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Of much greater importance to any message board than endless blather about Zionism is the Plain English Campaign's annual report, which lists the most tired cliches that anyone who strives not to offend his reader must avoid:

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=514&e=7&u=/ap/20040324/ap_on_re_eu/cliches

'At the End of the Day' Tops Cliche List

At the end of the day, it's the most irritating cliche in the English language. So says the Plain English Campaign which said the abused and overused phrase was first in a poll of most annoying cliches.

Second place went to "at this moment in time," and third to the constant use of "like," as if it were a form of punctuation. "With all due respect" came fourth.

"When readers or listeners come across these tired expressions, they start tuning out and completely miss the message — assuming there is one," said Plain English Campaign spokesman John Lister.

"Using these terms in daily business is about as professional as wearing a novelty tie or having a wacky ring-tone on your phone."

Lister said people should follow the 1946 advice of writer George Orwell: "Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print."

...

Other terms that received multiple nominations included: 24/7; absolutely; address the issue; around (in place of about); awesome; ballpark figure; basically; basis ("on a weekly basis" in place of "weekly" and so on); bear with me; between a rock and a hard place; bottom line; crack troops; glass half full (or half empty); I hear what you're saying; in terms of; it's not rocket science; literally; move the goal-posts; ongoing; prioritize; pushing the envelope; singing from the same hymn sheet; the fact of the matter is; thinking outside the box; to be honest/to be honest with you/to be perfectly honest and touch base.


sydsydsyd
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Second place went to "at this moment in time," and third to the constant use of "like," as if it were a form of punctuation. "With all due respect" came fourth.

When I'm around someone who says "at this particular point in time" instead of "now" I'm always tempted to work into the conversation "at this particular point in space" as a substitute for "here." So far I've been too kind to indulge myself.

--fleg
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Is now equal to at this point in time?


Given that in physics, time travel is theoretically possible, are the two terms equivalent?


c
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Is now equal to at this point in time?


Given that in physics, time travel is theoretically possible, are the two terms equivalent?


Kinda like mass and weight. They're interchangeable for all practical purposes at sea level on Earth.

--fleg
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Kinda like mass and weight. They're interchangeable for all practical purposes at sea level on Earth.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Boy, you're gonna carry that mass a long time?

2828
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Ugh- I can't stand the term "24/7."

I also hate when people ask if they can take "sidebar" an issue or take it "off the table."
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Watch out for this one: A cliche in the making is substituting "efforting" for "working on it".

Example:

Q: Do you know why the period from 1815 to 1914 was so peaceful?

A: No, but I'm efforting.

Waymee

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A cliche in the making is substituting "efforting" for "working on it".

I suppose that if Kinko's can turn "office" into a verb, anything is possible "in this day and age."

sydsydsyd
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"Utilize" is another great one. I was told early in my Navy career: "Don't use 'utilize'; utilize 'use'."

jtmitch
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<<A cliche in the making is substituting "efforting" for "working on it".>>

I suppose that if Kinko's can turn "office" into a verb, anything is possible "in this day and age."



Don't you guys know that any noun can be verbed?

- tmeri
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They're interchangeable for all practical purposes at sea level on Earth.

At this point in time I think 'for all practical purposes' is a cliche.
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Interesting link, thanks.

Pet peeve (is that a cliche?):


The habit of placing "If you will..." at the end of numerous sentences. This phrase superficially sounds classy, but in reality just replaces other idiotic phrases such as "ya know", "and stuff", etc.

The phrase is stupid and makes one sound stupid using it. Every time a person resorts to that useless phrase, picture their audience (those that are paying attention to the words) asking themselves (and shouting): "If I will WHAT????????" What am I suppose to do, or say?" It has no meaning and is used as a crutch. It's bad enough that television anchors and their guests use it, but some people even type it, (if you will). :-)

Rant over.
Thanks
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"If you will..." at the end of numerous sentences. This phrase superficially sounds classy, but in reality just replaces other idiotic phrases such as "ya know", "and stuff", etc
------------------------™
"If you will" always sounds pompous to me.

arrete
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think "correct me if I'm wrong" is due for early retirement.

