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I’m retired and 77. I keep about 35% in equities. The problem is that as I implement recommendations of various Fool services (I belong to Boss Mode), I find myself squeezed into the large growth area, or at least growth in general. I’d like to be be more balanced with value etf/stocks, etc but it is hard to do that and also follow Fool services which tend to focus so much on growth. I’m guessing that others have the same practical problem. Any suggestions on this issue?
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Lower your overall allocation to growth and buy Berkshire or a value tilt ETF. You have no reason to feel required to follow the Fool's recommendations blindly if it does not fit for you.


Jk
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The problem is that as I implement recommendations of various Fool services ...


There's your problem right there.



I find myself squeezed into the large growth area, or at least growth in general. I’d like to be be more balanced with value etf/stocks, etc but it is hard to do that and also follow Fool services

Yup, I definitely think I see your problem.


I’m guessing that others have the same practical problem.

I believe your guess would be ... wrong.


Any suggestions on this issue?

Maybe for one, stop following (and paying for) services that make recommendations for areas you don't want to be in.

My standard suggestion for people who don't want to do it on their own is to just put their money into one of the Vanguard Life Strategy Funds.


-aside- 35% in equities? Is that all? Lots of people here are 80%+ equities.
If you go to site like https://www.early-retirement.org/forums/ and visit boards like "Financial Independence & Early Retirement" (F.I.R.E.) you'll find lots and lots of people at 95%+ equities.
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The Motley Fool was started be an alternative to the "pay some anonymous person to suggest stocks" model. I knew that over the years they started adding some paid advice subscription service, but I stopped reading anything but message boards more than 10 years ago.
Every time I log in it nags at me that I must have forgotten to subscribe to a Fool service.

So anyway, I've never heard of Boss Mode (outside of the context of computer games) so I went to the main TMF page and clicked to look at the services offered.

GOOD LORD!!!!!
I counted more than 30 subscription service they are selling. I bet that between them all, just about every stock in the Russell 3000 is recommended at least once.

Why someone would pay $4,999 a year for Boss Mode is beyond me. For that price, it should come with a nubile redhead. Or pair of redheads.
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First thing I suggest you do is stop all investment (and reinvestment) into your current equities. This is not say they are bad - it is just a drop dead simple way to make the move you said you wanted. The second thing you do is make all future investments in what you want.

If you want to keep 35% in equities, you need to find something else. On easy way is locate either a single investment that all by itself would meet you desires. Another way is find a single investment that will meet the non-equity side of your desired mix.

So take all distributions from your current holdings and put those into the new stuff. If you need to take funds out of your portfolio to living - take it out of the older holdings.

For the next investment(s) I am talking about mutual funds (or ETFs that mimic mutual funds) I am a Vanguard person and all the funds I am in have ETF versions.

On a different thing - I question the idea of being only 35% in equities. Maybe if you have an expected life span of 10 years or that makes sense. Males age 65 today have a life expectancy of 18.1 years. That means you chances of being dead in 18.1 years is 50/50. Looking up the expectancy at the end of the 18.1 years means you have 1 chance of 4 of living to age 90 if you are 65 today. That is 25 years in which your purchasing power will decrease with inflation. But if you have 100 times your annual spending you don't have any problems.
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GOOD LORD!!!!!
I counted more than 30 subscription service they are selling. I bet that between them all, just about every stock in the Russell 3000 is recommended at least once.



Actually, it's the opposite. They tend to recommend many of the same stocks in multiple services.
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walt67, I have subscribed to various TMF services over the years, and I think that I did learn
more about investing from these services, and from the Fools of TMF who write and comment
on these services. I am currently subscribed to Stock Advisor.

The one thing I don't agree with is that these services recommend a stock every week.
It is very hard to find great companies to invest in, let alone finding 1 every week.
They do recommend stocks that they have already recommended, which is a good thing.
One of the best lessons I've learned was to invest in companies I already own, whose
stock price has gone up from my previous purchases. As is said, winners keep on
winning ( sometimes,lol ).

If I'm going to own 50 stocks, I'll just buy index funds.
Absolutely everybody is different, have different time horizons, have different
goals, etc. As has been stated elsewhere on this thread, you can find index funds
that focus on growth, value, etc, and target funds that take into account your age.
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Walt67: I’m retired and 77. I keep about 35% in equities. The problem is that as I implement recommendations of various Fool services (I belong to Boss Mode), I find myself squeezed into the large growth area, or at least growth in general. I’d like to be be more balanced with value etf/stocks, etc but it is hard to do that and also follow Fool services which tend to focus so much on growth. I’m guessing that others have the same practical problem. Any suggestions on this issue?

Hi, Walt. I see that you joined the Fool back in 1999, around the same time that I did, yet this is just your second posting on a message board. So presumably you've been doing a lot of reading of the various offerings -- and benefitting from them.

I will be turning 80 myself in the next week or so. Our main source of income is the RMD from my IRA, and my IRA as of yesterday is 67% equities, (50% a variety of ETFs, including last year's hit ARK funds, only 17% individual stocks). I keep cash (Money Market funds) sufficient to cover the next four years of RMDs. And the balance is invested in Options, following the conservative (for options) recommendations of the Fool's Options service. That keeps my mind active, is fun, and earns a good income, all of it in that IRA. This is not a path that would suit all temperaments, for sure--the options side of it--but I've loved it.

My main point to you underscores what others have already said, be very picky about the individual stock recommendations. Get into the ones you like, you understand--in short, that you care to follow. But at only 35% equities to begin with [unless we're talking many multiples of millions here], that's not really enough to spread around too thinly.

mathetes
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"I will be turning 80 myself in the next week or so. Our main source of income is the RMD from my IRA, and my IRA as of yesterday is 67% equities, (50% a variety of ETFs, including last year's hit ARK funds, only 17% individual stocks). I keep cash (Money Market funds) sufficient to cover the next four years of RMDs. "

I'm a bit puzzled by 4 years worth of RMDs in cash. Likely getting 0.5% or less interest .....

I'm 75. My IRA is about 50/50 with bond funds (lots of GNMA and corp bonds, some TIPS, some high yield), REITS, ) and SP500 and whole market funds.

The interest and dividends spin off currently 25% of my RMD. Used to be about 35%. Once a year, I sell 'something' to make up the next 12 months of withdrawals (RMD).

With the stock market up - I've had to sell a bit more each year as the value on Dec 31 has significantly increased over the past couple years. Of course, the value keeps rising each year the market plows ahead another 13-15%.

I have a CD now with a good 2 year's worth of living expenses (after SS and RMD). Had a couple but with 0.7% interest rates, moved them to my non-IRA account to collect dividends and bond interest.

Whatever rocks your boat.

Between my RMD now, my SS, a teeny weeny pension...... I don't need much more income to live very comfy, but should be spending another 50%, or my heirs and Uncle Sam will......


t
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