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Barcoo

You really don't get it.
Whatever you think you might have I'm glad I've failed to catch it.

You see the 2 issues as being on different sides of the coin when they are different pieces on the same side of the coin.

What a stupid thing to say.

Foreign investment is always welcome in this country. This country owes a lot to foreign investment and those who market the proposition that in some way foreign investment is a threat to Australia do not understand the economic history of this country and do not understand what the best interests of this country represent. We have great resources, we can generate a certain amount of capital domestically to develop those resources but we will always need the investment of people from other countries, our friends and partners in friendly investing countries such as Korea to help along the process of that development.
From the prime minister.
http://www.pm.gov.au/news/speeches/2000/address1605.htm

You see investment is not the same as export income.
Foreign countrys will not invest in a low currencey esp one that is unstable, they need to be sure that their return on investment is certain.
Australia would be nothing without it, we could never have had enough capital to build the infrastructure needed to produce our export income.

From Rubin
Modifying our strong dollar policy could adversely affect inflation, interest rates and capital inflows and would lessen the favorability of our terms of exchange with the rest of the world.

Now read the below slowly.
Another consequence of the net capital inflows has been a strong dollar, which has lowered costs to consumers and producers for what we buy abroad, and more favorable terms of exchange between what we sell and buy abroad. The result is lower inflation, lower interest rates, higher standards of living, and greater productivity. The strong dollar has also helped attract capital from abroad.


The imbalance between exports and imports has occurred because of vast net capital inflows from around the world into the United States, motivated by the relative attractiveness of the United States for investment and as a repository for capital. That vast net inflow has allowed our consumption plus our investment to exceed what we produce. The consequence has been a lower cost of capital in our country and greater investment, which helped increase the rate of productivity growth.

http://banking.senate.gov/01_07hrg/072501/rubin.htm

end up lining the pockets of investors like wayjo and I.
Well a nice fantasy. You always seem to need to hold anothers hand to help you through & given your lack of understanding regarding cashflows I think it is very wise for you to do that.

Wealth is not income.

JR









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