one of the new apple's developmental godfathers. A winning all-purpose apple, the Honeycrisp offers a pleasingly crisp sweet-tart bite, but they are not limited to out-of-hand eating. These apples also star in the kitchen- any recipe in which apples are featured will be improved when using the Honeycrisp.

In the history of the apple industry, the Honeycrisp variety is a "new kid" on the block. Developed by the University of Minnesota from a Macoun and Honeygold cross (the Honeygold itself a cross between the Golden Delicious and Haralson), the new apple variety was introduced in 1991. Luby believes the Honeycrisp to be "the best, most exciting apple we've ever introduced." Weidman wholeheartedly agrees.
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"Bought my first batch of Honeycrisp--a patented apple--yesterday at Costco. Ten apples for $14.99 and worth every bite. If you haven't yet tried a Honeycrisp, you're in for a treat, but don't delay...the harvest season for Honeycrisp is short." - catherine


I bought my first bag of Honeycrisp last year at Sam's Club. I didn't feel they were worth the extra cost over and above what Fuji apples cost. They are good but not as good as what I expected. I like Fuji apples just as well and I find Fuji's on sale for 99 cents/lb quite often. Bought some Fuji apples at ASSI in Atlanta for 99 cents/lb and I'm still eating on them.

Art
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I'll be able to find Honeycrisp much cheaper than what I paid yesterday, but these are "premium"--very large--and the first of the season.

I don't think I've ever eaten a Fuji apple. I'll try 'em.
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"I don't think I've ever eaten a Fuji apple. I'll try 'em." catherine


Also crisp, sweet, and delicious. Maybe not quite as crisp as a honeycrisp but pretty dang good. Fuji are my favorite apple.

Artie
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Also crisp, sweet, and delicious. Maybe not quite as crisp as a honeycrisp but pretty dang good. Fuji are my favorite apple
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I find the Honeycrisp are a little tangier and a little crisper, but most of the year I eat Fuji. I will pay a premium for Honeycrisp but only a small one. Fuji's IMO are really good eatin'
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Bought my first batch of Honeycrisp--a patented apple--yesterday at Costco. Ten apples for $14.99 and worth every bite. If you haven't yet tried a Honeycrisp, you're in for a treat, but don't delay...the harvest season for Honeycrisp is short.
cc

>>>>>>>>

I cheaped out when I went to Costco today and bought the Fuji's for 1.69 a lb....forgot how many there were in the plastic pack. Figured they'd be better than the real cheap Red Delicious, they've been tasting watery lately. Ack! I want sweet apples with a nice crunchy yet soft innards.

LD
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It was 8.99 per package of Fuji's.
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Red Delicious apples are unreliable. You think you're getting some nice ones, then they're all mealy.

I bought some Fuji's yesterday after Art mentioned them. They're nowhere near as crisp and tart as Honeycrisp but they're better than Red Delicious.

They've bred all the taste right out of Red Delicious. The skins are thick and tough, too.
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Red Delicious apples are unreliable. You think you're getting some nice ones, then they're all mealy.

I bought some Fuji's yesterday after Art mentioned them. They're nowhere near as crisp and tart as Honeycrisp but they're better than Red Delicious.

They've bred all the taste right out of Red Delicious. The skins are thick and tough, too.



Red Delicious apples were really good when I was a kid... but nowadays I can't stand them.

For me, Honeycrisp is the best apple, Fuji is second best.
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I bought 10 Fuji's for 8.99 at Costco the other day and have yet to bite into one to see if it's sweet. I will make it a point to do so today and report back on taste. They are pretty big ones which I like, cause ....well just because. :)
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