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No. of Recommendations: 3
Obviously right now isn't a good time to be in Arizona but when it is, people need to use some common sense and realize the dangers of intense sun, heat and low humidity.

We get people every year that go hiking w/o sufficient water and need to be rescued. And I'm not talking about remote locations but popular hiking areas like Camelback Mountain. There is little shade in most places, days are often cloudless, humidity can be quite low (under 10%) for much of the year (not so much in July-Sept) and the sun quite intense.

https://www.abc15.com/news/state/woman-dies-after-falling-at...

Also, be careful going to the Grand Canyon. Every year I read stories about people falling to their deaths. A Scottsdale woman did this the other day. People either slip and fall from a trail (she was found 100 feet below the trail she was on) or do really stupid stuff like fall to their death due to getting a photo taken.

I've left out all of the nasty critters that you can also encounter. Don't reach into bushes/shrubs since you don't know if a snake or spider is there. My barber a while ago was doing gardening on his property w/o gloves and moved a small rock and got bit by a brown recluse spider which causes extreme pain, lancing of the area multiple times and nearly lost the hand. And shake your shoes before putting them on in case a spider or more likely a scorpion craws into them. I have never had any issues but some areas have more critters than others.

People like going out early morning or closer to dusk due to it being a bit cooler but critters also like to come out those times as well. Most people never have an issue but you need to be aware of it.

My public service announcement for today :)
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I am to be hiking in Big Bend TX, next week.
Your comments are timely!

Thanks!
😷
ralph
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No. of Recommendations: 1
and don't count on a map or GPS being 100% accurate.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Pedant: the woman was hiking off-trail. Which is easy to do at the Grand Canyon. If you stay on the trails you're fine. If you venture over guardrails, or off the paved path, you're taking your life in your hands. The edge can be crumbly, and it's a long way down. At least on the rim. Trails into the Canyon aren't paved, and no guardrails. And lots of mule poo. But this woman wasn't doing that.

Also, if you're hiking in AZ it's helpful to know what a rattlesnake sounds like. There are buzzing insects that kinda sound similar if you aren't in the know. Once you've heard a rattlesnake, you won't ever forget that sound.

And, yes, the heat kills. There are people who keel over mowing their lawns. Much less hiking in shadeless desert potentially miles from help. Bring twice as much water as you think you'll need, because you probably are underestimating how much you need. You'll dehydrate like beef jerky in the AZ sun, and when you start to feel it it can already be too late. Visitors especially have this problem (we read about someone visiting from Minnesota -or wherever- thinking they'll go for a "walk" in June, and they get in trouble (or die) almost every year).

Good advice about checking your shoes. While it generally won't kill an adult, the AZ Bark Scorpion is seriously painful for a few days.
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