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For those of you who don't know, I'm actually the creator of this board a few years ago.
I've been immersed in other things-my former job, wedding plans(now over, thank God), securing my retirement benefits, and starting a new job with AFLAC-which still takes up most of my time. BTW, if anyone reading thisa needs a policy, let me know.:-)
I'm working on yet another State of Alabama corrution novel. I usually don't get past Chapter 8 on anything, but ironically, this one I'm currently working on is time-sensitive. Without going into detail, it centers around ongining litlgation in our state courts, which might be over in a few weeks at the lastest.
I'm only at 8K wordsand maybe 30% done-if that. I need a pick me up-I've read about finisinhg a novel in 30 days. That's probably the timeframe of a deadline I'm looking at.
Any help is appreciated.

-criscarson-
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>>>>wedding plans(now over, thank God)

Cris: Welcome back! I hope you're referring to the plans and not the marriage.... 8^}

>>>>I'm only at 8K wordsand maybe 30% done-if that. I need a pick me up-I've read about finisinhg a novel in 30 days. That's probably the timeframe of a deadline I'm looking at.
>>>>Any help is appreciated.

8K and you're almost 1/3 done? That's not really novel length. Typically, a novel is at least 70-80,000 words, and in some genres 100K or more is expected.

As for tips for writing a novel in 30 days, the technique others have used for NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), where the goal is to write 50K words in 30 days, is to divide your total goal (50K in this case) into 30 parts, giving you a daily goal of 1,666 words a day (to achieve 50K). But to do so, you really have to give up editing until you're done, and just write like mad. (If you can sail through that daily goal with ease, I guess you can take some time to edit, but the idea is to write first; then, only when you get the first draft done, go back and polish, polish, polish.

I've never tried to do that in 30 days. I can't really work like that--writing nonstop without editing. I find that I tend to get stuck periodically, and going back to reread what I've written and do some editing helps me get my writing jump-started again. (And I often get ideas for new directions to take the story in the process.)

I wrote the first draft of my first novel this way. It took me 69 days to write 81.5K words. That's not quite at the NaNoWriMo pace, but I got a lot of editing done in the process. (Eventually, over the next couple of years and several more drafts, the story grew to over 109K.)

There really aren't any "tricks" to writing a novel quickly. It's a matter of sitting down in a quiet place where you can spend several hours (preferably) undisturbed, and write like mad. Finding that much time is often tough to accomplish. That's what makes it so difficult to write a novel so quickly. (That, and the quality probably suffers from beinging in such a hurry. It doesn't give you a lot of time to plan out your plot, develop character traits ahead of time, etc.) Remember, the first draft is only a milestone on the way to a finished novel. (It might be enough to sell the idea of the book, but you still need to go back and flesh out the characters and scenes, polish the dialog to a sparkling gleam, and clean up all the grammar, spelling, syntax and punctuation.)

I wish you good luck.

Mark.
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I'm only at 8K wordsand maybe 30% done-if that. I need a pick me up-I've read about finisinhg a novel in 30 days. That's probably the timeframe of a deadline I'm looking at.
Any help is appreciated.


I'm not trying to win any races, but my method seems to keep me on task and moving along. Instead of a word goal, I basically tell myself I'm going to work for 3 pages. I don't edit at all except for when I got really stuck and had to do something other than just stare at my computer. Anyway, if you have some more time now, I don't see any reason you could pick that pace up to 9-10 pages a day.

I think maybe because I just naturally like order and structure, setting definitive daily work expectations for myself, I keep moving along. I've broken this rule once but I also make sure to call it a night once my goal has been met. That way I won't burn out.

Derek
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