--fleg
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How about the usage of "look". Political pundits use it constantly to make a point.

Not on the same page, 24/7 :)
LuckyDog
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Not on the same page, 24/7 :)
LuckyDog


Having fun in your own sandbox? ;-)

tngirl
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think "correct me if I'm wrong" is due for early retirement.

You're wrong - it's too late for that phrase to take EARLY retirement.
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What I liked best about this list is that the #1 biggie - 'At the End of the Day' must have started after I FIREd. And I quote SP "at this time in space" - heh, heh™. Didn't miss it a bit.

arrete - who hated people telling her they needed something "soonest"
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No tn, I'm thinking outside the box....:)

LuckyDog
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arrete - who hated people telling her they needed something "soonest"

I tell you what, when I hear people say "I tell you what", it really frosts my chaps. I avoid cliches like the plague.

Offering U. Megaton
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I tell you what, when I hear people say "I tell you what", it really frosts my chaps. I avoid cliches like the plague.

My daddy use to say, "I'll tell you what's the truth." I'd reply, "Tell me two while you're at it."

tngirl
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Well put that in your pipe and smoke it!

Yeltsin J. Irremediable
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Well put that in your pipe and smoke it!

I thought it was: "well, put that in your little red wagon and pull it town."

tngirl
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"well, put that in your little red wagon and pull it town."

Some of my pet peeves.

"and stuff" Usage: "We had a lot of fun and stuff."

"I'll talk at you later."

"In no way, shape or form."

When talking about houses, "area". Usage: "It's in the dining room area."

Thrusts U. Seraglios
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"800-pound gorilla"

"It's a mystery wrapped in a riddle inside an enigma."

"Be that as it may..."

"If I had a penny (nickel, dime) for every XXXX, I'd be rich."

"The community came together" usually means a handful of people out of a much larger number who couldn't care less.

"We'll have to agree to disagree" or "respectfully disagree" which really mean "I'm right and you're a moron."

--fleg
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"If I had a penny (nickel, dime) for every XXXX, I'd be rich."

If I had a dollar for every time I heard somebody say, "You're a day late and a dollar short", I would only be a day late.

Krushchev E. Keewatin
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If I hear "Going forward" one more time, I'll puke. Adenovir
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...prioritize...thinking outside the box...

Now you've gone and done it -- you've given me flashbacks to my corporate drone days. <grin>

Another great phrase from "corporatese": interface with. A particularly useful one when you're writing those annual BS reports -- er, I meant those One Page Performance Plans.

One I didn't see mentioned on the OP's list is "hopefully", which always drives me buggy.

I never objected to "I tell you what", though... I always thought it sounded rather folksy...

To be perfectly honest (!), I've never even heard the phrase "singing from the same hymn sheet", although I presume it has basically (!) the same meaning as "on the same page".

I do have one friend who overrelies on the phrase "and stuff" in conversation, interspersed here and there with repeated use of the word "whatchamacallit"... drives me nuts. In my honest opinion (is that another phrase that should be nominated?), I think it makes him come across as rather inarticulate. If I had a penny (or a nickel, or a dime, or a dollar) for every conversation I've had with him where he didn't use those words, I'd be broke...


andrew61
Like, touching base here
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I'm determined to stop using "mound of quivering flesh."

Later I'll work on "And that's my final word on the subject."

I figure "push it out to next week" still has some life in it.

--fleg
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Another great phrase from "corporatese": interface with. A particularly useful one when you're writing those annual BS reports -- er, I meant those One Page Performance Plans.

One I didn't see mentioned on the OP's list is "hopefully", which always drives me buggy.

I never objected to "I tell you what", though... I always thought it sounded rather folksy...

To be perfectly honest (!), I've never even heard the phrase "singing from the same hymn sheet", although I presume it has basically (!) the same meaning as "on the same page".


Several years ago it was: "Get all your ducks in a row."

Currently: "Eat your own dogfood."
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